Author Topic: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?  (Read 12336 times)

Offline Heavy G

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What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« on: November 26, 2009, 02:10:45 PM »
I'm new to airguns.  A friend gave me a Beeman RX1 in .20 with a Theoben gas ram.



It has a nice Bushnell 4x12 scope.  It's heavy and has an adjustable trigger that I have set to about 3 or 4 pounds if I had to guess.

I plan on using it for crows and other vermin.  Plinking too.  Maybe field target competitions.  And some cheap bench rest practice.  I'm not a super dedicated psycho airgun hobbyist.  I'm just a guy with a free gun who wants to get the most out of it that he can.

I've shot it twice.  First time I used Benjamin pellets.  The second time I used Beeman pellets.

I'm sighting it in at 25 yards.  Yes, a little far for an air rifle to be super accurate but for crows I think 25 yards is a good sight in range.

Accuracy so far (just two shootings) has not been what I expected.  Groups of about 1.5 inches with occasional fliers.  (I have been paying attention to seating the pellets flush with the breach and not nicking them with my fingernails; that cut down on the fliers.)  No detectable wind when I shot. 

I've heard stories about good pellet guns having "one hole" groups.  Is that at a couple yards instead of 25? 

My goal is to get the groups down to about 1 inch at 25 yards. 

I have about 8 kinds of Beeman pellets to experiment with.  I expect to find some that are far more accurate than others.  And just shooting it more will get me better with it.

I haven't cleaned the barrel yet.  There's some special stuff to do with airgun cleaning so I'm waiting until I learn more about it before I do it. 

But my question to y'all is: what kind of accuracy can I expect out of a good pellet gun like this?

Offline kiteflyer

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2009, 03:03:46 PM »

       Break it in a little and read this http://www.reviewcentre.com/review151632.html best of luck with it!

             kiteflyer


      http://www.reviewcentre.com/review151632.html
 


I'm new to airguns.  A friend gave me a Beeman RX1 in .20 with a Theoben gas ram.



It has a nice Bushnell 4x12 scope.  It's heavy and has an adjustable trigger that I have set to about 3 or 4 pounds if I had to guess.

I plan on using it for crows and other vermin.  Plinking too.  Maybe field target competitions.  And some cheap bench rest practice.  I'm not a super dedicated psycho airgun hobbyist.  I'm just a guy with a free gun who wants to get the most out of it that he can.

I've shot it twice.  First time I used Benjamin pellets.  The second time I used Beeman pellets.

I'm sighting it in at 25 yards.  Yes, a little far for an air rifle to be super accurate but for crows I think 25 yards is a good sight in range.

Accuracy so far (just two shootings) has not been what I expected.  Groups of about 1.5 inches with occasional fliers.  (I have been paying attention to seating the pellets flush with the breach and not nicking them with my fingernails; that cut down on the fliers.)  No detectable wind when I shot. 

I've heard stories about good pellet guns having "one hole" groups.  Is that at a couple yards instead of 25? 

My goal is to get the groups down to about 1 inch at 25 yards. 

I have about 8 kinds of Beeman pellets to experiment with.  I expect to find some that are far more accurate than others.  And just shooting it more will get me better with it.

I haven't cleaned the barrel yet.  There's some special stuff to do with airgun cleaning so I'm waiting until I learn more about it before I do it. 

But my question to y'all is: what kind of accuracy can I expect out of a good pellet gun like this?

Bryan E.

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2009, 05:43:59 PM »
This is a really nice air rifle.  I have shot one and sighted it in at 30 yards.  I was able to get one inch groups and less and that was my first time to shoot the rifle.  Probably the best pellet is going to be the Beeman FTS.  Also make sure you try the Beeman Kodiak or Kodiak Match.  These might be your best, long range pellet. 

That rifle is capable of 1" group at 50 yards.  I know of guys that have used one to kill crows at 75 yards. 

It will probably shoot best if you hold it loosely, and rest your forearm hand under the front of the stock, right in front of the trigger guard.  Hold the gun slightly loosely and let it recoil.  Don't use a death grip, but even your right hand will be a gentle grip.  You might try a straight right thumb hold instead of wrapping it around the pistol grip.  When shooting from a rest, rest the gun in your left hand and your hand on the sand bag.   

Just start practicing with the gun.  Shoot further and further as you get better and better.  20-25 yards is a good starting distance for practice but I would probably sight in further than this, more like 30 yards. 

There is a good air gun software called Chairgun.  It's a free downloaded software that will help you to plot a trajectory chart for your gun and pellet.  You need to know some basic information but it is really neat and worth your time to look into it.

For more information on your rifle, search try the yellow forum for air gun information. 

Bryan


AC

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2010, 02:22:59 AM »
You have a good gun there. I'd second the advice to try Kodiak and Kodiak Match. Greater accuracy is generally found at lower velocities, and your gun may be able to push super-light pellets to very high velocities, but a heavier pellet at say 800FPS is very authoratitive.

I've shot a .22 PISTOL that will do a half-inch group at 25 meters out of a 4-inch barrel, your rifle will do a lot better than that.

You have to learn good trigger technique, follow-through, a lot of basic shooting stuff. Airguns are very good for this. Your gun will do fine on crows, they're BIG. Head or neck shots will turn 'em off quick.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2010, 02:38:24 PM »
+1 on the break it in.  All airguns need several hundred rounds through them before they settle in.
 
