Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics > Outdoors Activities

winter backpacking

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Lara:
There's a whole tent vs tarp discussion here:
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19882.0

Personally, I don't light any flame inside a tent ever.  Not only am I tying up perfectly good hemoglobin with carboxy- instead of oxy- (when I'm usually at high altitude, and could really use as much oxyhemoglobin as I can get), there's also the fact that even though they're flame retardant, tents can still burn.  I'd rather be a little cold, frankly, but to each their own.

surfivor:
 winter back packing is tough because it's harder to go ultra light. I have an insulated mattress, but it was expensive and it's a bit bulky. My sides get cold kind of easy and it effects my sciatic nerve and causes pains in my back/lower sides. This can start to happen if I spend alot of time in the cold.

These are interesting topics for general survival in SHTF as well.

 I've spent alot of time winter camping, but mostly from a car or RV.


 A 3 pound wood stove for back packing ? Now I have seen everything.  So I figured out that it is a kifaru stove. Very cool, seems like great survival gear to think about getting for winter survival/camping. Never heard of a modular sleep system before either. Great gear ideas. I have different sleeping bags, nothing modular. I wounder what are some good modular systems out there ? That supertarp has a place for the stove pipe to pass through ? Almost makes me want to go winter backpacking or something that otherwise doesn't appeal to me a whole lot.
 



 Some interesting ideas here, got to admit ..

 I bought a bag rated to 20 below zero a couple of years ago ..

 

Andy in NH:

--- Quote from: surfivor on December 19, 2010, 04:26:03 PM ---I wounder what are some good modular systems out there ?
--- End quote ---

Kifaru Regulator System


--- Quote ---That supertarp has a place for the stove pipe to pass through ?
--- End quote ---

My other picture didn't show the annex which has the stovepipe port.



surfivor:
 hey Andy,

 Those pictures are both part of the super tarp ?

 I haven't been looking to spend alot more money, but with the economic situation and all I may take out an early withdrawal from my IRA.
Some of this kifaru stuff seems like a great survivalist investment here in the northeast and as good an investment as buying gold coins. I am wondering if I should buy some of this stuff and will probably be seriously thinking about it. Makes me feel like if I took off into the woods in mid winter, I'd have half a chance to not be totally miserable if I had a little portable woodstove .. I'm not sure how long a stove like that could really last or if you could patch it if holes burned into it, but I was amazed that stuff like this is out there ..

 I went on the kifaru site and saw how the pipes roll up which was another amazing thing ..

Andy in NH:

--- Quote from: surfivor on December 19, 2010, 06:48:23 PM ---Those pictures are both part of the super tarp ?
--- End quote ---

Yes, the annex is a separate piece so that you can use the tarp itself in more temperate weather.


--- Quote ---I haven't been looking to spend alot more money.
--- End quote ---

One thing about Kifaru gear - it's pricey.  It is all made in America and they need to pay the workers an American wage.


--- Quote ---I'm not sure how long a stove like that could really last or if you could patch it if holes burned into it, but I was amazed that stuff like this is out there ..
--- End quote ---

Another thing about Kifaru gear, re: the stoves - they are very well constructed.  They are made from stainless steel.  I've never seen or heard of a stove (or stove pipe) burning through.

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