Author Topic: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade  (Read 5126 times)

Offline LdMorgan

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Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« on: February 20, 2012, 07:38:43 PM »
Often little things can matter a lot.

One trick I picked up over the years applies when you are in a situation where you have adequate water but little or no food: You simply drink a lot of hot water.

The hotter the better. As hot as you can stand to sip it. Like hot coffee without the coffee.

The reason is this:  In addition to simple hydration, the intake of hot water supplies thermal energy directly to the core of the body, obviating the need for the body to burn "X-many" calories that would have to be drawn either from an intake of food or from stored fat and/or muscle tissue.

How many calories?

A calorie is the amount of heat needed to raise 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius.

(Hmmm. That doesn't help much!)

How about this: Let's say you drink 1 cup of water at 140 degrees Fahrenheit instead of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

So you are ingesting 1 cup of water with an extra 108 Fahrenheit degrees-worth of heat energy in it.

That comes out to 9,988.74536 calories.

So ingesting the thermal energy in that 1 cup of hot water could (theoretically) keep you from having to eat almost four 2,500-calorie meals, or from having to burn off a solid 2.85 lbs. of body fat (at 3,500 calories/lb.).

But that’s theoretical. In the real world 1 calorie of thermal energy does not precisely substitute for 1 calorie of chemical energy.

But the point is that one cup of hot water contains a surprising amount of energy, and a significant portion of that energy can be used directly by the body.

And every little bit helps, especially when it's a large bit.

Drinking hot water calms the spirit because it's a formal meal. It's Stone Soup without the stones. And it will help conserve calories when conservation matters the most.

However many, those calories might have come from beef jerky, in which case your supplies would have been expended more quickly, or they might have come from the stored reserves of your body, in which case you would have lost weight and strength faster, and starved to death sooner.

So if you drink hot water, you can hold out longer--both ways.

And a few tea bags, then, are just icing on the cake.


Offline Crusher13

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2012, 09:51:34 PM »
I agree but your calculation is off. Calories in food are actually 1000 calories in your example of the energy needed to raise the temp of water. So that 1 cup of hot water equals 10 food calories. But it does help moral to have a hot drink when cold.

Offline mxitman

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 11:16:14 PM »
what if someone wanted to lose some weight but still eat and drink the same? Would drinking cold beverages aid in the weight loss?

As a tip I have; I keep a 18" section of 1/4" annealed aluminum tubing in my camping & firestarter kits. Helps get fires going by blowing through the tube right on the coal or target area, the aluminum weighs just a few ounces and rolls up small for use over and over again. Was a trick from my dad and he used copper tubing but I have since gone to aluminum to save weight. Allot easier than blowing all over and blowing your fire or tinder ball all over the place. Can also use hollow reeds or bamboo to be period authentic ;)

Look for
Quote
Pilot Tubing
used in gas fired water heaters/furnaces.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 11:32:30 PM »
I agree but your calculation is off. Calories in food are actually 1000 calories in your example of the energy needed to raise the temp of water. So that 1 cup of hot water equals 10 food calories. But it does help moral to have a hot drink when cold.

You are ever so right!

Converting between Celsius & Fahrenheit, grams & pounds, cups and liters, I'm surprised I wasn't even further off.

Redoing the math just in kilojoules (DUH!), I got 10.555 food calories equivalent per cuppa hot.

Figure a slice of medium cooked bacon averages about 43 calories, having a good hot cup of Stoneless Soup is about the same as chomping down one forth of a slice of bacon.

Slim nibbles, but helpful.

And now I'm hungry for bacon.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2012, 11:53:07 PM »
what if someone wanted to lose some weight but still eat and drink the same? Would drinking cold beverages aid in the weight loss?

As a tip I have; I keep a 18" section of 1/4" annealed aluminum tubing in my camping & firestarter kits. Helps get fires going by blowing through the tube right on the coal or target area, the aluminum weighs just a few ounces and rolls up small for use over and over again. Was a trick from my dad and he used copper tubing but I have since gone to aluminum to save weight. Allot easier than blowing all over and blowing your fire or tinder ball all over the place. Can also use hollow reeds or bamboo to be period authentic ;)

Look for  used in gas fired water heaters/furnaces.

Actually, eating cold food and hanging out in a cool environment will both tend to contribute to weight loss. Too cold an environment, though, apparently triggers a homeostasis reflex and the body starts using the food it's getting more efficiently.

Easier just to skip that third Twinkie or maybe buy the quart rather than the gallon-size pail of ice cream.

(And now I'm hungry for ice cream. Too!)

Your tip is MEGA cool! So many times I've wanted a little precision in blowing up a spark, while not sucking in a chimney-load of smoke in the process.

I already carry a length of surgical rubber tubing in my kit for slurping rainwater out of the forks of triple-trunked oak tress, for use in a survival still, for making a couple of spare sets of slingshot bands, etc. Also for a good tourniquet.

I bet a few inches of Aluminum tubing plugged into my rubber tubing would do a bang-up job on fires. I wouldn't even have to take it out for most other uses--it would be good to go.




Offline WVMan73

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Offline TLBones

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2012, 03:05:51 PM »
Hi,
   Enjoying this thread...my physical chemistry lab class came flooding back...I remember weighing out sugar and other organic material to load in a bomb calorimeter.   The Calorie vs. calorie mistake is very common... Big C 1000x little c. 
thanks,
  TLBones

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Survival Tips: Tricks of the Trade
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2012, 03:29:31 PM »