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Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Food Preps => The Homebrewer's Board => Topic started by: fritz_monroe on August 28, 2009, 07:27:36 PM

Title: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 28, 2009, 07:27:36 PM
I'm planning on brewing this weekend.  I have a yeast starter going right now and will probably brew tomorrow.  I also have a pilsner that I need to bottle.  That will probably happen on Sunday.

My batch that I'll be brewing is a pumpkin ale.

Anyone else brewing this weekend?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on August 28, 2009, 07:32:01 PM
I have my cave man brewing up and running.
I have a jug of apple juice with a cup of sugar added and I have a jug of cranberry juice with sugar added. Yeast, plastic bag and rubberband, the traditional cave man brew.

Hopefully I don't die of botulism.
 ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fratermus on August 28, 2009, 07:41:26 PM
I'm planning on brewing this weekend.  I have a yeast starter going right now and will probably brew tomorrow.  I also have a pilsner that I need to bottle.  That will probably happen on Sunday.

I'll brew again next weekend.  I am working from small propagated cultures (http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/brewing/yeast.html) so it takes me about a week (streaking out on a plate, then spinning on a stirplate) to get a pitchable amount of yeast.

This summer I have been concentrating on making beer with a rural/saison culture.  Nice and tangy, horsey, very rural.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 30, 2009, 06:49:36 PM
Brewed the pumpkin ale yesterday.  I pitched the yeast late.  When I first start a batch fermenting, I put it in the stationary tub.  This morning it was chugging along.  It wasn't anything violent, just a steady ferment.  We went out for a couple hours and when I got home to check on it, I was shocked.  It was no longer bubbling, it was hissing.  The air lock was clogged.  It was lucky that I checked it or it would have blown the lid off the bucket.  I pulled the air lock, sanitised a blow off tube and installed that.  It is one of the most violent fermentations I've ever had, even more than the wheat beers that I've done.  Simply amazing.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on August 31, 2009, 09:52:52 AM
Just bottled the coffee porter. Have a bourbon porter in the secondary. Have a honey ale that needs to get done along with a Irish red. Brew buddies have a Oktoberfest that need done and tonight we are making a watermelon wine.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: liftsboxes on August 31, 2009, 01:02:39 PM
Just dissent right now.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 31, 2009, 07:25:19 PM
I guess I should have updated on the pilsner as well.  I flipped through the calendar and I found that I didn't mark it on there when I brewed.  I think it was more than 3 weeks ago, but I'm not sure.  I don't want to have any bottle bombs, so I'm waiting another week or so before I bottle.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fratermus on August 31, 2009, 08:33:28 PM
I've started writing batch number and date on the carboy with a greasepencil.  When you run long primaries (up to two months) it's easy to lose track. 



Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mngardener on September 01, 2009, 01:00:29 PM
does wine count as brewing?  ;D

If so i got a batch of beet wine that is about ready to bottle and will be starting a batch of apple in a week or two.

I am trying to get a friend started in the beer brewing but he is dragging his feet a bit.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Steve W on September 01, 2009, 09:00:12 PM
Have several small batches of Scrumpy (Hard Cider) to start on weekend.

Also a 5 gallon batch of  "Perry"  (Pear Cider) is in the works.

Use a very simple Somerset Farm House style process, but do it in absolutely clean jugs with a trapped fermentation lock.  Found that true open attempts took on mold in this area.

Hoping to get enough honey for a Meade batch too!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Burnt Hollow on September 02, 2009, 01:52:50 PM
I brewed a pilsner last weekend, it is fermenting at 46 degrees in the fridge. I need to start my pumpkin beer soon. Hopefully this weekend, but it might get pushed till after labor day because I am starting construction on our basement "tasting room" on Saturday.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mckeyes on September 10, 2009, 12:24:42 PM
Didn't brew but did get my keg pulley system completed. Needed a safe way to get my keggle lifted up to gravity feed wort through a plate chiller then into a carboy.
Finally don't have to worry about lifting a heavy boiling hot keggle.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on September 11, 2009, 05:41:57 AM
The other day I moved my pumpkin ale over to secondary.  I also bottled my pilsner.  Mine isn't actually a pilsner, it is an ale.  I don't have a set up to be able to brew a true pilsner.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Burnt Hollow on September 14, 2009, 01:07:44 PM
This weekend I moved the pilsner to secondary, and dropped the temp to 38 to Lager.

I started a holliday beer as well. I steaped 30 apples in 2 gallons of water for 30 minutes as I brought it up to boil, and then brewed with the water. Put a little cinnomen and honey. Used a lager yeast, but fermenting at about 62 degrees. Kind of experimental, we'll see what happens. I still have a 5 gallon bucket of nice juicy apples, that I'm trying to figure out what to do with. Does anyone in Denver Metro have a cider press for sale or loan? I have been looking for one of those antique cast iron cider press/sausage stuffer. If anyone knows where I can find one of those in the Denver metro area, please let me know. I want to ferment some home pressed apple cider.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on November 19, 2009, 11:15:55 AM
Been a bit the last time I was in here.
I did some watermelon wine  a couple of months ago that is aging very nice. This weekend I am thinking of doing a pumpkin wine.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: liftsboxes on November 19, 2009, 11:20:49 AM
I'm going here: www.manchesterbrewing.com (http://www.manchesterbrewing.com) this weekend to learn with the pros!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smallredbox on November 21, 2009, 08:54:42 AM
I'm currently brewing Some Mead with Cinnamon, Cloves, and Brown Sugar. Just started it last night and it is bubbling away nicely.  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on November 21, 2009, 11:35:03 AM
I finally bottled my pumpkin ale the other day.  I was hoping to have it bottled 3 weeks ago, but other things got in the way.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on November 25, 2009, 09:12:51 AM
Brewed up the pumpkin wine. Cant say it smells that well.  :D
I stuck it down in my brew buddies cellar last night and it was going to town nice. Got a good look at the meads down there that we are going to bottle real soon along with the watermelon wine that looks GREAT!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smallredbox on November 28, 2009, 06:40:24 AM
Brewed up the pumpkin wine. Cant say it smells that well.  :D
I stuck it down in my brew buddies cellar last night and it was going to town nice. Got a good look at the meads down there that we are going to bottle real soon along with the watermelon wine that looks GREAT!

Have you ever made punpkin wine before?

I was considering making some mead with pumpkins in the future.
I have dreams of making a pumpkin pie mead. doesn't that sound lovely?
(I had some pumpkin ale a year ago and it was pretty nice.)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on November 28, 2009, 07:18:43 AM
I haven't made pumpkin wine, but I recently bottled my pumpkin ale.  It's only been in the bottle for a week, so it's not ready yet.  I tasted it at bottling time.  It was pretty good, but I think I need to up the spices.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smallredbox on November 29, 2009, 06:19:38 AM
What spices did you use?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on November 29, 2009, 05:29:14 PM
I didn't have any pumpkin pie spice on hand.  So I just used fresh ground nutmeg and a couple cinnamon sticks.  I probably should have run out to the store and bought some spice mix.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Burnt Hollow on November 30, 2009, 08:38:28 AM
That should be enough spice. you don't want to be over powering. The other spices in pumpkin pie spice are cloves and ginger.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on November 30, 2009, 10:59:23 AM
Yea, I didn't have any cloves, and I'm not a big ginger fan, so that one wouldn't be missed.

I'll know in another week or so how it turns out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smallredbox on November 30, 2009, 03:38:30 PM
I look forward to hearing abotu it  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on December 01, 2009, 08:37:19 AM
Have you ever made punpkin wine before?

I was considering making some mead with pumpkins in the future.
I have dreams of making a pumpkin pie mead. doesn't that sound lovely?
(I had some pumpkin ale a year ago and it was pretty nice.)
Sorry been gone quite a bit of late.
No I never made pumpkin wine before. We just had a few pumpkins sitting around and I thought I better get something done with them or we would waste them and have to throw them out.
I just used a simple wine recipe. I didnt add any spices but I did think about cinnamon. I dont like the other spices that go into pumpkin pie such as the nutmeg. So I wouldnt use them and I love just straight pumpkin. So I just made a whirl with this and I will sneak a taste out when I rack it. It will be a few weeks for hunting right now is taking up most of my free time. Dang elk. :-\
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ronoverdrive on December 02, 2009, 08:42:46 PM
I have my cave man brewing up and running.
I have a jug of apple juice with a cup of sugar added and I have a jug of cranberry juice with sugar added. Yeast, plastic bag and rubberband, the traditional cave man brew.

Hopefully I don't die of botulism.
 ;D

Lol yeah sounds like what I'm doing except I'm using rubber balloons instead of bags & rubber bands. I got a gallon jug of apple juice and another with white grape juice with 2 cups of sugar each and 1 packet of wine yeast each. I'm hoping they're both done in a month or so in time for new years, but we'll see.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Kellib on December 06, 2009, 10:36:56 AM
We just made up our first wine, Five gallons of apple wine. It was so easy we should have started years ago.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: spartan on December 07, 2009, 11:17:12 AM
Nothing brewing, but 1 gallon of peach wine, 1 gallon of blackberry mead, and 5 gallons of apple wine. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Mr Ant on December 07, 2009, 10:21:36 PM
Just started a batch of nut brown ale. My spare bathroom smells like beer. It's a beautiful thing!  :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: AZCeltic formerly occeltic on December 27, 2009, 02:04:26 PM
Not only does this thread encourage me to break out my brewing gear, it makes me mighty thirsty! Time to head downstairs for some cold refreshment. Quick question: Is there a good home brewable beer that will keep well at unrefrigerated temperatures? I know there are some who drink beer this way, especially in Europe, so there must be a method for keeping it fresh.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Angry.mitro on December 27, 2009, 10:54:23 PM
apricot mead and a juniper berry porter
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on December 28, 2009, 08:33:16 AM
Not only does this thread encourage me to break out my brewing gear, it makes me mighty thirsty! Time to head downstairs for some cold refreshment. Quick question: Is there a good home brewable beer that will keep well at unrefrigerated temperatures? I know there are some who drink beer this way, especially in Europe, so there must be a method for keeping it fresh.
The saying goes. The darker the beer the warmer it should be served. But I have found that any beer down on a basement floor or cellar floor will have a chill to it that I can drink. Unless it is that bud, miller, coors crap.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mxitman on December 28, 2009, 11:57:23 AM
I just finished up 2 batches i did back to back, Thats allot of beer my wife said..lol  ;D Uhh yeah I'm sure it will last a long time ;). I did a red ale and a stout that I'm going to put into a keg and serve it on a nitrogen tap, i'm pretty excited about that, I wanted to do it last year but never did. I'm a Commercial HVAC mechanic and we use nitrogen all the time so I have all the gear for it already... I'll let you know how it turns out!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: AZCeltic formerly occeltic on December 28, 2009, 09:51:30 PM
Dark beer is good, dark beer is our friend. It seems that I've had a Guinness or two that wasn't all that cold yet was still refreshing. I guess I was wondering if refrigerated beer lasts longer than non refrigerated beer. There must be an optimum storage temperature that will keep it fresh. You know, now that I think of it, I see cartons of beer stacked up in the grocery store. Of course it is usually in the mid 50's in our grocery store. ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Crux Move on March 26, 2010, 02:40:44 AM
Where can I get a good recipe for Blackberry Mead.  I live in the NW and will soon have a plethora of Blackberries and Jam, Jelly, and syrup i got down, so mead is then next logical step.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 26, 2010, 07:41:40 AM
Blackberry mead sounds really good.  I came across the following recipe that sounds good, but I've never made one so can't really say.

