Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Camping

combining wool and polypro inner layers. How to?

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Greekman:
i am wondering. If you are to wear a wool and a polypro thermal underwear (or socks) together, what would you put next to the skin?

I wore two different kinds of socks one day without giving any though on it, with wool on the inside. I was amazed that when I removed my shoes, the outer polypro was wet (from perspiration) and the wool was rather dry.

Cedar:
Wool wicks. So most of my dogsledding and outdoor garb is always wool. Even though you are recommended not to, I wore cotton under my wool socks and upperwear. If I did not wear cotton, I wore silk, as it does keep you warm. I did not believe it at first, but the old-timers had me try it, and sure enough the silk worked as well as my Patagonian gear.

I wear jeans under my WWII wool army pants, and never was cold at -40c

Cedar

Chemsoldier:
There are some modern synthetics that wick away like crazy. Also remember that even some synthetics do retain their warming properties even when wet.

I am not really qualified to talk about all the synthetics these days by name but it's worth a look.

Another trend I have seen is thing outer layers that allows you to completely adjust layering from the outside.  Traditionally, you wore pants for instance, then it got colder and you put long undies under them. Then it got colder and a layer over the pants went on.  As your work load, the temp and the wind changed you shifted layers and that dang long undy layer was a pain since you had to take all layers off to adust it.

Getting away from that underlayer/overlayer issue makes life way easier. 

Cedar:

--- Quote from: Chemsoldier on January 27, 2018, 04:43:37 PM ---As your work load, the temp and the wind changed you shifted layers and that dang long undy layer was a pain since you had to take all layers off to adust it.

Getting away from that underlayer/overlayer issue makes life way easier.

--- End quote ---


Especially for a gal when nature calls. And why I try to only wear two layers. Falling 10-15 foot down a tree well once was enough.

Cedar

AvenueQ:
Wool alone is usually enough for me, though if it's really cold I put on a silk layer underneath the wool. I bought wool hiking socks at Costco years ago and I've never bought any other material again (for socks, anyway). Modern wools are so soft that it can easily be worn next to the skin without itching, and combined with its natural wicking properties it's a darn near perfect insulator. Plus, I've found it lasts longer than many synthetics if cared for properly.

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