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The Economic Fallout of Alienating Customers

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Greekman:
AS bit of late posting but I think it worths, cos i have to offer a different perspective.

Gillette and the likes may loose a battle but they are winning the war on masculinity.

let me validate this.
I have a friend in a high position in a BIG clothing firm, gay coupled owned and very gay friendly, to the extend of sponsoring the gay parades.
When we discussed the subject matter he position was clear.
Big firms like his, WANT to feminize men cos then they spent as big as women. So they push
As you know women tend to spend more on ephemeral goods while men on more constant/durating value ones. (This is not gender profiling, this is statistics).
I guess this makes things more clear.

P&G may have screwed up in Gillette sales, but further down the road it will earn much more by its Shampoos

The Professor:

--- Quote from: Greekman on July 25, 2019, 01:36:53 AM ---AS bit of late posting but I think it worths, cos i have to offer a different perspective.

Gillette and the likes may loose a battle but they are winning the war on masculinity.

. . .snip. . .

P&G may have screwed up in Gillette sales, but further down the road it will earn much more by its Shampoos

--- End quote ---

I believe it.  Imagine trying to sell "Axe" body spray in the 50's.  Or, man-buns in the 1940's.

Historically, it has been suggested that even in the most masculine of cultures, such as those of what we call The Vikings, the men kept themselves on a "beauty regimen" that surpassed those of women.  This is/was especially prevalent in the mid-to-upper socioeconomic classes.  We men are just as vain, if not more so, than women.

Now, if you don't mind, I'm late for my Mani and Pedi.

The Professor

David in MN:
And Cadbury joins the ranks of preaching to its customers.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/30/india/cadbury-unity-bar-india-scli-intl/index.html

Its "Unity Bar" has different colors of chocolate to [I guess] call out the different hues of human skin. For the India market. Did they leverage the vast and complex history of Indian cuisine to flavor it? Umm no. I guess their message is that diversity and inclusion are just a skin color thing and it's now racist to prefer dark/milk/white chocolate.

I've never thought I had some kind of racial bias because I prefer dark chocolate with a little bitter bite. I will fully admit I find milk chocolate bland and white chocolate is inedible. That's just my palate. But if you know people prefer one or the other why put all 3 in one bar?

At some point we need a sober discussion. If you're the person who needs a candy bar to prove you're not a racist scumbag maybe you need to walk the desert and have a good think about yourself. And I wonder about the person who chooses multicolor chocolate rather than the one he prefers. What does it say about a person that his candy needs a political message?

Greekman:
sorry but I feel Cadbury is right. there is something to be said as a racism determination device.
Which side are you biting (like) first? which side are you (o)ppressing with your filthy racists fingers?

David in MN:

--- Quote from: Greekman on September 06, 2019, 09:32:45 AM ---sorry but I feel Cadbury is right. there is something to be said as a racism determination device.
Which side are you biting (like) first? which side are you (o)ppressing with your filthy racists fingers?

--- End quote ---

Oh too funny. Am I a racist for biting the dark end while only holding the white end? Have we created the candy bar I'm too nervous to actually eat? Do I run the risk of being racist if I don't like the flavor?

I do not understand the mentality that needs to call out racial awareness in a kids candy bar. My 4 year old has the mental maturity to accept all races and creeds and be polite to them.

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