Energy Options > Wind Power

Wind turbine

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shingman:
Thanks for all the comments. I,ll have to look into this more!

ebonearth:
HelixWind's new S594 works in 5mph wind areas averaging 1250KW/yr in that range. I just sent them an inquiry since their design is more appropriate to our needs. I will ask them about the certification status and such when I hear back as well as cost and other such pertinent details.

OJ:
I wish I could remember where I saw it, but I just read about an innovative new wind turbine that works at wind speeds as low as 2 mph.

It features blades tipped with magnets, turning inside a shroud lined with copper coils.  By integrating the generator with the blades, energy loss in the gears is eliminated.

ebonearth:

--- Quote from: OJ on November 16, 2009, 04:18:44 PM ---I wish I could remember where I saw it, but I just read about an innovative new wind turbine that works at wind speeds as low as 2 mph.

It features blades tipped with magnets, turning inside a shroud lined with copper coils.  By integrating the generator with the blades, energy loss in the gears is eliminated.

--- End quote ---
Sounds innovative and awesome and heavy and expensive. If it isn't I would be very interested.
I heard from a rep at Helix Wind this is what she stated:

Price estimates, which include grid tie inverters or charge controllers (installations & monopoles additional) Interface Module with Over-Voltage Protection required on all S series models with inverters the cost for it is $659:
-S322 - $7,500.
-S594 - $14,500.
-D361 - $11,000.

These costs are before any local or State rebates and incentives. All units are eligible for the new 30% tax credit (residential) or 30% rebate (commercial).
You can learn more about local, state and federal incentives and rebates at:  www.dsireusa.org

AtADeadRun:

--- Quote from: OJ on November 16, 2009, 04:18:44 PM ---I wish I could remember where I saw it, but I just read about an innovative new wind turbine that works at wind speeds as low as 2 mph.

It features blades tipped with magnets, turning inside a shroud lined with copper coils.  By integrating the generator with the blades, energy loss in the gears is eliminated.

--- End quote ---

It's this thing:  http://www.machine-history.com/Wind%20Turbine%20Blade%20Tip%20Power%20System

According to the specs, in Class 3 wind power density, she'll produce 2000 kWhe/year, which is relatively respectable.  If you're in a place with national-average electricity costs of about $.12/kWhe, then you're looking at $240/year savings.  Note that Class 3 wind conditions are still pretty strong, at 150-200 W/m2, or 11.5-12.5 mph at 10m (or 33 feet) above ground level.  Those conditions obtain throughout much of the Midwest and portions of the Northeast and Cali:  http://www.awea.org/faq/usresource.html.  Sure, she'll turn at 2mph, but at that amount of wind, it's not exactly making mountains of power.

Thing is, according to the Ace Hardware site selling the thing, http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3800670, it's gonna run you $6k -- $4.2k with federal tax credit -- so at $240 a year, you're talking a 17.5-year amortization on a machine that hasn't had a lot of field time to iron out possible problems.  Since she's making frequency-stable AC but not geared, that means she's either inverting in the housing or the vanes are variable-pitch, which is more stuff to break that isn't user-serviceable.

Still, your mileage may vary.  If you're living in a place that has Class 4 winds and/or can fix solid state power converters, vane control systems, and/or generators (depending on how she's set up internally), it'd be something to think about.  If I were living in a place with Class 4 winds, I'd seriously think about it for myself.  I could fix her if she broke, and it's more about the self-sufficiency than the money, though the money doesn't hurt.

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