Author Topic: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries  (Read 6628 times)

Offline FreeLancer

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Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« on: February 25, 2013, 02:24:56 PM »
I've had it with flooded lead-acid technology for use as an emergency backup battery/inverter scheme.  After nearly ruining a pair of golf cart batteries from a combination of excessive charge current and poor fluid monitoring, I need something idiot proof, especially if I'm relying on it in an emergency. 

After researching, it looks like the AGM batteries made by Concorde, specifically the Lifestyle and SunXtender brands, are very highly rated and would work extremely well for this application.  I can't spill it, don't have to check fluid levels, no limit on charge/discharge currents, low rate of self-discharge, and superior shock and vibration tolerance.

So besides the price, is there any reason not to go with Lifeline AGM batteries?  Anybody have any experience with this brand?

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2013, 08:01:06 PM »
I went ahead and got a Lifeline GPL-30HT 150 Ah 12v battery.  It rides with an inverter in a rolling upright Pelican case, which makes moving it short distances pretty easy.  Using a Noco Genius 26000 amp unit in AGM mode for charging, everything is working very well.  No weird smells or bubbling, and no more sloshing fluids to check. 

I purchased it online from impactbattery.com, who shipped it free from the factory, and it arrived in immaculate condition.  This isn't your typical black sealed lead-acid battery, which tend to crap out on me or crack well before their time.  So far I'm very impressed with the construction and performance, and don't begrudge the extra cost.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2013, 08:09:38 PM »
Thanks for that info.  I stalled on a backup system plan a few years ago (too much research, not enough progress!).  Battery choice was one of the big issues I was stalled on, so I appreciate the mini-review.

Offline idelphic

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2013, 08:54:27 AM »
Nice looking battery..  out of my range..  but nice.  do you have any pictures of your setup?

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2013, 08:59:02 PM »
Here's the Lifeline AGM/Pelican setup:




Here's the flooded golf cart battery setup that I ruined thru the combination of charging at 55 amps with the Harris-recommended Schumacher, and forgetting to check the fluid levels:




On the left is the Noco Genius G4 charger that I use to keep up to 4 (@ up to 1 amp per channel) lead-acid batteries healthy (except for the fried GC-2s, they only charge to 80% capacity now) and ready to go.  In this picture it's hooked up to the AGM/Pelican unit, the golf cart pair, and a little 7 Ah SLA battery. 

On the right, the bigger charger is the Genius 26000 (26 amps) that I use for bulk charging the Lifeline AGM.  I really like these chargers!



Offline doublehelix

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2013, 12:02:05 PM »
Nice setup.

I like the Pelican case idea.

I've been using AGM's from MKBattery( http://www.mkbattery.com/ ) for the last several years in a fixed
environment. Only because I can drive to MK's west coast warehouse and pick them up with my business
account.

For emergency power and my ham radio setup, I don't think I would use anything other than AGM's again.


Offline bluprint

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2013, 06:00:18 PM »
What caused the Shumacher to ruin the batteries? I am planning to purchase the 40 amp model he recommends. Is this going to ruin the batteries? What did I miss?

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2013, 06:47:33 PM »
It was my fault, not the Schumacher's, although I probably won't use it much in the future because the Genius chargers just make more sense for a backup system.  Just plug it, in select the battery type, and forget it.

My pair of GC-2 batteries have about 220 Ah of capacity, so I should have turned the Schumacher down to the 20 amp setting, not the full 55 amps, which generated excessive heat and loss of electrolyte.  After the fact, unfortunately, I learned that flooded lead acid technology is best charged at under 10% of the battery capacity. 


Offline Carl

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Re: Concorde/Lifeline/SunXtender AGM Deep-cycle Batteries
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2016, 04:56:43 AM »
It was my fault, not the Schumacher's, although I probably won't use it much in the future because the Genius chargers just make more sense for a backup system.  Just plug it, in select the battery type, and forget it.

My pair of GC-2 batteries have about 220 Ah of capacity, so I should have turned the Schumacher down to the 20 amp setting, not the full 55 amps, which generated excessive heat and loss of electrolyte.  After the fact, unfortunately, I learned that flooded lead acid technology is best charged at under 10% of the battery capacity.

C10 or capacity divided by 10 (hours) is a good rule to use to avoid over stressing your battery bank while charging AND discharging as I would not exceed a 200 watt load on two GC2 cells for any length of time.