Energy Options > Wind Power

Wind turbine

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Tinker:
Atadeadrun,
Your amortization calculation is based on a constant price per killowatt hour. Depending on which study you choose, that price may double under cap and trade.
Also, imagine you didn't have the turbine and you had to generate electricity using a gas generator. I haven't calculated it in a while but I think the cost of using a generator is an order magnitude greater than using the grid. 

AtADeadRun:

--- Quote from: Tinker on November 17, 2009, 02:26:29 PM ---Atadeadrun,
Your amortization calculation is based on a constant price per killowatt hour. Depending on which study you choose, that price may double under cap and trade.
Also, imagine you didn't have the turbine and you had to generate electricity using a gas generator. I haven't calculated it in a while but I think the cost of using a generator is an order magnitude greater than using the grid. 

--- End quote ---

Easily an order of magnitude, but that's apples to oranges.  You use a wind turbine to offset overall usage and a gas genset for emergencies, peak loads, and remote ops.  Like I said, for me, it'd be more about the self-sufficiency than the costs, but I'd be unwilling to use speculative measures like "cost per kWhe might go way up under some legislation that hasn't yet passed."

Tinker:

--- Quote ---Easily an order of magnitude, but that's apples to oranges.  You use a wind turbine to offset overall usage and a gas genset for emergencies, peak loads, and remote ops.
--- End quote ---

Yes, turbines and gensets are used for different things, and comparing their relative costs is like apples to oranges. However, in an extended grid down situation, they are both just fruit (a power source). In that situation the turbine pays for itself much more quickly.

Also, does anyone believe electricity prices are going down? If not, then the question becomes how much does one think it will go up. I think the price will likely double, maybe even quadruple, within the 17.5 years calculated. How about you?

The point I am trying to make is that a turbines value is not simply defined by some static amortization table. I think you agree since "its more about self-sufficiency and not the money" for you. Self sufficiency means not having to worry about future increased energy costs.

ebonearth:
I agree with Tinker. it should also be said that wind turbines do stick out more than roof installed solar panels. So as we all look at at wind turbines as an alternative we should keep this in mind. I think that is one of the reasons Helx Wind appeals to me, it doesn't look like a conventional wind turbine which, provided it does not generate too much noise, should appease the neighbors.

AtADeadRun:
According to the S594 website, it generates "5 dB above background," which isn't much of an answer, but it's certainly quieter than your average HAWT, which can run into the 80 dB range for consumer-level mini- and micro-turbines running outside their optimal band.  Most urban and suburban noise pollution regulations run to something like 50 dB at 50 meters.  I found a video of the thing in operation, and if the sound hasn't been tinkered with, then this is a *really* quiet unit:  Helix Wind Turbine

Unfortunately, I couldn't find a video of the Honeywell blade-tip unit in operation, since that has a peak noise level listed to which we could compare the S594.

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