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299 Days: The Visitors (Book Five) - book discussion [SPOILER ALERT]

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Mark54:

--- Quote from: Ken325 on March 27, 2013, 12:11:30 AM ---...One thing that I sort of worry about is Amazon selling my name as someone who bought this book... The problem is I don't want to be on someones list.

--- End quote ---

Well, at least you know you have a flag available, as Heavy-G will "disappear" before anyone comes for you.  ;)

bob3:
The thread title includes Spoiler Alert and I'll echo that here -- since this post is intended for people who've read it, I'm going to give something away.  Nothing huge, but definitely spoilery.

I had a hard time with Grant's conversion to (spoiler, told you) agreeing to kill Snellen.  He got control over his emotions enough to just barely restrain himself with the pedophile.  Logically, Snellen could be a larger threat, but his social development was still centered on individual rights.  When SF Ted pressed, Grant seemed to cave too quickly.  "Oh, there's a WAR?  Then okay."  Also, the way written, it seemed a large part of this decision was based on his belief that the Team would lose respect for him if he didn't agree to go kill the guy.  This small plot point my play out differently and make my criticism moot, but it seemed like a large out of character moment.  I understand the utility of using this quick conversion to illustrate the final abandonment of Grant's own normalcy bias, the ultimate "we ain't in Kansas anymore" moment, but I wasn't sold.

I enjoy this, though I echo the sentiment of those doing the dollars-per-word count and realizing it's a lot of money.  But I'm still buying.  Some if it is obviously an outlet for someone who's done a lot of thinking about this scenario, and is glad to have an outlet to express that thought, even at the expense of the narrative.  Frankly, I'm fine with that, too, because if I want very well-crafted story I'll go get a Jack Reacher novel; I value this for it's predictive value, and a "future history" needs some exposition. 

My biggest problem?  I read cool "fiction" like this to escape and enjoy.  As Cyprus steals accounts, the second amendment gets attacked, and other real life events echo the series, its escape value is getting smaller!!

Thanks, Heavy G.

MTUCache:

--- Quote from: bob3 on March 27, 2013, 11:10:39 AM ---When SF Ted pressed, Grant seemed to cave too quickly.  "Oh, there's a WAR?  Then okay."  Also, the way written, it seemed a large part of this decision was based on his belief that the Team would lose respect for him if he didn't agree to go kill the guy.  This small plot point my play out differently and make my criticism moot, but it seemed like a large out of character moment.

--- End quote ---
Agree, it did seem like he rolled over pretty quickly... but as Heavy G has said many times, Grant isn't perfect. He's not a hero all the time, and he's going to make plenty of big and little mistakes along the way.

Frankly, this book was the second time in the series when I really felt like I might dislike Grant if I knew him in real life (the first being when he left his family in... Book 2?...) . Most of the time you're getting into the story by putting yourself in his shoes, but as hard as these decisions are that he's making... I just couldn't do the same thing he's done.

I don't know how the rest of you felt about the courtroom drama and the legal proceedings, but I honestly think I would have been closer to Snelling's side than Grant's. I'm okay with the raid, that had to be done, and once they found out what had been going on it was obvious that they had to do something. But I can't get my head into a spot where I would be okay with executing somebody.... I don't know if it would have been as effective, but I think I would have pushed hard to have these criminals driven to the nearest Loyalist town and dropped off with whatever authorities are there, or taken out into the woods dozens of miles from anywhere (or off on an island in the Sound) and dropped off with nothing so nature could take care of it. Maybe that makes me a softy, but I don't think I could get my head there.

Likewise, at the end, when he agreed to ditch his family again. Maybe I don't have what it takes to be a true "patriot" in that sense of the word, but I wouldn't be willing to leave my family after I had done as much work as he has to ensure their safety. I get that he's not 100% secure where he's at, and there is lots of work left to be done... but at my center I'm ten times more interested in enjoying the rest of my life with my family than in the political and military goals that he's now signed up for. I know somebody has to do that job... and there might have been a time when I was ready to get in that line. But not now... I've got people who's lives are depending on me. People who are more important than me. I don't get to pick and choose what I sacrifice my life for now, no matter how noble that other cause may be.

Serenity Gulch:
IMO this book was nothing but fluff and filler. When longer and better-written ebooks (such as Going Home or Wool) can be found on Amazon for under $4 it doesn't make any sense to continue paying twice that much for this series. At this point I really don't care what happens next.

I share the complaints listed above so I won't repeat them here, but one that hasn't been mentioned yet is the 'outside voice'. I just sigh and roll my eyes every time it pops up. Are we to believe that Grant is some sort of modern-day Moses getting ready to lead his people out of the collapse? As preppers we have a hard enough time convincing people we're not crazy, and now in this prepper series the main character is hearing voices. Not the sort of thing I would pass along to my non-prepping family members to get them to change their minds.

bigjim71:
So far realy digging the book.

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