Author Topic: Winter Jacket  (Read 34484 times)

Offline CharlesH

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #60 on: January 05, 2014, 07:12:28 AM »
You don't find the parks too noisy?  That's my one gripe is that mine is very loud to move in.
 
It does make sense to consider what you are going to be doing outside when choosing your layers.  If you are enjoying a quiet walk in the woods over fresh fallen snow, the rasping of certain materials can be frustrating.  If you are blowing or shoveling snow or otherwise working around the homestead it may not matter at all.  Each situation will be different and that is definitely a good point to make.  For economics is probably the main consideration.  I go with what I have and add layers as needed usually.

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #61 on: January 05, 2014, 09:19:02 AM »
You don't find the parks too noisy?  That's my one gripe is that mine is very loud to move in.
  Mine is noiser than wool or fleece would be, but it works just fine.  You just have to be careful and always aware of what's around you.

endurance

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #62 on: January 05, 2014, 04:02:32 PM »
I used it one year, but I've since opted for using other stuff for hunting.  It's not as warm, but then again, my hunting season isn't in the dead of winter, either.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #63 on: February 03, 2014, 12:53:33 PM »
Has anyone every tried any of the Asbell wool products?

http://www.gfredasbell.com/gfa_wool_clothing.php


Offline r_w

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #64 on: February 03, 2014, 07:13:13 PM »
Has anyone every tried any of the Asbell wool products?

http://www.gfredasbell.com/gfa_wool_clothing.php

Not yet.

I haven't heard anything bad about the product.

They can be hard to get ahold of, between the hunting season and the show circuit, but they seem to get product made and shipped just fine.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #65 on: February 04, 2014, 09:56:54 AM »
I spoke to a lady there yesterday and she was extremely nice. Their products are 85% wool 15% blend. Now to find out how they hold up...and how warm they actually are.

Would it be better to have a thin wool layer under a Carhartt or some kind of synthetic under one of their wool products?

Offline riverbend_rich

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #66 on: February 21, 2014, 11:06:05 PM »
Those under armor hoodies you see everybody wearing are great for a mid layer, you may also find the army surplus thermals for a decent price used. In my opinion staying dry is the most important part of staying warm. So that is why Carhart is for working in and not survival (or back country hunting) when you only get to bring one coat. Also versatility and flexibility are very important in these situations. Last October while elk hunting we found ourselves shedding and adding layers multiple times a day to stay regulated. Check out wranglerstar on YouTube for a good video he just put up on this topic.

Offline vitaminka

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #67 on: April 03, 2014, 03:09:14 AM »
I prefer ski jacker on winter

endurance

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #68 on: April 03, 2014, 06:25:07 PM »
...

Would it be better to have a thin wool layer under a Carhartt or some kind of synthetic under one of their wool products?
I'm a layer guy so you can constantly adjust to your activity level.  I like a thin (170) wool layer as my base, then usually either a wool or synthetic mid layer, then either additional layers (possibly down, possibly wool, possibly synthetic) then a shell.  Wool next to my skin never feels clammy, cotton always feels clammy, poly sometimes can feel clammy since the fibers themselves are hydrophobic, but the space between the fibers can still hold moisture.  Unless wool gets soaked, moisture gets pulled to the center of the fiber so the surface always feels warm and dry to me.  Everything has its limits, but the more I wear wool base layers, the happier I am that I've spent the money on it rather than going with cheaper poly stuff. 

Now that I'm responding on winter calls with the fire department I have set up an upper body layer system that's always together so I can get dressed in a hurry for middle of the night calls.  It's a wool (170) base layer, a wool (260) mid-layer, a midweight poly mid-layer and my department t-shirt.  I then wear a sweatshirt under my bunker coat (I don't have my FFT1 yet, so I don't make building entry, thus I don't make building entry, so poly is still safe for me).  On the bottom half I have some fleece-lined pants that go under my bunker gear with wool socks.  So far the only thing that has gotten cold is my feet and my hands (and that was in 0F directing traffic on a cold and shady highway for about 30 minutes without a break to warm up).

Offline frankd4

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #69 on: July 28, 2014, 08:03:56 AM »
I like the military Gortex jackets with the insulated liners good to 40 below and then some I buy them from Goodwill for 25 to 30 dollars Cabela's sells them for 250.00 dollars.