Quote
Yeast: Lalvin K1-V1116 Yeast Starter: no Batch Size (Gallons): 5 Original Gravity: 1.098 Final Gravity: 0.998

5 gallon batch

First, freeze 8 pounds blackberries (fresh preferrable). More is okay too I would think.

12 lbs Clover honey
water to 5 gallons

I pasteurized at near-boil temps while skimming foam off the top, about 15 minutes.

9/7/08: Added 4.5 teaspoon yeast nutrient, pitched yeast (Lalvin K1-V1116). OG=1.098
week 1: 1.064, added 1 tspn nutrient
week 2: 1.026
week 3: 1.008. Racked to secondary onto 7 pounds of thawed & crushed blackberries, plus 1.5 tspn nutrient. Topped off to 5 gallons with water.
week 4: 0.998, racked off blackberries to secondary.
week 8: racked to tertiary for clearing.

Bottled on 12/6/2008. I added another pound of crushed blackberries at bottling (soaked in the bottling bucket for .5 hours in a bag).

For still: Add stabilizer, wait one week, add 1 cup honey, bottle.
For sparkling: Add 2/3 cup honey, bottle immediately (beer or champagne bottles).

I just tried the sparkling mead (melomel) after 1 month in the bottle, and it's very, very good. Light carbonation, good blackberry and honey aroma. Color is light pink. Highly recommended. This went over really, really well at a NYE party!
 

I have a local bee keeper and I'd like to get started keeping bees, but I need to get approval from the wife.  So should get started with mead.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: OKGranny on March 26, 2010, 01:34:28 PM
That blackberry mead sounds delicious.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on March 26, 2010, 02:17:32 PM
Tonight I'm going to bust out my Mr. Brew that I got from my wife for Christmas.  I don't expect much out of it but it should be interesting at least.  My last (and only) batch of brew was about 12 years ago and had so much alcohol I got tipsy off of two bottles.  Or maybe I was just not conditioned, considering I hadn't gone through college yet...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mckeyes on March 29, 2010, 07:35:03 AM
kegged up a vanilla stout over the weekend and my bourbon stout will be ready next weekend.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Mr Ant on March 29, 2010, 06:24:52 PM
kegged up a vanilla stout over the weekend and my bourbon stout will be ready next weekend.

I love a good Vanilla stout. That may have to be one of my next batches. I just bottled a wheat ale that was made with lime peel and coriander. It sounded like it would make a good summer beer. Fingers crossed.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jetta2337 on March 30, 2010, 11:09:14 AM
Blackberry mead sounds really good.  I came across the following recipe that sounds good, but I've never made one so can't really say.
 

I have a local bee keeper and I'd like to get started keeping bees, but I need to get approval from the wife.  So should get started with mead.
Here is the base of what I use and how I do it.

Making the must for the beginning mead maker
12 pounds honey
12 pounds fruit
Yeast
yeast Activator
With a touch of Irish Moss.
1 lemon
Sugar

•   Boil five gallons of water
•   Let cool down to 185 degrees DO NOT BOIL AFTER THIS POINT!!!!!
•   Add honey
•   Stir in honey then add some irish moss
•   Take out crap that comes to top with fine strainer
•   add fruit
•   Squeeze the juice of one lemon into a measuring cup, remove any seeds, and add it to the must.
•   let the temp hang out around 175 for 15 minutes DON’T BOIL!
•   Cool down to 80 degrees
•   Put yeast nutrient in fermenter add must
•   Add 5 teaspoons of sugar
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: oley454 on March 31, 2010, 06:32:31 PM
Brewed an Irish Red Ale and it turned out awesome.  A lot better than the English bitter I tried three months ago.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: cjhuey on April 02, 2010, 09:06:57 PM
I bottled a Amber Ale with iced oatmeal cookies last week.  I brewed a IPA this evening.  I plan on brewing a barley wine at the end of the month and ageing it until Christmas.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on April 03, 2010, 02:51:23 PM
In January 2003, I brewed up a apple cherry melomel.  I used Welch's apple cherry juice concentrate.  I bottled it in January 2004.  I don't know what happened to the other couple bottles, but I opened the last one that I had.  It turned out pretty tasty.  I've heard that meads need to mellow for a couple of years, I think that 6 years was plenty of time to mellow out.

I'll be contacting the local bee keeper to see what he will charge me for some honey.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: wolfracer on April 03, 2010, 03:57:58 PM
I've got a english brown ale in the fermentor right now. Need to bottle it this weekend. Maybe tommorrow.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Kellib on May 02, 2010, 05:04:30 PM
Just started our first batch of Strawberry wine, should be ready in about 6-8 months. A long wait and while we wait we will be drinking our apple wine, plum wine, and wheat beer among others. mmmmmm I see a great summer ahead  ;) ;)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: oley454 on May 14, 2010, 05:18:23 PM
Brewing a pale ale on Sunday, third time brewing hope it turns out like my second batch and not the first
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: bkt on May 15, 2010, 09:13:10 AM
I'm just getting back into brewing, but I kicked off a batch of mead (plain, orange blossom) a week and a half ago.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: liftsboxes on May 15, 2010, 10:00:19 AM
A plug for my friends at www.manchesterbrewing.com (http://www.manchesterbrewing.com)

They are starting up their School of Brewing again.  If you're in New England and want a strong class to get you started making decent quantities of brew, this might be a worthwhile course.  His message follows:


Subject: Return of the School of Beer


Hi!

We're starting up the School of Beer at Manchester Brewing in Concord, NH again, and we've got some great new stuff to tell you about! We've built a mill, and are working on a carbonator and cooler that you can make for much, much cheaper than you can buy. Plus, we've found a new start up company that makes brewhouses in the 2 barrel size, for so much less than the big guys, that you might not even NEED to worry about financing!

Plus the syllabus now includes instructions about how to build your glycol system, and info about making your own kegwasher.

We'll cover all the equipment you'll need, plus federal, local, and state regs to watch for, and show you how to design your own microbrewery or brewpub. There's information about sourcing and financing too, of course, as well as an introduction to lots of the brewing equipment you'll encounter.

You get the syllabus and much of the information on a USB drive, so it's easy to access when you need it.

The class will be held on May 29th, Saturday, from 9:00 to 4:00 pm and includes lunch. There will be plenty of time to answer your questions, as usual. The class is held at Manchester Brewing, 119 Old Turnpike Road 3G, Concord, NH. The cost is $415 and that covers you and one partner. We accept credit cards via Paypal, the email address to pay is brewer@manchesterbrewing.com and the Registration Deadline is May 27th.

There will be another session on June 19, Saturday, if you can't make the May class. Class sizes are limited. I'm sending this to our Facebook members just in case you're interested.  Please email any questions!

Cheers,

brewer@manchesterbrewing.com
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: operator on May 18, 2010, 08:22:25 AM
I've got four 5 gallon jugs of wine going right now.  I couldn't wait for the fresh fruits so I tried e few new recipes.  Brown Sugar and raisins.  Ginger root.  Cornmeal.  And I did pick some dandelions and put some strawberries and oranges with them.  The first three are working in the jugs with airlocks set.  The dandelion is settling now.  I'm going to turn the cornmeal and brownsugar into brandy (at least half of it).  Got seven jugs empty waiting for some fruit to get ripe.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on May 18, 2010, 08:43:36 AM
Cornmeal???  Never heard of doing that.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: operator on May 18, 2010, 09:00:36 AM
Edit by moderator;
Specific discussions of distilling alcohol for human consumption are in violation of the Terms of Service of The Survival Podcast Forum, as that activity is illegal in the US.
Thanks, HoC
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on May 31, 2010, 12:38:13 PM
I have a Rauchbier in the brew kettle right now.  I know it is out of season, but I've never been one to stick to that stuff.  Although I will likely make a Belgian Wit in the next couple weeks, as soon as the Rauchbier is out of the primary.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: chrisdm8 on July 17, 2010, 08:53:55 PM
Just bottled my first batch of wine ... 21 bottles of maple sap wine. Sap was from our trees during maple syrup season. It tastes pretty good ... we'll see what happens with some aging.

Also started my first batch of beer ... I got a Dunkelweizen kit from the local home-brew store.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on November 13, 2010, 09:59:47 PM
I have a 5 gallon batch of raspberry melomel in the secondary right now.  Going to wait almost another two months before bottling and will probably rack it twice in the meantime.

Also, I just started a batch of American Brown Ale.  It's an extract brew with some grain adjuncts and it smelled delicious when boiling the wort.  It took 3 gallons of cold water and 20 lbs of ice in a water bath to cool it down to 80 degrees in 45 minutes so I'm pretty sure my next investment will be an immersion chiller.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mckeyes on November 15, 2010, 06:10:06 AM
Brewed a double batch of pumpkin ale yesterday for the holidays. Entire house smelled like pumpkin and beer.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on November 20, 2010, 12:26:37 PM
I have three projects going right now...

Apfelwein (1 gallon) using EdWort's recipe: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/edworts-apfelwein-33986/ (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/edworts-apfelwein-33986/) (in secondary)
Beaujolais (5 gallon) from concentrate. Just racked it into a 5 gallon glass carboy today.
Concord wine (1 gallon) from the recipe here: http://www.alabrew.com/ (http://www.alabrew.com/) (in primary)

I did not order the pectic enzymes recommended for the concord wine, so proceeded without that particular recipe item. Any idea how much this will affect my success?

