Author Topic: Hiking kit  (Read 28222 times)

Offline r_w

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #30 on: May 28, 2014, 07:34:09 AM »
tip on sam splints:  They can be made into a pack frame sheet, it is like they were made to fit in camelbak bladder slots.  But yeah, they are still a little bulky so you need to weigh (pun intended) your options. 


Offline donaldj

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #31 on: May 28, 2014, 10:27:14 AM »
I'd look for a way to measure distance. Either a GPS or some pace counters.  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00H7PK2R2

I assume this is in addition to your EDC kit, including a cell phone?

Also, I'd look at a Lifestraw as well as the purifying tablets.

As for the monocular you're carrying: In Michigan, there are generally so many trees and the terrain is mostly flat (ie, not hilly enough to climb a peak and see quite a ways). I'm assuming your area's terrain is such that the monocular would be useful? If not, glass is heavy...   =)

Offline Chandlerpackrat

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2014, 10:10:47 PM »
Please read if you have any interest in snake bite kits, it can do more harm than good.

http://www.backpacker.com/may_09_treat_a_snakebite/skills/13082

There are MANY other stories of this like.
Thanks for the information, I was not aware of that..

endurance

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Offline inconel710

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2014, 10:05:57 AM »
As for the monocular you're carrying: In Michigan, there are generally so many trees and the terrain is mostly flat (ie, not hilly enough to climb a peak and see quite a ways). I'm assuming your area's terrain is such that the monocular would be useful? If not, glass is heavy...   =)

You'd be surprised what optics can reveal in heavily wooded terrain.  I carry binos during hunting season and just sitting down and and scanning with them reveals so much more in the forest.  Last year, I spotted two mule deer through the trees at less than a hundred yards that way.  I can see a relatively light monocular adding a lot of enjoyment to a hike.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #35 on: May 31, 2014, 02:16:19 PM »
I have the Brunton Echo 7x18 Pocket Scope and the Bushnell Bear Grylls 9x32 waterproof/fogproof monocular.

The Bear Grylls is a better optic, but is twice the size of the Brunton. I could put it in my pocket or pack and not even notice it's there. It really could add some enjoyment during a hike like  inconel710 said.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2014, 09:59:16 PM »
Thanks for all the help and suggestions. My kit is coming along nicely :)

One decision I could use some help on...Columbia River Ritter RSK MK5 or Gerber EAB Lite?

endurance

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2014, 10:12:39 PM »
Personally, I prefer the MK5 because it's one piece of steel.  No moving parts so it can be beat upon without fear of failing.  That said, I carry a scalpel blade in my kit in case I need something crazy-sharp.  I have a folder that holds the scalpel blade and while it's good for some work on dressing out an animal, it's not good for heavy work because the blade can snap or pop out of place.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2014, 10:49:44 PM »
A folder a scalpel goes into? That sounds interesting. If I had something like that there would be no need for the Gerber.

The MK5 would be just an extra option since it's only a bit over an ounce.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #39 on: June 04, 2014, 05:48:41 AM »
My instinct is that what you carry depends on the hike.

Will you be:

In or near water?
On a cliff/mountain?
around dangerous animals?
in extreme heat or cold?
out of phone reception?
alone?
orienteering or on a trail?
scouting a hunting site?

My gear changes for the purpose.

endurance

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #40 on: June 04, 2014, 06:15:59 AM »
A folder a scalpel goes into? That sounds interesting. If I had something like that there would be no need for the Gerber.

The MK5 would be just an extra option since it's only a bit over an ounce.
http://www.amazon.com/Havalon-61182-Piranta-Folding-Knives/dp/B00AAJO9R6/
Just be aware the blades do pop loose under lateral pressure and I prefer to use a leatherman to swap blades because they take a bit of force to remove and install.  It can be done with bare hands but one slip with a blade that sharp and you now have a medical emergency.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #41 on: June 04, 2014, 07:53:10 AM »
Thanks, endurance! You always have fun toys.

nelson96

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #42 on: June 04, 2014, 10:55:38 AM »
http://www.amazon.com/Havalon-61182-Piranta-Folding-Knives/dp/B00AAJO9R6/
Just be aware the blades do pop loose under lateral pressure and I prefer to use a leatherman to swap blades because they take a bit of force to remove and install.  It can be done with bare hands but one slip with a blade that sharp and you now have a medical emergency.

