Author Topic: Bow fishing reel?  (Read 10804 times)

Offline chad234

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Bow fishing reel?
« on: January 09, 2010, 03:49:46 PM »
Anyone have some time behind a bow fishing reel? Any suggestions for an overview into the sport?

Offline flyfisher66048

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 07:27:50 PM »
I'm not an expert, not even a good rookie.  I use an AMS reel on a bear Grizzly that is about 50 lbs at my draw length.  I always use AMS safety slides on my arrows.  You don't want an arrow getting jerked back into your eye/face.  Shoot low due to water refraction.  The deeper the fish the lower you have to aim.  I used to wade in TX and hunt for carp and gar.  I got a boat this fall that has a raised shooting platform with lights for night time shooting.  I thought it would be god for flyfishing and bow fishing.  I would love to try hunting stingrays down on the coast.  I think the stinger would make an interesting trophy.

Offline chad234

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2010, 08:37:21 PM »
Thanks for the tips. Skate is some good eating too.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2010, 05:12:08 PM »
Anyone have some time behind a bow fishing reel? Any suggestions for an overview into the sport?
Bowfishing reels are are quite varied.

For Example:



This wired on bait bucket worked well for me. 

Because some of the Gar we were hunting were pretty large, the line was attached to an empty gallon milk jug instead of the bow.

The large Gar were not kept but were shot in the head and dragged up on the beach.  We brought this small one home to photograph. 

[Before some Politically Correct Moron takes me to task for this form of varnmint hunting, understand that there was no natural preditor, and these were not native to the area were were hunting them.

The Gar were rapidly destroying the Bass populations.  We were helping bringing the ecosystem back into balance.]

There a couple of sites on the web that show how to make a bowfishing reel from PVC pipe by cutting and heating it to form into shape.

The reel I have for my bow now, is a Bear factory made reel that I have modified to thread into the front of my bow.

I have a friend who adapted a closed face spinning reel for his bow.  It works pretty well (when he remembers to press the release button).

Being able to just reel the arrow back with the crank is a lot easier than playing a fish hand over hand.

I have also seen pictures of people who have a partner with a rod and reel that the arrow is hooked up to for shooting a very large fish. 
The partner opens the reel's bale and points at the fish with the pole. The idea is once the fish is arrowed, the archer puts down his bow and plays the fish with the rod.

I've never done this so don't know how well it works.

Welcome to a great new adventure.

Steve

Offline chad234

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2010, 09:04:52 AM »
Steve- thanks for another informative answer. Is a recurve better suited to this use than a compound?

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2010, 11:32:42 AM »
Steve- thanks for another informative answer. Is a recurve better suited to this use than a compound?
Please don't get me started with Archery vs Block and Tackle arrow shooting.....

However,  as long as you have a means of keeping the fishing line from tangling with all those cams, wires, sight pins, shoulder stocks and such it should be OK to use a block and tackle.

Shooting fish is a matter of just feet, not a lot of yards..... You don't need a flat shooting bow. 

Also, because of the range, why use a heavy draw bow? 

You are going to be shooting shallow swimming fish that offer little resistance to penetration. 

A 35-40 pound bow is as good as a 90 pound monster, and a lot easier to handle.

A separate, inexpensive bent stick (Real Bow) set up solely for the purpose of fishing, isn't really a bad way to go if you plan to do a lot of bowfishing.

Also, it will be much lighter in weight.

I like real archery probably because I started shooting back in 1951, and Allen didn't invent the compound bow until the mid 1960s.

Thus, I've stayed with bent sticks of both the straight limb and recurve variety, shunning the "New Fangled" arrow drivers.

"I don't know nuthin bout em, but I'm aginn em"...





Take Care, have fun,

Steve

Offline chad234

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2010, 03:21:35 PM »
I actually have an old Bear recurve I am now motivated to get out and string. Thanks!

Offline RipTombstone

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2010, 09:37:03 PM »
Back when I was out hunting carp, I used my compound turned down to a low weight. I used a big open face reel attached to a bow stabilizer with hose clamps. All I had to do was flip the bail and wait.
I used several different lines at the time, but the best was a Kevlar fishing line. It was rated to 90 lbs or better, but was sized like a 20 pound test and had a cloth like feel to it. It lasted quite awhile, and even absorbed a few "ohcrapIforgottoflipthebail" moments.

I always drilled my arrows so that they had a hole at each end. Then attached a heavier cord to the arrow itself, and then attached my reel line to the arrow line, making it a slider. The string could be in front of the bow that way, and as the arrow left, the string was able to trail along behind the arrow, sliding backwards on the arrow string. (hope that makes sense).

RipT

Offline BatonRouge Bill

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Re: Bow fishing reel?
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2010, 12:24:47 PM »
When the salt marsh gets phosphrous from millions of minute jelly water the fish glow in the dark and are easy targets. http://www.rodnreel.com/CAJUNAIR/
I just have an old browning compound bow with a rod/reel rig I bought at Academy sports. it has a zebco 808 reel with the little 12" rod mounted where the stabilizer goes. I shoot a fiberglass arrow with 100 lb test string and a fish point. So when I'm in shallow water and the reds aren't biting but I can see them in the shallows....it's on!