Also ordered a kit for Noble Trappist Ale for my husband to try out beer brewing. http://www.midwestsupplies.com/noble-trappist-ale.html (http://www.midwestsupplies.com/noble-trappist-ale.html)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on November 21, 2010, 09:24:23 AM
Lvschant, I'm pretty much a newb to homebrewing but I can say that I didn't add pectinase to my melomel when adding the fruit and ended up with over a gallon of pulp in the bottom which may or may not clear and settle.  I did add it just recently but tve heard the effectiveness is diminished with high alcohol content.  So add it sooner rather than later.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on November 21, 2010, 11:38:10 AM
Thanks, JB. I'll order some!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on November 28, 2010, 04:03:15 PM
Bottled the American brown ale and racked a double chocolate stout to a secondary over the weekend.  Got the supplies to do a partial mash dunkelweisen (deathbrewer's recipe from the home brew talk forums).  Can't wait to taste this stuff.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Storm on November 29, 2010, 06:33:38 AM
Getting ready to brew a clover honey mead and a melomel and order some larger carboys for bigger batches.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on November 29, 2010, 07:09:04 AM
hey everyone - I was going to wait until this brew was finished to report back on how it came out - it's my first "totally home made" recipe - if you're interested here it is - if you're cautious, I'll report back after Christmas to let you know how it turned out!
Sinjin's Spiced Stout
Fermentables:
3.5 lbs Muntons Irish Stout Style Malt Extract
1 lb. Muntons Dark Dried malt extract
.5 lb. chocolate malt
3 lbs dextrose
Other Ingredients in the recipe:
2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1.5 oz. fresh grated ginger
2 tsp. ground nutmeg
Yeast
Using two separate three boiling pots, bring 1 gal H2O to boil in two and enough water to steep the chocolate malt in the third. In the first two, once at boil add Irish Stout Style Malt Extract and Dark Dried malt extract to one and Dextrose to the other (keeping darks with darks) – maintain rolling boil without overflow. Boil for 30 minutes.
Add 1 oz. fresh grated ginger, 2 tsp. ground cinnamon, and 2 tsp. ground nutmeg in last
15 minutes of boil.
Fill 5 gal bucket (primary fermenter) with 2 gal of cold water. Place bucket in “ice bath” and add the “dark” then “clear” pots of wort. Finally, add steeped chocolate malt.
Meantime, pitch your yeast (1/4 cup sugar in warm water with yeast for 10-15 min).
After cooling to 80 degrees, add pitched yeast, close cover and set in cool, dark corner for 2 weeks.
Before bottling simmer 1 oz cranberry extract, .5 tsp cinnamon, (simmer for 5 minutes) add to the bottling bucket.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: megajoel on December 09, 2010, 04:27:11 PM
I have a 3 Lagers and a Blonde and a Ginger beer brewing. 25 Gallons in all.
I'm testing using honey instead of dextrose; I got it from a organic neighbour.

I've ordered some Hop seeds to start growing this spring; as well as barley and wheat. Then, when I've figured out yeast cultivation, I'll be one step closer to being "beer sufficient". :D

Does anyone here brew it all themselves without any store bought items?

-Joel
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 22, 2010, 10:56:50 PM
Bottled the chocolate stout about 10 days ago, tried one today and very little carbonation so far.  More time is needed for that.  Today I racked the dunkelweizen to a secondary.  I've named it El Hefe.  I also got ingredients to make a Sierra Nevada pale ale clone partial mash. 

While at the depot for some plumbing stuff I decided to get a 50 foot 3/8" copper tubing, fittings, and some hose and fasioned a wort chiller.  Tested it in 5 gallons of boiling water and it chilled to 80 degrees in 10 minutes so it was a success.  Saved about $35 versus buying a comparable model at the home brew supply store.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 24, 2010, 08:24:04 AM
Bottled the chocolate stout about 10 days ago, tried one today and very little carbonation so far.  More time is needed for that.  Today I racked the dunkelweizen to a secondary.  I've named it El Hefe.  I also got ingredients to make a Sierra Nevada pale ale clone partial mash. 

While at the depot for some plumbing stuff I decided to get a 50 foot 3/8" copper tubing, fittings, and some hose and fasioned a wort chiller.  Tested it in 5 gallons of boiling water and it chilled to 80 degrees in 10 minutes so it was a success.  Saved about $35 versus buying a comparable model at the home brew supply store.



would love to see pictures of that wort chiller...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on December 24, 2010, 10:07:56 AM
snuck a taste of the spiced stout last night (about 2 days earlier than ideal) - if anyone was thinking about my recipe - cut the ginger by about a third - strong taste and aroma - otherwise, a most excellent brew!
Best of everything to you my fellow brewers!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: cmxterra on December 24, 2010, 07:33:11 PM
I've got 6 gallons of mead that I just racked.. Should be ready to bottle in April
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 25, 2010, 01:29:50 AM
would love to see pictures of that wort chiller...

Your wish is my command:

(http://imgur.com/BbAD4.jpg)

I used a #10 can to help wind the coil.  Put it in the middle of the large coil I got from the store then started forming the shape.  It is about one and a half cans high and slightly taller than my boil kettle so I may end up cutting a few of the top coils off and rework it with better fittings, courtesy of a gift card to the depot I just got for Christmas :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 25, 2010, 12:53:36 PM
+1, JB. My husband wants to make one of his own to try out beer brewing. Thanks a bunch!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Storm on December 25, 2010, 06:13:52 PM
I've not done any beer brewing and thought I might, but what is the wort chiller for exactly?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 25, 2010, 08:23:37 PM
I believe experienced beer brewers like to use it to cool down the wort quickly. We don't have one yet and are planning to use ice and water (as needed to cool to the appropriate temp) for the additional liquid needed instead of a wort chiller on our first batch.

Please correct me you experienced brewmasters if I have described its use incorrectly (or not completely). I was looking at the Midwest site at their offerings. For a stainless steel chiller, it runs about $50 plus S&H; for the copper models, they run from $65 - $75 plus S&H. Making one seems like a great alternative. The $65 model described it as having 25 ft. of copper tubing.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on December 25, 2010, 09:40:58 PM
Brewing newb here, but from what I gather, your wort is most vulnerable to contamination from the time it finishes boiling until the time you get it down to temp for pitching yeast (80-100 degrees) and get the fermenter sealed.  The faster you can bring the 5 gallon batch down, the less chance of contamination.  I have the stainless steel model and it works beautifully.  I just bottled a European Pilsner tonight, which I lagered, and my first 1 gallon batch of mead.  Still have 10 gallons (5-maple boch and 5-lonestar clone) in carboys in fridge and also have 5 gallons of cider in primary fermenter.  Lonestar is going into a keg, so that should be done soon too.  Just gotta wait and see what time our Noreaster arrives tomorrow afternoon. ;D 7-14 inches with winds up to 45mph.  Hang on everybody
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 25, 2010, 09:59:43 PM
I've not done any beer brewing and thought I might, but what is the wort chiller for exactly?

As LvsChant said and to also help with the cold break.  Chilling your wort faster causes particulates (proteins, small bits from the mash, hops and clearing agents) to precipitate faster and clear the resulting brew.  It's not necessary to chill fast to make a good beer, but it does decrease the chance of contamination and make it look better.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Storm on December 26, 2010, 06:19:15 PM
I see. Thanks for the clarification. I may try a beer some time, but I don't drink much beer in any case, so don't know much about it. Maybe if I brewed my own, I'd have more use for it. I still need the rest of my stuff for my mead. >.< Christmas took my money.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fratermus on December 27, 2010, 08:19:41 AM
As LvsChant said and to also help with the cold break. 

And decreases the amount of retained DMS during the still-hot-but-not-boiling timeframe , and can shave non-trivial amounts of time devoted to brewing.

I use the water hose to get the temps down to about 100F, then start an icewater recirc powered by a cheap fountain pump to pull down to pitching temps.  The cast-off water (about 25gals total) is to refill the birdbath, water the garden, fill the washing machine, etc.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fratermus on December 27, 2010, 08:25:11 AM
I may try a beer some time, but I don't drink much beer in any case, so don't know much about it. Maybe if I brewed my own, I'd have more use for it. I still need the rest of my stuff for my mead. >.< Christmas took my money.

One excuse to try a few test batches is they won't tie up your gear for long.  Beer (especially moderate-alcohol beers like milds, bitters, weizens) can be table-ready in a few weeks (5 or so - two weeks primary, three weeks carbing in bottle).  That's an eyeblink in mead timelines.  :-)

I have a few mead test batches I did and I open a bottle from each every year.  One of them (that I racked onto blackberries during secondary) is doing pretty good after about 3 yrs.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 27, 2010, 11:41:05 AM
I agree... I have one 5-gallon carboy full of wine that will needs to stay there for another 6 weeks before bottling. I am thinking we can brew up a batch of beer that is ready to drink leaving all the equipment ready to start another batch of wine before that. We have an empty carboy right now (seems crazy to have one sitting idle, right?).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 27, 2010, 01:36:38 PM
Tell me about it...I have made 3 batches of beer with one brewing now since I started my mead and it needs another month or two before going to bottle.  Friends keep trying to plan a mead party...they are confused as to why it takes so long, and assume that I'll be willing to share all that mead in one sitting.  It needs to be enjoyed over time! 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 28, 2010, 07:33:27 AM
We started a batch of beer yesterday... Noble Trappist Ale (from Midwest Supplies). I did not open the box and immediately put the yeast in the refrigerator when it arrived and am wondering if we perhaps could have yeast that is not viable... any guesses from the more experienced? We cooled the boil down very well using about 10 lbs of ice (quite effective, btw) and then poured the yeast in. (This was a Wyeast, which we short-cutted the recommended method on -- we mixed the inner packet with the main packet only about 3 hours before tossing it in to the cooled boil). No bubbling activity yet as of this morning. The folks at Midwest said it would likely take longer to get going without the recommended yeast prep.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 28, 2010, 09:22:42 AM
We started a batch of beer yesterday... Noble Trappist Ale (from Midwest Supplies). I did not open the box and immediately put the yeast in the refrigerator when it arrived and am wondering if we perhaps could have yeast that is not viable... any guesses from the more experienced? We cooled the boil down very well using about 10 lbs of ice (quite effective, btw) and then poured the yeast in. (This was a Wyeast, which we short-cutted the recommended method on -- we mixed the inner packet with the main packet only about 3 hours before tossing it in to the cooled boil). No bubbling activity yet as of this morning. The folks at Midwest said it would likely take longer to get going without the recommended yeast prep.

Did the yeast packet swell up?  I used one for my stout, crunched it two hours before pitching and it was already swollen.  The fermenter took a full 24 hours to start bubbling. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 28, 2010, 01:16:30 PM
It did not noticeably swell up... thus the concern :(

However, we don't keep our house terribly warm in winter, so that may have been a factor. We are seeing some signs of activity in the fermenter 16 hours later... although the bubbler is not yet bubbling, the lid is raised up a bit (domed slightly), so we are hopeful.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on December 29, 2010, 06:16:51 PM
The lid domed is a good sign, I've had it take 2-3 days for some to really get rockin'.  I've found the cooler winter temps really do tend to slow things down.  Is there a place where you can move it to where it will see a warmer room temp?  Whatever you do, don't give up, as there are always remedies to try if it doesn't take off.

I racked my cider to secondary today.  OG was 1.080 and today was 1.000.  I think they Wyeast cider yeast really like the brown sugar!! ;D  Still pretty cloudy, but I'm thinkin another month or two with a few more rackings.  Anyone else done cider?  This is my first try and a 5 gallon batch to boot.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 29, 2010, 07:58:06 PM
Thanks for the encouragement... I got a little discouraged by the lack of activity today and went ahead and ordered an extra packet of dry yeast from Midwest. I figured it would be better to have it here by the time we need it than wait...