I've never had a problem with my Havalon, but I agree one should be careful with these crazy sharp blades.

Offline Black November

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #43 on: June 04, 2014, 01:47:40 PM »
In the recent years, I've started to pair-down my gear for a more minimalist approach. I got tired of carrying around a giant bag waiting for the Zombie apocolypse.

I currently just carry a Maxpedition 10 x 4 Nalgene carrier, with all the basic necessities:

Nalgene Bottle
Snow peak Nesting Nalgene pot & lid
Beeswax tuna can stove w/ grill
Lighters, Vaseline cotton balls, tealights
Altoid IFAK+soap/sanitizer
Head lamp
Mini compass
Frontier straw
Cordage
Esee Candiru (Izula recommended)
Utility spork/Folding chopstick
Sharpie
Duct tape
Garbage bag
large & small Wet wipes
Other stuff I'm forgetting.....
« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 01:55:03 PM by Black November »

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #44 on: June 04, 2014, 06:55:18 PM »
Interesting you mention the Maxpedition because I was looking at that and the Condor version that's half the price. I know you get what you pay for, but the Condor has very good reviews on Amazon (actually better than the Maxpedition). Either way I'm going to be searching for a good shoulder strap to go with it. Else it will be bouncing around like crazy on a hike.

Offline Black November

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #45 on: June 05, 2014, 03:59:44 PM »
I will try to post some pics when I get home, but I have 2 wonderful mods for nalgene style carriers.

1. Make a carry handle by sewing 1" velcro strips along 1" webbing.
2. Put a small paracord drawstring loop through the molle webbing as a shoulder strap keeper.

**It doesn't bounce around very much. With an adjustable strap you can even make it into a waist pack.
***Also the Maxpedition Dip can holder fits inside the 10 x 4 naglene holder with a nalgene bottle for compartmental storage.

Here is some oldy but goody nalgene holder P0rn http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/602157-Maxpedition-Bottle-holder-kit-review-and-pics
« Last Edit: June 05, 2014, 04:20:03 PM by Black November »

Offline Black November

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #46 on: June 06, 2014, 02:51:45 PM »
Below are some pics when I get of my 2 wonderful mods for nalgene style carriers.

1. Make a carry handle by sewing 1" velcro strips along 1" webbing.


2. Put a small paracord drawstring loop through the molle webbing as a shoulder strap keeper.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #47 on: June 06, 2014, 09:41:50 PM »
That looks nice!

Offline TwoXForr

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #48 on: July 02, 2014, 12:11:33 PM »
I disagree with carrying raingear in a small pack.   I encourage carrying large strong contractor trash bags that can do double duty as both raingear and a container type device, not to mention waterproofing in a shelter.   

Offline Cedar

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #49 on: July 02, 2014, 12:23:35 PM »
I disagree with carrying raingear in a small pack.   I encourage carrying large strong contractor trash bags that can do double duty as both raingear and a container type device, not to mention waterproofing in a shelter.

That is what I do. I actually put it in first, line it with a second one sometimes (or put it inside) and then put my gear inside it. It waterproofs my gear in case the pack isn't.

Cedar

Offline Badhog

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #50 on: July 02, 2014, 08:18:45 PM »
I really like that idea.

nelson96

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #51 on: July 02, 2014, 11:53:57 PM »
I disagree with carrying raingear in a small pack.   I encourage carrying large strong contractor trash bags that can do double duty as both raingear and a container type device, not to mention waterproofing in a shelter.

Trash bags wouldn't last a day unless you're walking open pavement.  I prefer layering with a thin gortex jacket and pants that can also offer a bit of warmth.  My jacket and pants can each wadd up and zip in to their own pocket.  They offer much better abrasion resistance than plastic and have held up very well in thick brush and occasionally rolling down hills.  Not to mention they can cover every square inch of my body, where a trash bag could not.

