Farm, Garden and The Land > Permaculture, Land Management and Foraging

Wild Mushrooms

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DeltaEchoVictor:
Anybody hunt for 'em?  My squirrel hunting trips are generally a combination of looking at the tree tops & watching the ground for mushrooms.  I know there are a lot of opinions when it comes to edible fungi.  Let's hear yours, what's the best, what's the best way to make sure you're getting something safe?  Do you always spore test or do you rely on others to tell you what you have?  Who got you started?

If you have pictures of edible fungi in your area, post them & give us some general information including the best way to serve them, any mild reactions you've encountered, etc.

The edible varieties that I've found in my area are:
Morels
Coral Fungi
Boletes
Puffballs

These are the varieties that I frequently find that are readily identifiable.  I run across lots of others that I can't identify so easily, I usually leave the other varieties alone if I can't tell right away what they are.

I use The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms for identification purposes.  If I can't absolutely identify what I have & whether or not it's safe to eat, I do not eat them.

***DISCLAIMER***
Mushroom varieties are sometimes difficult to differentiate.  Because of this, make sure every effort is made to identify the fungi you pick, if you choose not to, bad things including death can occur.  The above list includes varieties I am able to eat, reactions can vary by person & my list shouldn't be construed to mean anyone can eat them or their closely related varieties.  Above all, be safe & err on the side of caution and if you can't identify a particular fungi & DO NOT EAT THEM.

spartan:
I loved to hunt mushrooms as a Boy Scout.  One of our leaders, "Mushroom" Bill was a local expert on more than 300 edible foods, particularly fungi.  He would take us out to pick things and then we would come back and cook what we found.  It's been so many years though I don't feel comfortable doing it on my own at the moment.

Thank you for mentioning The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms.  I will need to pick it up and take a look around to see what I can find.

ModernSurvival:
My favorite shroom is the rams head also know as the hen in the woods.  Here is a pic of one,



Other names for this are Maitake and Grifola frondosa

This shroom, fruits anytime from early September to late October and seems to be triggered by the first cold nights of the end of Summer. It is found mostly with dead or dying Oak trees.  They taste awesome and can be found in the same place year after year and often one shroom will go 20-30 lbs or more! ;)

dreadstalker:
I go morel hunting every year.
Great time of the year to be out and about.


--- Quote --- I run across lots of others that I can't identify so easily, I usually leave the other varieties alone if I can't tell right away what they are.

I use The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms for identification purposes.  If I can't absolutely identify what I have & whether or not it's safe to eat, I do not eat them.
--- End quote ---
It's right of you to do it that way too.

there is so many mushrooms out there that have close look alikes that can kill you the only way to be safe is to know EXACTLY wht you are picking. Many times there is no second chance.



DeltaEchoVictor:

--- Quote from: ModernSurvival on October 08, 2008, 08:48:14 PM ---My favorite shroom is the rams head also know as the hen in the woods.  Here is a pic of one,



Other names for this are Maitake and Grifola frondosa

This shroom, fruits anytime from early September to late October and seems to be triggered by the first cold nights of the end of Summer. It is found mostly with dead or dying Oak trees.  They taste awesome and can be found in the same place year after year and often one shroom will go 20-30 lbs or more! ;)

--- End quote ---


Nice!  I've yet to find one of those, & I've been looking too.  I hear they are great eatin'.  I believe we call them Hen o' the woods around here. 


--- Quote from: dreadstalker on October 08, 2008, 08:56:39 PM ---I go morel hunting every year.
Great time of the year to be out and about.


--- Quote --- I run across lots of others that I can't identify so easily, I usually leave the other varieties alone if I can't tell right away what they are.

I use The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms for identification purposes.  If I can't absolutely identify what I have & whether or not it's safe to eat, I do not eat them.
--- End quote ---
It's right of you to do it that way too.

there is so many mushrooms out there that have close look alikes that can kill you the only way to be safe is to know EXACTLY wht you are picking. Many times there is no second chance.





--- End quote ---

I know what you mean. 

As an aside, I went squirrel hunting last weekend (killed three) but spent most of the time being distracted by all the mushrooms I kept running across.  I ran across a conservation dept. corn field off a public access area that had a ton of puffballs growing in the grassy areas around the corn field.  They were in the perfect stage for picking & eating but I didn't pull any.  My hunting buddy was getting frustrated by my meandering around looking for mushrooms on the ground, instead of watching the treeline for squirrels.  I love days like that.

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