Then, this evening, we can see definite signs of activity. The domed lid and the occasional bubble look very good. Anyway, we'll have the spare yeast in case of a future need.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 29, 2010, 09:40:33 PM
Did you aerate the wort after you chilled it?  The cool temps will definitely make things slow, but that really shouldn't be a problem if they're reasonable, say above 60 degrees.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 30, 2010, 09:44:45 AM
We did aerate the wort... pouring produced a lot of bubbles, then we used a sanitized whisk... The temp where the bucket sits is about 65-70 degrees, so we are hoping for good things. It's much cooler than that in the basement, so it sits in prime counterspace in the kitchen (thank goodness beer brewing is pretty quick!).

Btw, we were surprised at how well the ice worked to cool the wort after the boil. It only took about 10 lbs to cool down the 2 1/2 gallons (and it happened much more quickly than a wort chiller would have -- within a very few minutes). Then we added water to the appropriate volume at room temp.

Question about the wort chiller. The only real advantage I can see in using one is if you increase the volume of water added for the boil. Do most experienced beer brewers (who also are in possession of a wort chiller) boil the entire volume of water with a better result?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on December 30, 2010, 10:52:04 AM
Regarding boil volume, most experienced brewers typically do a full boil.  This is because when going all grain you naturally end up with 6+ gallons of wort after the sparge.  Also, full volume boils allow all the hops alpha acids to be utilized fully.  And...this is something I just heard yesterday...doing high gravity (low volume) boils can reduce the amount of proteins available for head retention and lacing (the head's equivalent of legs found in wine).

You could technically ice bath a 5 gallon full boil.  But it's more complicated logistically than simply turning a hose on low for 10 minutes.  Plus it requires a lot of ice.

So how is that batch doing now?  Surely if it was going to take off it would have already.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on December 30, 2010, 01:18:45 PM
Oh yeah... it's bubbling nicely and giving off a nice aroma. We'll probably make a few batches this way before deciding to invest in a wort chiller... (at least if the results are good, that is).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Travis on January 01, 2011, 08:15:22 AM
The lid domed is a good sign, I've had it take 2-3 days for some to really get rockin'.  I've found the cooler winter temps really do tend to slow things down.  Is there a place where you can move it to where it will see a warmer room temp?  Whatever you do, don't give up, as there are always remedies to try if it doesn't take off.

I racked my cider to secondary today.  OG was 1.080 and today was 1.000.  I think they Wyeast cider yeast really like the brown sugar!! ;D  Still pretty cloudy, but I'm thinkin another month or two with a few more rackings.  Anyone else done cider?  This is my first try and a 5 gallon batch to boot.

Brown sugar sounds interesting in there.  I've just started making cider this summer and have, since then, finished 25 gallons (drank probably 19 of them).  I have nine gallons fermenting now.

My first batch turned out way too sweet for me, and I think I killed the yeast when bottling by not letting the priming sugar/water solution cool down enough, so it's mostly flat.  My later batches have turned out very drinkable.  Crisp, dry and super gassy like sparkling wine.

What kind of apple cider did you start with?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: pamela on January 01, 2011, 11:58:44 AM
I'm a winemaker so I have some elderberry wine going. I started some elderberry bushes a few years ago and this year they really had a great harvest. Now let's hope the wine turns out good.  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on January 01, 2011, 12:03:50 PM
Wonderful! Be sure to tell us your results. I'm hoping to plant some berry bushes on our homestead and hope that elderberry will do well. So far, my only foray into winemaking has involved the use of purchased juices, so using the fresh fruit is still on my list of things to learn. How much do you have brewing?

(The beer is also smelling very "beer"-y... a good homebrew smell -- we stop by and take a whiff each time we pass by the big bucket of beer on the kitchen counter).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Storm on January 01, 2011, 12:43:31 PM
I'm still waiting to get some more cash to make another order from Midwest. I've got my two 1-gallon jugs I'll be using to make a couple small batches of mead, but I'd kind of like to try some thing larger and eventually a beer even though I don't drink much beer.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on January 03, 2011, 11:57:12 AM
Brown sugar sounds interesting in there.  I've just started making cider this summer and have, since then, finished 25 gallons (drank probably 19 of them).  I have nine gallons fermenting now.

My first batch turned out way too sweet for me, and I think I killed the yeast when bottling by not letting the priming sugar/water solution cool down enough, so it's mostly flat.  My later batches have turned out very drinkable.  Crisp, dry and super gassy like sparkling wine.

What kind of apple cider did you start with?

Travis, my recipe said nothing about heating, so I just stirred everything together at room temp and off it went.  The cider I started with is a brand called Zeigler's from PA.  Its ingredients include:Apples, Potassium Sorbate (to maintain freshness) and Malic (apple) acid per the label.  Was hoping to get some fresh local cider, but I was a little late in starting.  Today, I started a 2 gallon batch of blackberry wine.  I didn't have quite enough blackberries (8#) so I used the 6 that I had and 2# of mulberries.  Kinda looking forward to see how this turns out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on January 08, 2011, 03:19:45 PM
Well... we racked the beer (Trappist Ale) last night. Since we are boneheads and didn't let the Wyeast get going in advance of starting, it took a couple of extra days to get the yeast going. My husband tried a sample of it after we did a hydrometer check. He says it tastes really excellent... not like any bottled beer he has had here in the U.S., but similar to some of the German brews he recalls from our time over there.

I also tried out a glass of my first experiment -- the apple wine made from apple cider. It is still a bit harsh and has a bit more of a yeasty taste than I think would be ideal, but not bad at all. It is a nice clear color and has a definite scent of apples when you inhale before the sip. It is very strong (I could tell almost immediately), so I cut it with some carbonated water... very good indeed.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jaegersapper on January 09, 2011, 05:08:14 PM
I'm new to the brew.

The first batch I did was a red ale, turned out great.  A little saddened that there are only a few bottles left.

I just transferred my second batch (a Oktoberfest) to the secondary this afternoon.  It smelled great.

I need to get on a better schedule, I will run out of the first batch before the second one is ready to drink.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on January 18, 2011, 10:53:28 PM
OK... the beer (trappist ale) is bottled and one carboy and the primary fermenter are both empty... time to plan the next project. We got 52 bottles on the first batch of beer. The beaujolais is still sitting in a carboy... bottling to be in February.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Woody Borghini on January 18, 2011, 11:23:32 PM
I'm brewing kombucha. I know, I'm a hippy.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: chrisdm8 on January 19, 2011, 04:57:42 AM
I'm brewing whiskey barrel stout and Munnich Helles lager.

Stout is in the secondary and lager in the primary. I found out our old farm house is drafty enough with the uninsulated crawlspace that our pantry is consistently at lagering temps in the winter. ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on January 19, 2011, 07:20:32 AM
We need more empty beer bottles :) We were looking through the brew catalog from midwest and trying to decide what should be next... good idea about brewing the types that need a cooler brewing temp, chrisdm8. Thanks.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mckeyes on January 20, 2011, 06:21:59 AM
Brewed a chocolate coffee stout over the weekend. It's been 5 years since I last made it.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on January 20, 2011, 06:28:30 AM
Brewed a chocolate coffee stout over the weekend. It's been 5 years since I last made it.
That sounds good!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on January 20, 2011, 11:31:14 AM
We need more empty beer bottles :)

LvsChant, what I've done in the past is go out and buy a brand of beer that I enjoy with non-twist caps and reuse the bottles.  Michelob Lager and Sam Adams are a couple that come to mind for me.  Kills 2 birds with one stone.  :D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on January 20, 2011, 01:44:22 PM
I goofed and bought 2 12-packs of Yuengling, only to discover they had twist tops once we opened the carton. We have saved Sam Adams bottles...

Thanks for the tips.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on January 20, 2011, 04:05:03 PM
I've got a blackberry melomel going that is about 12 days old now.  15lbs honey, 10lbs blackberries, yum!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: trustmrtwo on January 22, 2011, 10:55:41 AM
Just started my first home brew ever. Im making 4 gallons of cider. I took 4 gallons of cider and put in 2 cups honey, 6oz of molasses and then pitched the yeast. Been in the primary for 6 days.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: megajoel on January 24, 2011, 01:38:43 PM
I've started to switch from extract beer kits to all-grain (to work on my 2011 goal of beer from scratch). My local home-brew store actually has in-house all-grain kits (malted barley, hops and instructions). So I am working on my first chocolate ale. It was more involved for setting up and brewing but it seems like its fermenting really well. I also started a British Bitter (extract kit).
Meanwhile my honey lager has been in it's secondary fermentor for 3 months now and ready to bottle; instead of sugar I used local organic honey. It smells really good. Bottling it this aft.
I also have another Lager that has been fermenting for 2 months. It's ready now but I'm going to let it sit for a bit while I empty a few bottles. ;D

I'm drinking one of my Coopers Blond kits right now. Dang good stuff.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on January 24, 2011, 06:26:30 PM

I'm drinking one of my Coopers Blond kits right now. Dang good stuff.

My 2nd batch I brewed was the Coopers Canadian Blonde.  It was also the first beer I kegged and we all loved that beer.  I think I need to make that again..... :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on February 13, 2011, 09:32:40 PM
So... the first batch of beer was a success, but not as much carbonation as my husband would like... we are guessing the amount of sugar added before bottling should be (very slightly) increased? Have to check out the beer brewing book before we try it again.

We also bottled up the Beaujolais this evening. 25 bottles (plus about 1/2 bottle that was left over). I did taste it between the carboy and the bottles (required step, iirc). It is still a little rough, but hoping it will smooth out in the next month or two.

I have a merlot kit ready to go, as well as a bitter ale kit for the next beer batch. This brewing thing is good fun. (hic)

We bought an automatic siphon setup... well worth it! Not too expensive and way less muss.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on February 15, 2011, 11:08:22 PM
I've been a busy bee recently but haven't posted in a while.  I made an American pale ale that tastes fantastic - think Sierra Nevada Pale Ale but stronger and more malty with some fruity notes.  Also made an extra IPA, 7.2 ABV, with a nice ruby color (still bottle conditioning though the sample tasted awesome).  Got another batch of my pale ale that has been refined to be a bit lighter.  Ordered ingredients for a robust porter that will hopefully be brewed this weekend.  As for the blackberry mead, it is in secondary with some Hungarian oak.  My first mead, the raspberry melomel, is bulk aging in a 3 gallon carboy not to be touched for 5 more months.  Mmmmmm tasty.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Travis on February 17, 2011, 03:49:40 PM
Brewed a stout from a kit and am going to add some black cherry juice concentrate at bottling time.  Maybe I should refer to bottling time as kegging time.  I acquired five corny kegs for free.  So I need to figure out what to do with them now so they can hold beer or cider and then figure out what I need to dispense beer or cider.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on February 20, 2011, 11:41:12 AM
Today we are brewing an English bitters kit from Midwest.