Offline DrJohn

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #70 on: July 28, 2014, 10:52:48 AM »
I have been very happy with the products from Wiggy's Alaska.  Not cheap, but very well made.

http://wiggys.com/category.cfm?category=27

Offline GrizzlyAdams

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #71 on: August 15, 2014, 05:25:05 PM »
I recently found this jacket from Canada Goose.  Very expensive, but seems to be well made and has good reviews.  This one also seems to be built for life in the arctic.

http://www.amazon.com/Canada-Goose-Expedition-Spirit-X-Large/dp/B003M2X1F4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1408145006&sr=8-1&keywords=canada+goose

GA

Offline goofyshooter

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #72 on: August 15, 2014, 05:34:15 PM »
I bought a Carhartt Bad Axe last winter, while I was working in Idaho. I LOVE IT. Its waterproof and warm as hell.

Offline Badhog

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #73 on: September 05, 2014, 09:29:16 PM »
I ended up with a lot of good products out of this topic. Now I need a hat and gloves/mittens.

endurance

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #74 on: September 05, 2014, 09:41:19 PM »
A few years ago I picked up some gloves at costco with a little zippered pocket on the back. For the first year I had no clue what the pocket was for, then someone told me they were for hand warmers. Wow, best gloves I've ever owned since I figured that out. Toss in a disposable hand warmer and you'll have warm hands in any weather for hours.

Offline r_w

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #75 on: September 06, 2014, 06:55:34 AM »
Hats!  I wish I could find one winter hat that fit 80% of my needs.  Carhart has an insulated ball cap with ear flaps that is a pretty good hat I need to try, it is probably close.  I have a mad bomber hat that is great when the weather sucks, but it needs to be below zero to wear it while moving.  Great for the deer stand, though. 

I have several wool watch caps of varying thickness-icebreaker, smartwool, etc.-and under armor and zensah synthetic, and a wool buff.  I also have several scarves from goodwill over the years. 

My usual around the place is a wool felt crushable hat with the buff and silk cowboy square in a pocket if needed. 

I have a couple hat and scarf combos that work well to seal up sportcoats for winter work.

I guess the moral of the story is the solution is a system that works together.  The right hat depends on the weather, the activity, and the coat you are wearing it with.


Offline GrizzlyAdams

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #77 on: October 24, 2014, 06:18:39 PM »
I am a fan of "Everest Design" hats.  They claim to be made in Nepal.  I have one, and can say it is very good quality and very warm.

http://www.rei.com/search?query=everest+designs&tx=C

GA

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Winter Jacket
« Reply #78 on: October 26, 2014, 06:58:52 AM »
     This is probably off topic, but just some thoughts from someone who lives above 45 lattitude. So far I don't think anyone has mentioned the trick of wearing a pair of women's pantyhose as a base layer. Might be a little embarassing if you wind up in the ER, but they really help if you get cold legs. I have also used the trick of putting my feet in a plastic bag before putting on socks and pac-boots. Your feet will perspire to a point of high humidity and then stop, but your socks and boot liner insulation will stay dry. If you use a down sleep system you can also use a vapor barrier in side to prevent the down from soaking up body moisture. A cheap emergency bivy sack, inside of your bag (must be inside) will do. Again you will perspire to a point of high humidity, and then stop. You may feel "clammy", but you will be warm. In really cold weather, down sleeping bags can collect pounds of insulation killing moisture just from insensible body perspiration. Of course everyone knows never to cover your face and breath into a sleeping bag in cold weather.
     I use mostly the synthetics. I do have German army wool pants, but if I use them, I wear U.S. army poly underwear (or pantyhose). As for gloves, you can't beat dropping an eight hour hand warmer in each. During deer season, I can sit on a bucket for hours and hand warmers make any pair of gloves work. If your fingers get cold, pull them out of the glove fingers and wrap them around the hand warmer in the palm of your glove, 'til the feeling returns. Mittens are always warmer than gloves. They make an instant handwarmer that is re-usable. It contains a liquid, that when activated by pressing a metal disc sealed inside the plastic pouch, that crystalizes from a liquid to a solid, releasing lots of heat instantly; stays hot for about 30 minutes. You can recharge them by putting them in boiling water until the solid melts back to a liquid and it's ready to go again (forever). I usually carry one for critical use, like when I can't feel my fingers after pulling a big fish out of an ice hole. 
      If you have to sit for any period of time (as in deer hunting) you must have a "Hot Seat". Most are a circular sack filled with poly beads to a couple of inches thick. They don't create their own heat, but insulate so well that it feels like you're sitting on a stove. If its really bad, I'll throw a small piece of scrap carpet on the floor of my blind to insulate my feet from the frozen ground. This also works for ice fishing. If you go out in winter without a good hat, you deserve what you get, no matter how good a jacket you have.
     In the winter, wind is much more of a bother than rain or drizzle. There are insulating face masks that can take some of the sting out of wind hitting your face. An outer layer that can shed the wind is really important. Wool and poly will let the wind go right through.  Layering that can actually be adjusted for the conditions is definitely the way to go, because moisture and wind, yours or nature's, is the killer.