Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Food Preps

Bone stock/broth

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Carver:
I came across another "portable soup" video, wasn't even looking for it. Morning Sunshine you have to look at this and tell me what you think. The advice at the tail end has a number of observations on how to do this and what not to do. And after watching this and the Jas Townsends video and thinking on how you make biltong I'm going to venture to say you don't need salt.
Anyway, here it is.
https://youtu.be/z1t1c51Njac

Morning Sunshine:

--- Quote from: Carver on April 14, 2020, 07:21:57 PM ---I came across another "portable soup" video, wasn't even looking for it. Morning Sunshine you have to look at this and tell me what you think. The advice at the tail end has a number of observations on how to do this and what not to do. And after watching this and the Jas Townsends video and thinking on how you make biltong I'm going to venture to say you don't need salt.
Anyway, here it is.
https://youtu.be/z1t1c51Njac

--- End quote ---

thanks.  good video.  I know that mine did get to a boiling point a few times, and I could taste that before it was fully dried.  I might try the crockpot method next time.

I am worried about the salt.  Meat does not like to stay good by itself out in the open.  Salt has traditionally been used to preserve it.  Why is salt not needed in these two recipes?  Why does the meat product not turn rancid or bad?  This is my big burning question.

In my bottled broth, I have never used salt, since my pressure canning makes it safe.

And my dehydrator - I keep that on pretty low heat, since an excalibur can control the temperature, but even so, the lowest is only at 105.

next time.... Next time I will try this method

Carver:
My guess is that the meat won't go bad if the fat and moisture is removed. Perhaps the use of a jerky cure would a certain method.

Morning Sunshine:

--- Quote from: Carver on April 15, 2020, 08:11:13 AM ---My guess is that the meat won't go bad if the fat and moisture is removed. Perhaps the use of a jerky cure would a certain method.

--- End quote ---

jerky has salt.

I can see if the fat and moisture are gone.  But there are WEEKS on the counter before the moisture is gone.

Carver:
What I meant by jerky cure was sodium nitrate, or nitrite; whichever one it is. I think the salt in a jerky making kit is in the seasoning and for the purpose of curing. After doing a search of numerous "portable soup" recipes it seems to me the use of salt is only for seasoning and no cure is used. I couldn't find a Jackie Clay column on making bouillon, but a good number of them leave the soup leather out on a drying rack for weeks, so I'm going to go with not using salt. I also do not add salt to broth.

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