Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Firearms Advice For Beginners

Dry firing: okay or not

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Chemsoldier:

--- Quote from: Carl on July 26, 2014, 06:53:01 AM ---Remove a bit of the rim from the shell and the extractor will not extract it till you use a dowel rod  to remove it for 'real' use.
My 'display' guns often have this an an extra level of safety to help keep my friends ratio up .

--- End quote ---
You seem to be confusing me with someone who has a work ethic.  It takes every fiber of my being to make myself actually do my dry fire.  Now I have to modify a case and find a dowel?  Who has this stuff?  ;D

flippydidit:

--- Quote from: Chemsoldier on July 26, 2014, 11:56:48 AM ---You seem to be confusing me with someone who has a work ethic.  It takes every fiber of my being to make myself actually do my dry fire.  Now I have to modify a case and find a dowel?  Who has this stuff?  ;D

--- End quote ---
What's the problem?  You're getting your firearms training, and get to go on a scavenger hunt.

soupbone:
For .22 RF, only dry fire if the Owner's manual says it's OK, otherwise, use a snap cap or a spent case. The firing pin striking the chamber can, depending on the firearm, peen it enough to cause problems in a very short while. Also, the firing pin striking something of similar hardness can induce stress into the pin itself, causing breakage [usually at the worst possible time]. Think of the stresses involved in a piece of metal going from zero to a gazillion miles an hour to zero in a fraction of an inch. A case, primer or snap cap serve to cushion the stop and contribute to the life of the firing pin.

And don't ever dry fire a spring piston air gun. Without the air cushion provided by starting and launching a pellet down the barrel, the piston will slam into the end of the cylinder with considerable force, ruining the piston head and seals with just a couple of "shots".

Done safely, and not taken to an extreme, dry firing is a very useful tool in acquiring and maintaining skill with a given firearm. Safety is the key - Unload the gun, unload it again, take all of the ammo for it and put it in another room. Run your exercises, and when you are finished, put that gun away for a while. Until you get out of the "Dry Firing Mental Mode". [If you feel the need to be armed during this waiting period, grab a totally different kind of firearm - a carbine or shotgun instead of another pistol, for example - to make bringing a gun into use a totally different experience.] This may seem extreme, but it sure beats "explaining" a hole in the TV, fridge, window, wall or person.

soup

16onRockandRoll:
I have seen .22s broken, and in one case, rendered worthless and unrepairable (according to the manufacturer, who then replaced the 30+ year old gun with a brand new upgraded version for free) by dry-firing. I will dry fire most rifles, shotguns, and striker fired pistols often, but unless the manufacturer okays it, I don't do it at all with rimfire. And for the love of God, don't dry fire a revolver that doesn't belong to you without express permission from the owner. Especially an older one with collectible value. I had a customer looking at an immaculate S&W model 19, and he was talking to one of our newer employees when he said " I read that Smith and Wesson says it is okay to dry fire any of their revolvers."  He then proceeds to dry fire it five or six times, running a scratch around the cylinder from the locking mechanism on a gun that had NEVER had the cylinder turned!  His casual dry fire devalued a perfect gun by over $100, and he then handed it back with a "Boy, that is nice!" And never showed any real interest in purchasing it. Great way to make the guys in the gun store not like you. I have heard too many similar stories from private collectors too.

flippydidit:

--- Quote from: 16onRockandRoll on July 27, 2014, 01:26:51 AM ---I have seen .22s broken, and in one case, rendered worthless and unrepairable (according to the manufacturer, who then replaced the 30+ year old gun with a brand new upgraded version for free) by dry-firing. I will dry fire most rifles, shotguns, and striker fired pistols often, but unless the manufacturer okays it, I don't do it at all with rimfire. And for the love of God, don't dry fire a revolver that doesn't belong to you without express permission from the owner. Especially an older one with collectible value. I had a customer looking at an immaculate S&W model 19, and he was talking to one of our newer employees when he said " I read that Smith and Wesson says it is okay to dry fire any of their revolvers."  He then proceeds to dry fire it five or six times, running a scratch around the cylinder from the locking mechanism on a gun that had NEVER had the cylinder turned!  His casual dry fire devalued a perfect gun by over $100, and he then handed it back with a "Boy, that is nice!" And never showed any real interest in purchasing it. Great way to make the guys in the gun store not like you. I have heard too many similar stories from private collectors too.

--- End quote ---
That advice also goes for many 1911-style pistols.  The breech face and chamber can be damaged on some (specifically, match pistols).

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