Items that need protected from moisture get put in a gallon zip-lock baggie or a stuff bag made for the purpose.  Again, a trash bag wouldn't last long coming in and out of a tight bag every day and I don't like having all my items in a single bag (ie trash bag) anyway.  You could also go with a raincover that goes over the outside of your entire pack.

endurance

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #52 on: July 03, 2014, 07:32:28 AM »
Trash bags wouldn't last a day unless you're walking open pavement.  I prefer layering with a thin gortex jacket and pants that can also offer a bit of warmth.  My jacket and pants can each wadd up and zip in to their own pocket.  They offer much better abrasion resistance than plastic and have held up very well in thick brush and occasionally rolling down hills.  Not to mention they can cover every square inch of my body, where a trash bag could not.

Items that need protected from moisture get put in a gallon zip-lock baggie or a stuff bag made for the purpose.  Again, a trash bag wouldn't last long coming in and out of a tight bag every day and I don't like having all my items in a single bag (ie trash bag) anyway.  You could also go with a raincover that goes over the outside of your entire pack.
It really depends for me.  If there's no rain in the forecast and I'm traveling fast and light, then I feel perfectly comfortable with nothing but a disposable poncho and appropriate clothing for the predicted weather.  However, if there's a 30% chance of T-storms, I'm adding a bulk layer (fleece or poly pro or wool) in addition to proper rain attire.

If I lived where you live, Nelson, I suspect I'd do the same as you every day.  That said, even the bad T-storms here rarely last more than 2-3 hours, with is short enough to hunker under a tree in most cases.

Offline TwoXForr

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #53 on: July 05, 2014, 10:40:03 AM »
Of course meteorology, terrain and vegetation drive equipment, but for moderate conditions, I like the versatility of bags, and for cost and size they are better than nothing. 

nelson96

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2014, 01:04:29 PM »
Of course meteorology, terrain and vegetation drive equipment, but for moderate conditions, I like the versatility of bags, and for cost and size they are better than nothing.

Everybody has their own preferences based on experiences, but as I noted above, my raingear takes up very little room and it weighs ounces.  For the sake of the group watching this thread and enjoying their experience on a hike if rain is expected, I would recommend being better prepared and having "better than nothing" which is what I feel a garbage bag would be [nothing].

Did you know that you can buy 2 gallon, 3 gallon and larger Ziploc bags for keeping things organized and dry in your pack?  I normally use 1 gallon and smaller but there are options.  They're not too expensive and last a long time.  I can't tell you how many years I've gotten out of the bags I use.

If there's no rain in the forecast and I'm traveling fast and light, then I feel perfectly comfortable with nothing but a disposable poncho and appropriate clothing for the predicted weather.

If there is no rain in the forecast I don't carry any form of raingear, but take appropriate clothing.

.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #55 on: July 05, 2014, 06:48:10 PM »
     Baghog; For most inland lake fishing, where your going after sunfish, perch, smallmouth bass and the like, 6 lb. test monofilament line is pretty universal. The lighter the test line, the more chance of getting these smaller fish. Of course, light line is usually paired with an appropiate weight rod, to act as a "shock absorber". If your line is tied at the end of stick, it might be better to use a heavier weight. If you can rig a float and toss out a line from shore, you've probably got the best setup. I've caught many panfish just jigging with a 4 or 6lb. handline, over the the side of a boat. Haven't done much river fishing, but moving water usually requires a sinker rig of some sort, to hold your line in place against the current.
     Tying a good knot in monofilament is not difficult, but it does require types of knots that may be unfamiliar. Mono will make a sturdy repair, but needs special knots. By the way, old wine corks make pretty good bobbers and they don't weigh much.

Offline Carl

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Re: Hiking kit
« Reply #56 on: July 06, 2014, 07:13:48 AM »
OH MAN...a bottle of wine,fresh caught panfish cooking next to a fire and a sunset shared with my dog Brandi....It just don't get any better than that.....