We also bottled the concord grape wine that I started a couple of months ago. It has a bit sweeter taste than the apple wine I made from cider. It also has a very slight bit of fizz. We immediately thought that it would be perfect for using to make sangria for the summer...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Mars24 on February 20, 2011, 01:04:25 PM
I've got a batch of traditional mead that's been in carboy for about 8 months.  I'll bottle this summer sometime, and open the first for tasting around Christmas.  My first attempt at mead.

I'll spend time today to pick out my next beer.  It will have to be a lager, because like chris8dm, my house is rather drafty.  My pantry will stay consistent at about 55-58 until June.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on February 20, 2011, 01:43:47 PM
I hope your mead turns out very well. It is such a long wait to find out... I haven't yet tried my hand at mead, but am looking forward to doing that in the future.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Roamer on February 23, 2011, 05:12:25 PM
Going to brew beer my first in about 10 years. Got an IPA kit. Got the yeast into a flask this afternoon. I am going to try a
simpler way of brewing this time that my local homebrew shop told me about.

I am only going to boil 2 gallons for the full hour instead of the 6 I used to do. I am going to 3 gallons chilled water to cool
the wort down instead of siphoning it through my counter flow chiller. I am going to let it ferment completly in the
primary glass carboy instead of racking it from the bucket to the carboy during fermentation. The KISS principle
applied to brewing as the guy at the shop called it.
 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: nkawtg on February 24, 2011, 08:18:22 AM
Is this how it's done? :D
http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=K-Rs6YEZAt8# (http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=K-Rs6YEZAt8#)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on February 24, 2011, 11:51:49 AM
Brewed a Stella "clone" lager on Tuesday and a Coopers Canadian Blonde yesterday.  Gotta keep the brewing in rotation, so I don't run out.  ;)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on February 24, 2011, 12:01:39 PM
Brewed a Stella "clone" lager on Tuesday and a Coopers Canadian Blonde yesterday.  Gotta keep the brewing in rotation, so I don't run out.  ;)

I have been thinking about getting another batch of mead going.  I have gone through about 2/3 of what I had bottled 6 months ago.

I have had fantistic results from the honey, elderberry, hint of orange mix.  Anyone have recommendations for a spring time mead?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Roamer on February 24, 2011, 08:11:59 PM
Brewed a partial mash IPA today after work. It is in the bathtub now being cooled by the Swamp
method and has the blow off tube attached. It has an OG of 1.078
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: KYdoomer on February 24, 2011, 08:49:52 PM
After a too long hiatus...

I'm making dirt cheap plum wine.  I've got the proper equipment but I'm making this one with less than 5 dollars in material and less than 5 dollars worth of equipment, just to prove it can be done. 

J
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Roamer on February 25, 2011, 06:57:55 AM
After a too long hiatus...

I'm making dirt cheap plum wine.  I've got the proper equipment but I'm making this one with less than 5 dollars in material and less than 5 dollars worth of equipment, just to prove it can be done. 

J

Can you give us the material and equipment list please?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: KYdoomer on February 25, 2011, 08:58:15 AM
Fruit juice (minus preservatives and in a bpa free bottle).
Sugar
Yeast
Airlock
Cork

Use the bottle as a primary and secondary. It's important that you buy a bottle with the appropriate size opening to match your cork. I did a whole video of the process.

J
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on February 26, 2011, 03:38:45 PM
very cool vid and site, KYdoomer.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: KYdoomer on February 26, 2011, 03:56:23 PM
very cool vid and site, KYdoomer.

Thank you.  I got a few questions from beginners anxious to get into this but without a big investment.  Hopefully I brought a few more into the fold.   :) 

J
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: AZCeltic formerly occeltic on February 27, 2011, 12:36:05 PM
Every time I read through this thread my mouth goes dry and my taste buds start calling out for some of the great brews, wine concoctions, and other liquid delights that you all have put together. I am in the process of putting all the pieces back together to brew once again, and have paid a visit to the local brew shop to look over their kits to choose one that will not be too challenging...since it has been quite a while. I too want to learn to brew from scratch, and am wondering if anyone has tried their hand at growing their own hops? There is a local micro-brewery here that has a small patch growing out in front of their building, and they have been using them as a way to save time and $$, not to mention making an excellent brew!

Occeltic
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: AZCeltic formerly occeltic on February 27, 2011, 12:38:03 PM
Sorry folks, I see that there is a thread regarding my question about hops! I should have looked around a bit more.

Occeltic
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on February 27, 2011, 01:52:21 PM
occeltic,

I'm glad to hear you are getting back on the brewing bandwagon. We are only our second batch of beer right now (so far, so good). Both times we have ordered kits from Midwest and been very happy with the results. We were talking about doing more from raw materials in the future, but would like to get a little more experience with the kits first.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on March 20, 2011, 09:52:26 PM
I've been absent from the forums recently but not from brewing (or prepping).  My recent concoctions have been a huge success.  A nice pale ale, a robust porter, an American wheat and just this weekend I stepped up to all grain and brewed an amber ale.  The reasoning for all grain was to take advantage of bulk grain buys and motivate me to get a grain crusher/miller which I'd like to have on hand for homemade bread from bulk wheat.  I love the overlap you get in gadgets once you start making things from scratch!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on March 21, 2011, 02:03:06 PM
I have literally buckets and buckets of hard white and hard red wheat... and, I already have a grain mill. Can I assume that I could use this grain (purchased for bread-making) and my mill (set on the coarsest grind) to make beer? [in the kits, we have purchased grains already crushed since we planned to use them right away]
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: chrisdm8 on March 21, 2011, 04:26:59 PM
Someone else feel free to jump in and correct me as I'm not an expert. But, by my understanding ... regular (unmalted) grains wouldn't do good to brew beer. The process of malting produces enzymes that convert the starches into sugars in the wort. So, brewing with unmalted grains would likely end up with less than pleasant results.

Something I'd like to know though ... is the malting process something easy enough to do at home?

On a side note, my second year of maple wine is now in the primary.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 21, 2011, 04:31:02 PM
I have never malted any grain, but if memory serves...

your "sprout" the grain (germinate) and then toast the sprouted grains...  the act of germinating causes the desired effects for brewing.

I don't think it would be too much trouble to sprout the grain... and the toast it in your oven... (if that is the proper procedure)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on March 21, 2011, 09:11:43 PM
Hey, I have a sprouter, too... but I was thinking the grain we steeped in the warm water at the 1st step was just regular crushed grain... not sprouted or anything exotic... (perhaps I am mistaken). I haven't thought about the malting process yet :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hillclimber on April 19, 2011, 12:33:42 PM
Just bottled a batch of Irish Stout (Mt Mellick, 2lbs dark malt sugar and some notrhern brewer hopps for aroma). After cleaning out my Better Bottle, I started the second stage of my wife's larger( Coopers, with 2lbs of amber malt, Hallertau and Pearle hopps).

Hello, my name is hillclimber, and I'm a "extract" brewer ::)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on April 22, 2011, 10:39:39 PM
Just got my first partial mash kits from Austin Homebrew Supply (1-Belgian Golden Ale, 1-Maibock and 1-Hefeweizen).  Got a feeling all grain will be my next step very shortly.  I've been listening to Basic Brewing Radio (http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.php?page=home (http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.php?page=home)), a short podcast which has episodes dating back to 2005.  Well laid out for both the beginner and those with a working knowledge of the brewcraft.  I just listened to an older episode on home malting and it didn't sound real easy.  Of course if we wanted easy, we'd buy beer at the 7-11  ;)  From what I gather, you sprout the grain to start the enzymes breaking down the starches and then dry the grain to stop the process.  The grain can then be cooked or kilned/roasted to gather certain flavors or colors.  I think that's the process.  Certainly not something I'm ready for yet. 

LvsChant, not sure what type of mill you have, but I recently listened to an interview with Charlie Papazian "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing" and he still mills his grains with a Corona mill!!  Nothing fancy for him and I'm sure his beers are awesome.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on April 24, 2011, 10:13:36 AM
Thanks, HD. I'll check out the link. I think the corona mill has been reviewed somewhere here on the forum. General consensus was that it was pretty good for things like cornmeal, but that it wouldn't grind finely enough to be very good for wheat flour. I'm guessing if I just set my grinder on a coarse grind, it ought to work OK. We bought Charlie Papazian's book, too... but haven't ventured past brewing with kits. So far, so good...

By the way, do you have a recipe for the Stella Artois?... it is one of my husband's faves.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on April 24, 2011, 11:37:47 AM
I think I got the below Stella recipe off of Brewboards.  Austin Homebrew Supply has a Stella kit which can be found by following: Shop - Beer Recipe Kits - Our Versions of Commercial Beers - St thru Sz.  The recipe below is brewed extract style, you just make the kit up yourself gathering the ingredients from your homebrew supplier.  Very tasty and I didn't even use distilled water, just my well water.  Not sure if you are set up to lager or not, but I'm sure that would effect the flavor (recipe and AHS kit are lagers).  I've done a Lone Star clone (full lager) with my next batch I brewed using the same Lone Star recipe, but with Wyeast Kolsch Ale 2565 " The yeast can be used to produce quick-conditioning pseudo-lager beers." and did notice a flavor change.  Great beer, just different from the lager version.  Hope this helps

Stella Artois Recipe

I've made this twice and I swear its the closest thing I've ever had to a Stella Artois, so I felt it neccesary to share. For all those stella fans.

YOU'LL NEED
3 gal of distilled water
1lbs Cara Pils
6lbs Mutons extra light
Wyeast 2007
3/4oz of Perle @ 7.8%
1oz Saaz @ 3.0%
1 Hallertau German @ 5%

Steep cara @ 150F for 45 min, then remove
Bring to a boil and add 3/4oz Perle and 1/4 Saaz
-after 45 min add 1oz of Hallertua
-after 40 additional minutes add 3/4 oz of Saaz for 5 minutes

The key is the distilled water. One of the secrets to a pils is the PH, its very low. SO use the 3 gal of distilled in the boil, then after the boil top up with tap or spring water to about 5 1/4.

Let the beer at 70F until the fermention takes off, then primary ferment at 50 for 7-10days and transfer to secondary
Then lager at 32-40F for six weeks
Let go to room temp for a couple of days
bottle or keg and lager for 4-6 more weeks below 50F


edited to move red glow effect which makes it hard for me to read. TexDaddy
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on April 24, 2011, 08:36:12 PM
+1 Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: javabrewer on May 06, 2011, 11:18:41 AM
I have literally buckets and buckets of hard white and hard red wheat... and, I already have a grain mill. Can I assume that I could use this grain (purchased for bread-making) and my mill (set on the coarsest grind) to make beer? [in the kits, we have purchased grains already crushed since we planned to use them right away]

You can use those grains as a portion of the total grain bill.  They don't yet contain the enzymes required to convert the starches to sugars and therefore wouldn't be good on their own.  Two caveats:

First you need to make sure you provide ample enzymes by limiting the amount of these un-malted grains to a smaller percentage of your total grain bill and by using malted grains with excess diastatic power (the ability to do this conversion).  A base grain such as 2-row has enough diastatic power to cover you should you not exceed ~30% of the total grain bill with un-malted grains.  6-row malt I believe has even higher diastatic power.

