Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Medical Needs and First Aid

What causes blood pressure?

<< < (2/3) > >>

FreeLancer:
Hypertension is a silent disease, meaning you typically aren't aware of it, because blood pressure has to be extremely high to produce symptoms.

There is no psychological connotation associated with the use of the "tension" root word when describing blood pressure in physiology or medicine.  It's strictly referring to the physical property of pressure within the circulatory system, which is measured in mmHG (the height of a column of mercury).

Strengthfarm:
So there are many things that affect blood pressure. The rate, rhythm, stretch, and contration force of the heart, the hydration level of the patient, function of kidneys, condition of the vessels (arteries can actually contract and dilate, vessels have one-way valves and rely on muscle contraction to help squeeze blood back to the heart) and the position of the patient (orthostatic hypotension is present in many geriatric patients).

Also, the cuff should be properly sized and positioned, in line with the heart and the extremity should be relaxed. There will be a index mark which should be aligned with the major artery.




Understand when talking about the circulatory system, it is composed of 2 pumps, a low pressure pump and a high pressure pump. The body just places them together to make things easier.

First thing to understand is the top number (systolic) is the systemic resistance to blood flow when the heart contracts. The bottom (diastolic) is the resting pressure exerted against the walls of the circulatory system.

Then you have pulse pressure (S-D=PP).

A very narrow pulse pressure (<30mmHg) is concerning because it indicates your heart isn't functioning properly. There could be a number of causes but the mortality rate is quite high.

A wide pulse pressure indicates (>70mmHg) is concerning because it indicates that the vessels themselves aren't stretching properly. This eventually leads to the heart working too hard and growing to become stronger. Initially this allows it to beat harder, but it grows like a normal muscle and the space inside the heart actually shrinks as the heart grows, forcing the heart to beat harder and harder. Eventually you'll end up with LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy) and the output will be reduced no matter how hard and fast the heart pumps.

If someone is suddenly in a hypertensive crisis and stroke symptoms, it is important not to suddenly significantly drop their blood pressure. The reason is, they may be having a stroke and the hypertension is a protective mechanism to overcome the increased ICP (intra-cranial pressure) and CPP (Cerebral Perfusion Pressure) will be MAP (Mean Arterial Pressure, arguable the most important number to track) - ICP.

Some things to note, the heart receives blood during diastole, so, while most people don't pay attention to DBP, it actually is important.
 
MAP = [(2 x diastole) + systole] / 3  is actually probably the most important number to track.

surfivor:
I wonder if it is useful to get a blood pressure gauge to measure your own blood pressure ? How accurate or reliable are these things if you get them at the drug store ? I heard they changed blood pressure recommendations some time ago. I am not interested in taking statin drugs or the like but I have an interest in studying health parameters. Blood pressure seems like a fairly basic type of thing. I tend to not go to the doctors but I have an interest in studying aspects of health on my own

I think I also recalled reading that the number of adults with supposed high blood pressure is very high

CarbideAndIron:
Survivor,
I got my own monitor from like Rite Aid or Walgreens, can't recall which. But it's important to check yours like right when you wake up, or at a time when you're at rest, and haven't just done anything to get the heart rate up. Just like checking your resting heart rate, which is another rabbit hole you might want to look into.
But you want to use the same one, and I personally don't like the drug store ones because they get abused. You want something you know is in proper working condition. There will be a variance from one monitor to the next, so consistency is key here if you want to track progress.

CarbideAndIron:
Survivor,

--- Quote from: Strengthfarm on August 05, 2020, 02:44:06 PM ---So there are many things that affect blood pressure. The rate, rhythm, stretch, and contration force of the heart, the hydration level of the patient, function of kidneys, condition of the vessels (arteries can actually contract and dilate, vessels have one-way valves and rely on muscle contraction to help squeeze blood back to the heart) and the position of the patient (orthostatic hypotension is present in many geriatric patients).

Also, the cuff should be properly sized and positioned, in line with the heart and the extremity should be relaxed. There will be a index mark which should be aligned with the major artery.




Understand when talking about the circulatory system, it is composed of 2 pumps, a low pressure pump and a high pressure pump. The body just places them together to make things easier.

First thing to understand is the top number (systolic) is the systemic resistance to blood flow when the heart contracts. The bottom (diastolic) is the resting pressure exerted against the walls of the circulatory system.

Then you have pulse pressure (S-D=PP).

A very narrow pulse pressure (<30mmHg) is concerning because it indicates your heart isn't functioning properly. There could be a number of causes but the mortality rate is quite high.

A wide pulse pressure indicates (>70mmHg) is concerning because it indicates that the vessels themselves aren't stretching properly. This eventually leads to the heart working too hard and growing to become stronger. Initially this allows it to beat harder, but it grows like a normal muscle and the space inside the heart actually shrinks as the heart grows, forcing the heart to beat harder and harder. Eventually you'll end up with LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy) and the output will be reduced no matter how hard and fast the heart pumps.

If someone is suddenly in a hypertensive crisis and stroke symptoms, it is important not to suddenly significantly drop their blood pressure. The reason is, they may be having a stroke and the hypertension is a protective mechanism to overcome the increased ICP (intra-cranial pressure) and CPP (Cerebral Perfusion Pressure) will be MAP (Mean Arterial Pressure, arguable the most important number to track) - ICP.

Some things to note, the heart receives blood during diastole, so, while most people don't pay attention to DBP, it actually is important.
 
MAP = [(2 x diastole) + systole] / 3  is actually probably the most important number to track.


--- End quote ---


Wow, talk about hell of a first post. Thanks Strength, I felt I had a good basic understanding of it, but this was gold.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version