Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Martial Arts, Unarmed Self Defense, Hand To Hand Combat, and Physical Fitness

Tactical Fitness Plan

(1/6) > >>

PrepperJim:
All -

I am trying to improve my "tactical fitness" from a very basic level of couch potato to whatever is above couch potato. I am wondering if there is some sort of fitness plan that the military uses or can be adapted to fit my needs.

Max Velocity sells these plans for $99 to $129. That seems a little pricey and not a good value for my money. But, this looks like something like what I want.

http://home.trainingpeaks.com/products/trainingplans/plans/mvt-improve-your-tactical-fitness-plan-weeks-1-12-beginner?DCI=55&DSC=55

Anyone help?

ncjeeper:
I would start with an entry level crossfit program. Any places close by you where you could sign up for a months worth of classes?

theBINKYhunter:
My advice is to drop the 'tactical' from fitness and just focus on fitness. When I hear tactical fitness I think running round with a full rucksack, body armor, and a rifle. Unless you're in the military or we're in TEOTWAWKI I think there's little place for using that term.

I see a ton of other plans on this site for a lot less that $100 and you can get all kinds of 'couch to 5k' programs for free. I would suggest looking at a cheaper or free alternative to start. The other thing that stands out to me with the particular program you linked is the time commitment for each workout. Going from nothing to 1 hour a day and more on the weekends is going to be a huge change and a very hard transition. I'm not saying you can't do it, but I do think there might be better ways to get to that level.

Years ago I bought P90x thinking I would get ripped. Not even three weeks in I quit because I didn't have the time for a 60-90 minute workout because my lifestyle didn't allow it. My wife and I have both gotten serious about our health and fitness and have been working at it since Nov/Dec last year. She recently bought a different workout program that I've been doing with her. It's workouts are 15-25 minutes (so far) and are much easier to fit into our lives.

I'd strongly suggest some workout programs that ease you into things and then take a look at some high intensity interval training and/or strength training depending on what you want. There have been some studies that show HIIT training to be just as if not more effective that steady state cardio.

fritz_monroe:
If you want to get running, I'm a big fan of the Couch to 5k programs.  It gets you up to 5k distance in aobut 8 weeks.  Follow the plan and it works.  It is also flexible enough to work with you if you are more advanced or less advanced.

I don't like the "typical" workouts.  I've always been one that wants something a little different.  So I decided I wanted to do kettlebells.  I bought adjustable kettlebells for about $35 and an extra 5# plate for another $5.  There are several workouts floating around online for free.  But I ended up getting the Skogg Kettlebell workout to start.  It's really good to start with and will last a long time.  But it's only 4 exercises worked into several different workouts.  So I got tired of it.  That led me to the RKS program.  I have been doing that one for a couple of months.  It's really good.

I wanted a to broaden my workouts, so I picked up P90x3.  I don't do all of them because I don't like pull ups and push ups.  But there's 4 or 5 that I rotate into my workouts.  I also take these with me when I travel so I can workout in my hotel.


--- Quote from: theBINKYhunter on February 06, 2016, 12:42:34 PM ---Years ago I bought P90x thinking I would get ripped. Not even three weeks in I quit because I didn't have the time for a 60-90 minute workout because my lifestyle didn't allow it. My wife and I have both gotten serious about our health and fitness and have been working at it since Nov/Dec last year. She recently bought a different workout program that I've been doing with her. It's workouts are 15-25 minutes (so far) and are much easier to fit into our lives.

--- End quote ---
This is a huge issue for most people, just don't have the time.  That's why Tony Horton re-did it and came out with P90x3.  Each workout is about 30 minutes. 

PrepperJim:

--- Quote from: theBINKYhunter on February 06, 2016, 12:42:34 PM ---My advice is to drop the 'tactical' from fitness and just focus on fitness. When I hear tactical fitness I think running round with a full rucksack, body armor, and a rifle. Unless you're in the military or we're in TEOTWAWKI I think there's little place for using that term.

--- End quote ---

I guess I should have more clearly stated my goals and why I wanted some sort of military approach.

If things really go south, I think some sort of practical fitness will be incredibly necessary. By practical, I mean walking distances carrying loads (20-40 lbs) and being prepared to utilize firearms including a rifle. Guns and ammo are heavy as is water. I live in a subtropical climate so water will always be key to survival.

Additionally, should something happen during the workday that prevents car transport, I need the ability to walk to my son's daycare center and then get him home. It is about 5 miles to the daycare and 5 miles home. I can imagine carrying enough water, pistol, ammo, and other supplies that will end up being approximately 30 - 35 lbs. If it is hot, then I'll have to carry more water. Then, I may end up carrying him for some distance since he is small (I have an improvised means of transporting him without carrying him.  I can put my pack on that until it is time to convey him.)

One day, there was some localized flooding and all car routes were cut off between the daycare center and him house. I got within a mile of my house and pulled off into a parking lot.  It was still raining so I put on my rain gear, got the umbrella out and we "walked home" which was a combination of walking and me carrying him. I left my computer bag and get home bag in my car since we were so close. By the time we got home, I was very tired from carrying him. At the time, I cannot imagine walking 2, 3 or 4 miles in those conditions. Since then, I added the improvised means of conveying him if necessary so I would not have to carry him. 

So this is my reason for wanting to train the way soldiers train and getting that level of functional, tactical fitness.

Right now, I would be hard pressed to hoof it 5 miles in any sort of acceptable time frame carrying 20 lbs.  If I pushed hard, I could probably do it in 80 minutes in the best of conditions. What if it is 100F or raining, or both? Another consideration is that my fitness level right now is couch potato or a smidge above. I am also in my mid 40's and overweight so something that starts slow and builds up is probably best for me. I also do not belong to a gym and all the equipment I have is an elliptical machine.

I guess I can merge carrying a backpack and doing pushups, situps and other strength exercises to get to where I want to be. Maybe I will create my own program. ;-)


 

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version