Second you will likely need to skip a single-infusion mash and opt for at least a 2 step mash by including a protein rest.  Otherwise you will get cloudy beer, low head retention, and/or a stuck sparge.  Check out John Palmer's free online book http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html (http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html) for a really good intro to all this.  Here is a link to the basics of the protein rest: http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-4.html (http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-4.html).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on May 07, 2011, 05:47:56 AM
Thanks very much for the info. and links!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Kellib on June 02, 2011, 03:31:28 PM
Wow thanks for the info and the links. Been making our own beer with kits and are now interested in putting together our own ingredients. This survival s@@$ is fun!!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on June 02, 2011, 03:40:28 PM
I have to say, I've never made beer but listening to Jack's podcast this week makes me want to try.
It sure doesn't sound much harder than wine.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Kellib on June 02, 2011, 03:49:55 PM
Got to do it making beer is the best!!! you get just what you want in a good bottle or glass of brew
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 02, 2011, 04:00:47 PM
I'm going to be stopping by the local brew shop this weekend.  I need a couple things for my next batch of mead.  I think I will make a batch of beer first (since the carboy will be in use for the next 6 months)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 04, 2011, 08:45:20 PM
Well, I was going to go for something simple and ended up with a nut brown ale.  I will start work on that tomorrow.  Pretty exciting, I have thought about brewing beer for quite some time.  I don't know why I have this notion that it's much more complicated then wine.  My goal is to make Jack's Conversion Pollinator Triple.  Baby steps... right?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on June 05, 2011, 07:26:57 PM
Well... we opened up another bottle of the beaujolais we brewed last fall... I must say age is improving the taste... it'll probably be great by the time we get to the last bottle.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 05, 2011, 08:40:07 PM
Well... we opened up another bottle of the beaujolais we brewed last fall... I must say age is improving the taste... it'll probably be great by the time we get to the last bottle.

Isn't that always how it works?  Did you use your own fruit or a kit for your Beaujolais?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on June 06, 2011, 08:30:21 AM
It was our first big batch wine experiment. I ordered concentrated juice and the ingredients according to a recipe I found at the Midwest site... It is a bit more cloudy than I'd like, but is tasting better and better.

BTW, I posted in the good deals board that Groupon has a special going on for brewing equipment from Midwest in time for Father's Day. I had never used Groupon before, so I had a 1st time user $20 coupon that I combined with the deal. I ended up getting a complete beginner beer-brewing setup and a beer ingredients kit for $44 plus $12 shipping. I think it normally would have cost $127 plus $12.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 12, 2011, 04:59:34 PM
Just brewed a batch of American Cream Ale.  It is a straight extract brew, but this style is pretty good for the summer.  I think that I'll put some vanilla into the bottling bucket at that time.  I'm thinking that vanilla in a cream ale will be really good.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 12, 2011, 07:10:13 PM
Just brewed a batch of American Cream Ale.  It is a straight extract brew, but this style is pretty good for the summer.  I think that I'll put some vanilla into the bottling bucket at that time.  I'm thinking that vanilla in a cream ale will be really good.
Sounds awfully tasty to me!!
Vanilla extract or some chopped vanilla bean?...

hmmm, wonder how the a couple of vanilla beans would do pitched into the secondary...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 12, 2011, 08:14:38 PM
I'm thinking that since everything else is extract, might as well use vanilla extract.

This is the first time I've done a straight extract brew.  I usually have some specialty grains in it.  But since I'm going on vacation soon, I needed this to cook up quickly.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: welshman on July 01, 2011, 12:44:10 PM
I got 9 gallons of mead going racked it last night trying different yeast for different flavors can't wait to taste them
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on July 02, 2011, 05:34:46 PM
My lovely wife and I started a 10 gal. batch of fruit/island wine today.
Bananas, pineapple, lime, and apple cider.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on July 03, 2011, 02:53:24 PM
Started Jack's Conversion Pollinator Tripel the other day.  Plugged the airlock within 48 hours of pitching the yeast.  Switched to a hose into a pail of water and it's bubbling like crazy.  It's gonna be a long wait to sample this goodness!!!!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: oley454 on July 04, 2011, 01:21:52 PM
Just finished a cream ale, and collecting supplies for a honey ale after that.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 04, 2011, 01:32:20 PM
I bottled my cream ale.  I was going to put some vanilla in it, but I had it in the bottling bucket before I thought about it.  I'll do it next time.

I'll crack into them some time next week.  They will likely last about a month or so.  So time to figure out what to brew next.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: photographerjane on July 06, 2011, 01:17:38 PM
My 3rd batch of stinging nettle beer is bubbling away in the background. My husband has his second batch of gluten free beer providing the harmony.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: tx_floods on July 06, 2011, 06:58:27 PM
Cherry Wheat in secondary. Delicious!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on July 06, 2011, 08:25:18 PM
My 3rd batch of stinging nettle beer is bubbling away in the background. My husband has his second batch of gluten free beer providing the harmony.

Welcome aboard photographerjane.  When you get a second, could you share the recipe you use for nettle beer?  I've read about and would love to try it.  Nettle is one thing in abundance around here....
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: chrisdm8 on July 08, 2011, 05:51:27 PM
photographerjane, How is the gluten free beer? I've been tempted to try because I have a number of friends who have wheat intolerance ... if it's good, and you don't mind sharing, I'd love a recipe.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: welshman on July 14, 2011, 11:51:24 AM
Just finished bottling my slow dry mead  (22 bottles) now I am waiting for my other mead to finish so I can make sparlking mead out of it. Has any one tried irish moss to speed up the clearing
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 14, 2011, 02:03:26 PM
I have not tried irish moss, though I can't imagine it would cause any problems.  You would need to bring your must to a boil, but that should not have too much of an adverse effect, irish moss must be boiled for ~ 15 minutes to work properly, IIRC.  You will want to make sure you continuously stir to keep the honey from scorching on the bottom of your pot.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: welshman on July 15, 2011, 06:10:31 AM
I have it in powder form and from what I read you just put it in when you add the must in the fermenting jug then stir . I'll try this and then on the next batch try it your way thanks for the info.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: JimQ on July 15, 2011, 07:32:02 AM
I brewed up an amber/brown ale several weeks ago and bottled it just over a week ago.  I think it needs another couple of days to age in the bottle before it's good.  I tried on a couple of days ago and it wasn't very carbonated and tasted a little on the sweet side.

That was my second home brew.  My first was from a Brewer's Best English Pale Ale kit that came out well.

I want to try a Kolsch style in the future.  I have malt for a stout style.

Jim
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 15, 2011, 08:13:53 AM
I will be making an Anchor Steam clone this weekend.
What do ya'll think?

6 LBS light LME
1 lbs crystal 40L
.25 lb maltodextrin updated by LC
2 oz northern brewer
1.5 - bittering
.5 - aroma
White labs California common lager yeast
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: brewboss on July 15, 2011, 08:40:41 PM
20 gallons of octoberfest tonight, shared with 3 other people.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 15, 2011, 09:27:17 PM
update on the recipe:
it is .25 lbs not .25 cp for maltodextrin

made correction in above recipe... LC
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: d0j0w0 on July 16, 2011, 08:54:48 PM
Just finished brewing a batch of spiced ginger peach mead.  Man I can't wait for this one, it smells so damn good.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on July 17, 2011, 11:32:46 AM
First racking of the island wine we put up on July 2.
It has potential.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: AcuPunk112 on July 18, 2011, 09:58:20 AM
My brothers and I brewed up an Avery IPA clone last night. Love love love me some hops!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 18, 2011, 10:02:43 AM
I opened a bag of Northern Brewer yesterday... holy crap... I couldn't keep myself from smelling it while I was stirring my wort.  Just so damn good!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: canprep on July 18, 2011, 10:34:29 AM
Got a mead brewing in the closet just waiting for it to clear really. Simple plastic jug with a balloon as my airlock can't reuse the jug but it was 2 bucks counting the spring water. Hopefuy I don't die when I drink it. I'l let you know how it turns out.

 
Method I'm trying (broke the link just in case it's an issue)
http://www.stormthecastle.com/mead/fast-cheap-mead-making.htm 

edit: archer: repaired link, not an issue
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Koed on July 19, 2011, 10:21:50 AM
So last week I did 10 gallons of Smoked Cherry Porter!   I am putting about 5 pounds of cherries in each carboy.  To get the smoked flavor I found this Smoked Cherrywood malt...So cherry wood, why not cherries too??
And yes I did offer Jack a bottle in a question.

Next week I plan on doing a pale ale and an Oktoberfest in the same day.  10 gallons of Pale ale and 8 gallons of Oktoberfest I am going to ferment the oktoberfest in 2 Corney Kegs in my kegerator!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: jpommer on July 19, 2011, 03:24:45 PM
I have a Fat Tire clone in the secondary right now, and a black wheat ale in bottles waiting for opening day. Next up is a clone of Old Specked Hen (yum!!).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on July 21, 2011, 01:00:11 PM
I started a 6 gallon batch of Merlot from a kit today. I bought the kit in March and am just getting to it. I bought the kit from Midwest and couldn't remember which yeast (stored in the frig) went with the kit, since I have a couple of different yeast varieties. I used their instant chat and got the answer very quickly. good stuff.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 01, 2011, 10:25:08 PM
Got a gallon of cherry melomel ~ .5 lbs cherries with 3 lbs of clover honey. The cherries had been in the fridge for about a week, were starting to show some spoilage, so I pitted them, washed them off and dunked them in the carboy.  3 lbs of honey, just short of one gallon of water and half a packet of champagne yeast (I probably would have used something other then champagne yeast, like lavlin 71 or one of the others that is in my fridge, but it was the packet that was open)  It is bubbling like made right now, the OG of the honey was 1.144, maybe a little more if you count the cherries.  Depending on how the cap does by next week, I may rack it, may let it sit for an extra couple of days.

The Anchor Steam clone will be ready to bottle upon my return  from Wisconsin, next week.  I cannot wait for this one.

