News > Current Severe Emergency Situations

Katia

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kc9eci:
For those of you with ham radios or shortwave radios, the Hurricane Watch Net frequency of 14.325 MHz USB would be a good place to listen to real time reports from people in the effected area.    More info at http://www2.fiu.edu/~w4ehw/ also, the National Hurricane Center would be another good place to gather info http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

For those of you in the area if/when it makes landfall, good luck and as we say in the fire service, stay low.

Sister Wolf:
Somebody in chat yesterday was saying that when hurricanes get big, they like to go out to sea. So the fact that Katia, who was a cat 1 hurricane yesterday, is now back down to a tropical storm worries me. Does that mean she's more likely to hit land?

endurance:

--- Quote from: Sister Wolf on September 01, 2011, 09:45:16 PM ---Somebody in chat yesterday was saying that when hurricanes get big, they like to go out to sea. So the fact that Katia, who was a cat 1 hurricane yesterday, is now back down to a tropical storm worries me. Does that mean she's more likely to hit land?

--- End quote ---
That doesn't sound right to me, otherwise how would a major hurricane ever hit land?  The truth is that hurricanes are "steered" by the prevailing winds (east to west near the equator, west to east in the mid-latitudes) and high pressure systems.  The size or intensity doesn't really matter.

The other common misnomer is that a higher intensity storm (say category 3 vs. tropical storm) is inevitably going to cause more damage.  While the more intense storm can bring higher winds and a larger storm surge, a large tropical storm that sits in one place can cause serious flooding (or in the case of Irene, hit mountainous terrain or cold air that's like wringing out a sponge) relative to a larger storm that's very fast moving.  Speed, size, and intensity should always be considered on whether to evacuate or not. 

Nicodemus:
The forecast models on Katia have changed quite a bit over the last few days. Originally it looked as if this storm wouldn't be of much worry, but now it appears that it is more likely that it could make contact with the U.S.

I like to check The Stormpulse Site. You can turn on "Forecast Models" in the the upper right hand corner of the map to see what various models are showing  for the storm's potential track.

hillclimber:
We got off lucky with Irene and never lost power, but we were on a temporary island for a while.
Think I'll grab a few beers and tinker on my generator this afternoon. Damn new gas has the carb screwed up....AGAIN.  I'll need it sooner or later anyhow, and winter is right around the corner.

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