Airguns are some of most accurate arms in the world because the compression system is the same every time.

However, you have a Magnum hunting airgun, not a precision soft shooting target arm. 

Don't expect one hole accuracy.. (Despite what the Beeman Catalog claims), your air rifle is built for a different purpose.

Beeman supplies great quality, and two of my air rifles are Beeman.  Just don't expect target accuracy from a Magnum.

Also, if you want top accuracy, don't go cheap on the pellets....

However, for breaking in the gun, the cheaper pellets are minute of soda can at reasonable ranges.

Shoot it a lot.  But don't let youself get sloppy.

Trigger press, not jerk when the sights look right, breath control, gripped with the same pressure every time.  etc.

An airgun can do wonders for your shooting technique if you practice properly.

For the heavy boomers like the RX1, I like the heavy Beeman Kodiak pellets for small game. 

They don't shoot as flat as the little potmetal speed demons, but handle cross winds much better and hit very hard.

Properly broken in, you can expect about 1" groups at 25 yards from your rifle if you are up to it.

One tip, check the scope mounting screws often. 

The two way recoil of spring type airguns does strange things to screws.

Take Care

Steve

Offline Heavy G

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2010, 10:22:02 AM »
Thanks, Steve.  I was starting to wonder if it was the gun or if I sucked.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2010, 12:29:56 AM »
As long as were are talking airgun accuracy, why not track the guns improvement over time?

(OK I'm Anal about accuracy), but it doesn't hurt to keep a notebook of targets fired, and make notes.

Here is a copy of the 8.5"x11" targets I print on my computer for assessment:



I bought a 250 page ream (Lifetime supply) of 65# Card Stock a while back..  Works very well for targets.

I shoot these at 10 Meters off a bench.  I can keep track of accuracy, and do other tests (Scope at different power settings, different pellets, etc.)

I also have ballistic drop targets that I shoot at ranges from 15 feet to 50 yards. 

This gives me a good indication of not only how flat a pellet shoots, but also where the pellet strikes at each range with a common POA hold.

When I'm happy with a pellet, I add it to the small label on my scope that lists the impact point in reference to my sight picture at different ranges.

Hey, its a hobby....  Airguns are meant to be fun.

Fun to set out wine bottle corks at unknown distances, and using the small cross hairs on my variable scope, estimate the range and calculate the hold over or under to get first shot hits on the corks... 

It is also handy that wine bottle corks are about as tall as a squirrel's head....  Survival hunting practice at it's best.

Hope this helps.

Steve

Offline Heavy G

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2010, 08:21:25 AM »
Thanks, Steve.  Very helpful.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: What kind of accuracy can I expect out of my airgun?
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2010, 05:12:49 PM »
<<< I also have ballistic drop targets that I shoot at ranges from 15 feet to 50 yards. 
This gives me a good indication of not only how flat a pellet shoots, but also where the pellet strikes at each range with a common POA hold.
When I'm happy with a pellet, I add it to the small label on my scope that lists the impact point in reference to my sight picture at different ranges. >>>

Forgot to include the target....

http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/3103/targetpelletrifleballis.pdf

I shoot at least four 5 shot groups at each range  (5 foot intervals from 15 feet to 150 feet) using the same point of aim for all ranges.

I average the location of the center of the group for all four groups shot at each range.

I plot these on a graph to show the ballistic curve for the tested pellet.  This allows me to choose the best zero range to sight in the rifle.

I like a zero range where the highest point of the pellet path is never above 1/2 inch higher than the cross hairs at any time.

After zeroing the sights for that range, I shoot another series of one five shot groups at ten foot intervals to confirm that I have accurately evaluated the ballistic curve.

This also will show me at what range the pellet is about 1/2 inch below the cross hairs.  That becomes my maximum point blank range for that airgun/pellet combination.

In the field, any target within that range is fired at using a center hold.  (In a true field situation, there is no way I can hold near steady enough to keep within a 1 inch circle.)

Naturally, my most accurate pellet is what my prime zero is set at.  All other pellets are evaluated with that sight setting.  Where they impact at each range compared to the "Primary" pellet is noted.

As stated before, all of this Ballistic Drop and Kentucky Windage information is put on a small label put on the side of the sights.

The label is plotted by five yard intervals from five to fifty yards, with the actual Prime Pellet zero range inserted too.

This way, I have a reference for holdover & windage out to 50 yards.

(Did I mention that I'm anal about accuracy...)

Other shooters will most likely chose a set zero range instead of my cumbersome methods....

The whole idea is to do a lot of shooting and get to know your airgun.

This is just an excuse to do that with the added benefit of having a standardized record keeping of your shooting.

Here is a rough printout of my graph.  I use the blue lines below for recording the pellet type and notes.

(Someday, I'll have to put in a data box like on my workup targets...)

http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/606/pelletdropgraph01.pdf

Quote

Hey, its a hobby....  Airguns are meant to be fun.
Fun to set out wine bottle corks at unknown distances, and using the small cross hairs on my variable scope, estimate the range and calculate the hold over or under to get first shot hits on the corks... 
It is also handy that wine bottle corks are about as tall as a squirrel's head....  Survival hunting practice at it's best.
Hope this helps.
Steve

Final note on the wine cork targets.

I stick a round toothpick in the end and stick them upright a little above the ground.

My grandsone and I have a blast.....  Who said I ever grew up??

Take Care,

Steve