Speaking of... is it normal that small pieces of the trub, dead yeast, are floating up to the surface and then falling back down like a lava lamp?  I assume this is normal with lager yeast used at the 65-70 degree temps.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on August 02, 2011, 05:26:07 AM
My husband started his third batch of beer this weekend... another kit from Midwest. This one is a Belgian Tripel. It is bubbling away and smelling very "beer"y. On the last two batches, he has not been thrilled with the amount of fizz obtained by using the 5 oz. packet of priming sugar that comes with the kits. Both batches, while having very good taste, were just a bit flat. Any input from experienced brewers? Both times we had slightly more than the 5 gallons, so we are guessing that is the cause, but it wasn't very much over, so we were wondering why it had such an impact. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: welshman on August 02, 2011, 06:30:09 AM
I put up 12 bottles of sparkling mead 2 weeks ago added 1/2 cup of honey into 3gallons of mead then capped it we'll see in about 6 months if the bubbles are there.  Nothing special about this mead except maybe it is dry and strong.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 02, 2011, 07:01:37 AM
My husband started his third batch of beer this weekend... another kit from Midwest. This one is a Belgian Tripel. It is bubbling away and smelling very "beer"y. On the last two batches, he has not been thrilled with the amount of fizz obtained by using the 5 oz. packet of priming sugar that comes with the kits. Both batches, while having very good taste, were just a bit flat. Any input from experienced brewers? Both times we had slightly more than the 5 gallons, so we are guessing that is the cause, but it wasn't very much over, so we were wondering why it had such an impact.
The amount over 5 gallons won't be the cause.  Mine are always over.

I think that either time in bottle or temperature where bottle conditioned, or both, are the biggest contributions to low fizz.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on August 02, 2011, 07:15:27 AM
Thanks, Fritz. We'll look at those issues and see if we have better results this time around. I sent my Dad a beer kit for Father's Day (actually he wanted me to delay having it shipped, so it is going to be sent this next week)... we'll be helping him brew a batch of Amber Ale when we go out for a visit with him. We're bound to get this figured out, eventually!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on August 02, 2011, 07:21:26 AM
JPommer,
what's your recipe for the Fat Tire clone? one of my all time faves.
Saint
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 16, 2011, 02:46:21 PM
Ordered my Chardonney kit, should be bubbling by next week...

Once I get that started, I have found a recipe for Stone's IPA that I am REALLY excited about trying.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on August 16, 2011, 04:18:41 PM
That Chardonnay sounds good. I have made mostly red wines so far (with the exception of an apfelwein). My hubby doesn't care much for the white wines and I like it all... :D A wine swap would be good...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 16, 2011, 04:23:34 PM
That Chardonnay sounds good.  :D A wine swap would be good...

I like the idea... though it may be some time... I think something could be worked out ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on August 19, 2011, 12:38:27 PM
Kegged my Hefeweizen and bottled Jack's recipe for Conversion Pollinator Tripel today.  Now the wait begins, should be ready to drink around Thanksgiving.  Mine turned out around 12.9% ABV, but I didn't take a reading prior to and after adding the honey to the primary, so it may well be above that number.  This weekend I think it's time to step up to my Pumpkin Ale all grain kit for Halloween.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 19, 2011, 01:24:15 PM
Kegged my Hefeweizen and bottled Jack's recipe for Conversion Pollinator Tripel today.  Now the wait begins, should be ready to drink around Thanksgiving.  Mine turned out around 12.9% ABV, but I didn't take a reading prior to and after adding the honey to the primary, so it may well be above that number.  This weekend I think it's time to step up to my Pumpkin Ale all grain kit for Halloween.

I am VERY interested in how that Conversion turns out.  I have a bottle of Chimay in my fridge that I will be taking the yeast from to make this recipe.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Sarcasmo on August 19, 2011, 01:49:56 PM
Fresh Blackberry Wine.  I just picked another three pounds of blackberries during my lunch break from a black berrypatch by a nearby marsh.  Mother Nature does not give up her fruit easily with blackberries.

Also I have a "flowering plum" tree in front yard that was gracious enough to produce over 6lbs of little plums.  Their delicious juice is currently fermenting in the carboys.

The recipes I use come from this handy little book, Making Wild Wines & Meads: 125 Unusual Recipes Using Herbs, Fruits, Flowers & More.

Monetary amount spent on alcohol purchased from a commercial producer: $0.00  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 19, 2011, 02:10:45 PM
Nice!!!

I tend to spend a good portion of my alotted $ on commercial wines... course there are not too many Malbec or Cabernet or Zinfindel or Chardonney... or.... growing wild
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on August 19, 2011, 02:31:49 PM
Fresh Blackberry Wine.  I just picked another three pounds of blackberries during my lunch break from a black berrypatch by a nearby marsh.  Mother Nature does not give up her fruit easily with blackberries.

Also I have a "flowering plum" tree in front yard that was gracious enough to produce over 6lbs of little plums.  Their delicious juice is currently fermenting in the carboys.

The recipes I use come from this handy little book, Making Wild Wines & Meads: 125 Unusual Recipes Using Herbs, Fruits, Flowers & More.

Monetary amount spent on alcohol purchased from a commercial producer: $0.00  ;D
good job! I have that book also. so far i've done a few recipes and they turned out good.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: danbrown0331 on August 20, 2011, 03:12:33 PM
(http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m549/danlbrown/utf-8BSU1HLTIwMTEwODE5LTAwMDE5LmpwZw.jpg)

(http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m549/danlbrown/utf-8BSU1HLTIwMTEwODE5LTAwMDE4LmpwZw.jpg)

partial mash kolsch
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 20, 2011, 08:20:07 PM
lookin good
gonna have to put one of those together one of these days
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 21, 2011, 03:41:45 PM
Got the Chardonnay kit started this morning, it's bubbling away atm.

Tried something new as well,
Cinnamon/clove/nutmeg/ginger metheglin
Only a gallon test batch, OG is a little lower then most of my meads... 1.080 instead of 1.130 or 1.120. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: danbrown0331 on September 02, 2011, 11:04:34 AM
Kolsch has been setting in the bottles for about a week now, I'm addicted to homebrewing and went out to my LHBS and bought a few more carboys, I have an Irish Red about ready to get bottled, an Arrogant Bastard clone and an American Amber that I brewed up a few nights ago, I had to pull the airlock on the American Amber last night and give it a blow off tube, pretty violant fermentation that I wasn't expecting as everything else I have done up to this point just foamed up an inch or two.
Hopefully I can get production above my consumption level here before to long so I can dedicate 6 weeks of carboy use for Jacks Conversion Pollinator Triple
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 02, 2011, 11:30:31 AM
My Anchor Steam clone is really starting to age and show some good flavor.  The hoppy bitterness is mellowing a bit and a hint of cinnamon is starting to come to the front.  It is only my second beer, but I am really pleased with how it has turned out. 

Next week I will be brewing the Stone IPA clone.... I almost want to take all my gear with me this weekend, heading out to AZ to visit my bro.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 13, 2011, 02:21:45 PM
The IPA came off without issue.  The primary is bubbling away, my spare shower smells HEAVILY of hops.  2 oz Magnum for bittering (1 oz @ 75 minutes, 1 oz @ 45 mins) and 2 oz Centennial (1 oz @ 15 minutes, 1 oz at flameout).  yummy yummy smell :D
I have two more oz of Centennial that I will dry hop with, when I rack to secondary.

OG was 1.070
ABV should be around 7.5%

The Chardonnay got racked off of the oak wood chips (8 days)  I will leave it in tertiary for 1-2 months before I bottle and age for about 6 months.  Should be good to go for next summer :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: brewboss on September 24, 2011, 05:29:05 PM
Today i made my annual batch of pumpkin ale. I normally make a 5 gallon batch.  This year i made 14!  Theres a huge demand for it this year. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Roamer on September 28, 2011, 06:05:03 PM
 I just bottled a Midwest kit Oatmeal Stout. First time using my Son of Fermentation chiller. FG was 1.015 from a OG
of 1.044. It would not get down to the FG Midwest recommended of 1.010-1.012 despite 11 days in primary
and 14 days in secondary. I even threw in some dry yeast a couple days after racking to secondary.

Taste good though.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: danbrown0331 on October 04, 2011, 08:24:33 PM
I have a double IPA, a cinnamon roll ale, pumpkin ale, cinnamon cider and kolsch fermenting. Just bottled some green chili ale and a roasted honey ale. American Ale, Arrogant batard clone, dark ale and Irish red all turned out great.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mikem on January 03, 2012, 09:33:33 AM
Brewed in december - currently conditioning:
- Maharaja Imperial IPA clone
- Chimay Red Dubbel Clone
- Affigem Abbey Trippel Clone

And, finished a self-created recipe over the weekend: Pale Mike's Pale Ale!
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/390874_10151110259250051_507190050_22292878_619720575_n.jpg)
I think this is going to be quite tasty.



Recipe for the beer nerds:

Overview:
Pale Mike's Pale Ale
Grains: 11.5lb 2 row organic | 4oz 120' L crystal
Target vol: 5g

Mash:
Initial mash water volume: 5-6g (filtered)
Target mash temp: 153'
Actual mash temp: 155' (water added @ 165')
End mash temp: 148' (lost some temp here - not sure why)

Sparge:
sparge temp: 170' (total batch wort volume pre-boil: 5.5g)

Boil:
90 min boil
add 1oz northern brewer for 90 min of boil (bittering hop)
add 4oz maltodextrin for 90 min of boil (for mouth feel and body)
add 1oz cascade for final 15 of boil (flavor hop)
add 1oz cascade for 3 min of boil (aroma hop)
pitched Wyeast 1272 american II

OG = 1.060

TOTAL VOLUME IN FERMENTER: 4.5g (more boiled off than i had anticipated, but led to a higheer OG)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: lnl4 on January 04, 2012, 07:27:06 AM
Just put my IPA i made into the secondary and am dry hopping with 20gr cascade.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 16onRockandRoll on January 04, 2012, 08:43:29 PM
My first batch is going into the secondary tomorrow, a good looking basic partial mash wheat beer. Once the primary is empty/cleaned, I will be starting a dark english mild ale. Getting hooked and I haven't even bottled a bottle of beer yet!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 05, 2012, 08:15:41 AM
That is awesome!  The anticipation of a new brew will keep you coming back.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 12, 2012, 11:53:25 AM
Stayed up last night bottling my first batch.  It's basically a clone of "Mirror Pond". 

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-86mwa_dHIo8/Tw8rx8SqspI/AAAAAAAAGsc/l_gBDVE5wMk/s576/409032_3044082949031_1471856925_33117334_1946238096_n.jpg)

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-gdjhzXeAc10/Tw8ryI8hy8I/AAAAAAAAGsg/3QLRHQMvhhA/s320/399374_3044276473869_1471856925_33117368_1200896143_n.jpg)

Pardon the iPhone photos, I'm excited to share.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 12, 2012, 01:26:01 PM
Just a thought, I see that you have all of your caps layed out on a towel.  I put all of mine into a bowl with some StarSan and let them soak while I rack into my bottling bucket.  This way I know for sure that there will not be any contamination from the caps.

Oh, and iPhone pics are great!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 12, 2012, 02:16:39 PM
Just a thought, I see that you have all of your caps layed out on a towel.  I put all of mine into a bowl with some StarSan and let them soak while I rack into my bottling bucket.  This way I know for sure that there will not be any contamination from the caps.

Oh, and iPhone pics are great!

I did soak them in a starsan substitute (forget the trade name).  I was worried that if the caps were dripping wet when I capped it might impart a bad taste or affect the yeast, etc. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 12, 2012, 02:49:05 PM
Actually, StarSan (I am not sure about the other version you had) acts as a yeast nutrient... it will help fermentation, it will not impart any flavor (at least I have not noticed any pff flavors)

StarSan is also an mild acid, lower the pH will help the yeast as well.  Though the amount you will have on the cap will be close to 0 compared to the volume of beer you have in the bottle.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 12, 2012, 04:24:40 PM
Hmm - I'm not sure if it was a substitute, but at the brew shop I asked for "StarSan", and they recommended this instead:

Glosan non-costic 8oz
Price: $5.99
Non Caustic Alkaline Brewery Wash

It smells bitter like acid, even when diluting 1oz in 6 gallons.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 12, 2012, 05:00:00 PM
hmmm, yeah... in that case... maybe send an email to the company.  Or... if your method works and your beer is ok (there can be many reasons if it isn't) rock with it.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: lnl4 on January 12, 2012, 08:40:15 PM
Today i made my annual batch of pumpkin ale. I normally make a 5 gallon batch.  This year i made 14!  Theres a huge demand for it this year.

So care to give the recipe? I would love to try a batch!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mikem on January 15, 2012, 12:07:12 PM
Doing a left had milk stout clone today! Was HBT's recipe of the year so should be a goodun'
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 15, 2012, 12:30:59 PM
I brewed my first all grain yesterday.  Oatmeal stout.
I intended to use:
9 lbs 2 row
1 lb rolled oats
.5 lbs cara/pils
.5 lbs roast barley
.5 lbs black patent
.5 lbs crystal 40
.25 lbs chocolate malt
1 lbs rice hulls
1 oz fuggles
1 oz EK goldings
WLP005 British ale yeast

Well, I don't have a scale yet (I do have my reloading scale... but it measures in grains...) so I kinda winged it...
I did a single infusion mash with the non roasted grains for 45 mins @ 152 (I meant to get 156... I'll tell you why in a second) and then added the roasted grains to the mash for the last 15 mins to steep.

I took my first gravity reading... @ 152 deg... reading was 1.073.... UH OH...
Did some quick calculations... I actually used ~ 13.5 lbs of 2 row and ~ .25 lbs more of each of the other grains due to my "wingin' it" measuring method.

Another quick calculation and I have about 18-20 IBUs for what might turn out to be an 8% Imperial Oatmeal stout, needless to say, painfully unbalanced.... Thankfully I keep extra hops in my freezer.  I did not have any more English hops, but I did have 1.5 oz of Haulertau Mittlefruh... so I split that up and added half with my fuggles @ 75 mins and half with the EK Goldings @ 30 mins.

All in all, it turned out quite well.  From what I have read, 1 qt of water to 1 lb of grain is a little on the thick side for a mash, especially if there are sticky components.

I had created a 1l starter earlier in the week, as it turns out... that was a GREAT idea, as this beer would have had some difficulty fermenting with just one vial.

So here is what I think I ended up with:
13.5 lbs 2 row
1 lb rolled oats (this one was measured at the store when I bought it)
.6 lbs cara/pils
.58 lbs roasted barley
.58 lbs black patent
.58 lbs crystal 40
.3 lbs chocolate malt
1 oz fuggles @ 75 mins
.75 oz Mittlefruh @ 75 mins
1 oz EK Goldings @ 30 mins
.75 oz Mittlefruh @ 30 mins
1 servomyces cap @ 10 mins
.5 tsp irish moss @ 10 mins
1l starter WLP005 British ale yeast
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 30, 2012, 08:54:34 AM
Bottled the stout on Saturaday... mmm mmm the extra bit I didn't get into a bottle tasted fantastic.  Being higher in alcohol, and not quite balanced with hops... it tastes a little "hot"  but the bisquit/raison/plum flavor is nice and rich.  I can't wait until this carbs and has bubbles.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 30, 2012, 09:21:03 AM
Friday night I started my second batch ever.  It's a partial mash ale with 3 kinds of hops (1.5oz williamette .5oz cascade .5oz santium).  I can't recall the grain mix, as I was following a brew supply recipe card.  The end result should be like the old RedHook ale (back when they were in Fremont, like 15 years ago).

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 30, 2012, 09:23:28 AM
Friday night I started my second batch ever.  It's a partial mash ale with 3 kinds of hops (1.5oz williamette .5oz cascade .5oz santium).  I can't recall the grain mix, as I was following a brew supply recipe card.  The end result should be like the old RedHook ale (back when they were in Fremont, like 15 years ago).


that should be awesome.  I used to love Red Hook
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 16onRockandRoll on February 01, 2012, 02:31:31 PM
My first ever batch (some sort of wheat kit from my LHBS) is bottled and conditioning right now, and I have a gallon of standard Martinellis apple juice hardening, along with a half gallon of orchard juice going with the same yeast in both as a little experiment. I will probably be getting another full batch of beer going soon, but haven't decided what that will be.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on February 21, 2012, 02:13:24 PM
Racked my IPA into secondary last night.  I put the Magnum hops in as a first wort hop (put the hops in my brew kettle and drew the first runnings onto it from the mash... and then the sparge went on top of that.)  Acccording to BeerSmith, I get an extra 10% utilization from the hops compared to a standard 60 minute addition.

I also used a dry yeast this time, US-05.  I took a gravity reading as I was racking... it was 1.005.  According to BeerSmith, it "should" be around 1.011 ish.  With an OG of 1.060... this beer will end up being around 7%... I was shooting for low 6's.  The smell off of the beer is very "neutral" from yeast aromas.  Almost no phenolic or ester smells.

Using Columbus hops... a noticeable lemon aroma is on the beer, compaired to the grapefruit of Cascade or pungent/herbal/floral  flavor of Centennial

I have to say... I think Centennial is going to be my favorite hop for IPAs... until I can experiment with some other varieties.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 21, 2012, 04:43:00 PM
Got a bitter/amber (not sure where it'll end up) conditioning in bottles, about 12 days now.

Also have a carboy with some obsidian stout clone finishing up.  Likely will bottle this coming weekend if the hydro show the yeast is finished.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: KellyAnn on February 22, 2012, 03:22:39 PM
Using Columbus hops... a noticeable lemon aroma is on the beer, compaired to the grapefruit of Cascade or pungent/herbal/floral  flavor of Centennial

We used some Columbus hops in the IPA we've got in secondary now (should be able to drink it the first weekend of March).
We thought it was more an orange/tangerine smell.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on February 22, 2012, 04:28:32 PM
We used some Columbus hops in the IPA we've got in secondary now (should be able to drink it the first weekend of March).
We thought it was more an orange/tangerine smell.

I am really excited about this one.  My last IPA was stellar and this one should be a little lower in alcohol so it shouldn't smack ya in the face quite so heavily.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 22, 2012, 04:34:32 PM
I am really excited about this one.  My last IPA was stellar and this one should be a little lower in alcohol so it shouldn't smack ya in the face quite so heavily.

IPA is my next batch.  I have 4 kinds of hops in the freezer.  I personally have an affinity for Centennial during my boil, but not decided what to dry hop with.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 20, 2012, 11:20:41 AM
Bottled the IPA last night. 

Pondering what to brew next...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 20, 2012, 11:52:54 AM
Bottled the IPA last night. 

Pondering what to brew next...

I am in the same boat... not sure what I want to make.... I'm thinking about a California Common.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on June 12, 2012, 07:53:32 PM
We just bottled another batch of beer this past week... Autumn Amber Ale, a kit from Midwest. Only 6 days later (yes, DH had to test it early :) ), the beer tastes very good and has a nice amount of fizz.

We just received the next kit for Red Lager, so it will be brewed very soon. We also received another kit for a batch of Cabernet Sauvignon, so we'll be getting that one going, too...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on June 13, 2012, 05:59:45 AM
Quote
Actually, StarSan (I am not sure about the other version you had) acts as a yeast nutrient... it will help fermentation, it will not impart any flavor (at least I have not noticed any pff flavors) StarSan is also an mild acid, lower the pH will help the yeast as well.  Though the amount you will have on the cap will be close to 0 compared to the volume of beer you have in the bottle.
Grey - thanks - that's a little bit of info that is VERY valuable - had no idea and often spent a whole lot of time working to dry without contaminating the caps. Thanks!
Saint
p.s. about to get a stout going (not this weekend, but the next), thinking about trying something a little "different" (could be fruit, coffee, what have you), so if anyone has something recent give a shout.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 13, 2012, 08:54:00 AM
The CA Common came through ok... the fermentation was a bit warm... a little too phenol-y

I brewed a RyePA a week and a half ago, it's currently in secondary with two oz of Cascade hops

I also brewed a Belgian Tripel this past Saturday.  Very long brew day... the sparge wanted to stick... took over two hours to complete it.  In the last 24 hours I have had to remove the airlock and clean it out three times (very, very, very vigorous fermentation)  I used White Labs WLP530.  WLP530 is the yeast that the Trappist monastary Westmalle in Belgium uses.

In the next four weeks, I will be brewing for two seperate club barrel projects.  The local club has a contact with one of the local breweries that has several 50 gal oak barrels.  We have ~ 15+ brewers participating for each... each of us will brew 5 gallons, add it to the barrel at the brewery, they will keep the barrel on hand while the beer ages.  After ~ 6-8 months, we all will get 5 gallons of aged beer back!

The first will be a sour... Flanders Red
The second will be a Belgian Strong/Tripel

This has/will be a busy brewing summer.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 13, 2012, 09:41:43 AM
Currently have a (soon to be coconut) porter in primary.  This may be my last partial extract batch.  I only used 3 lbs. of LME, and made up the rest from grains.  Target o.g. was 1.057, but I only got 1.050 - I figure it'll work.

I'd like to try some Belgians

Greywolf - any suggestions for first belgian recipe?  All grain or partial mash is fine.  I do most of the math in my head now :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 13, 2012, 10:43:34 AM
I would think something in the range of a Belgian pale or Saison would be good.  Nice ester-y character to help with anything that may be off from mash or procedure.  Or better yet a Belgian Wit.... hmmm I might have to make a BWit myself.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 13, 2012, 04:36:18 PM
I may take a stab at converting an old cooler to a mash tun.  Plan to use the water supply mesh rather than the copper pipe to save a few bucks.  So far I've just mashed in my main kettle, and haven't noticed any scorching.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 13, 2012, 08:25:17 PM
I think you will get more volume with the cooler, on the flip side, you cannot really add much heat (other then water infusions).  You will need to make sure you have the equation for water temperature infusions.  Or the brewing software :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 26, 2012, 05:39:20 PM
Back on topic:

primary - california style IPA (first ale grain)
secondary - coconut porter
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 26, 2012, 11:20:09 PM
The RyePA is an interesting one, since i used .25 lbs black patent, it has a bit of a toffee/caramel note after the spiciness of the rye and hops start to fade.... will have to work on the recipe.

In the secondary fermenter I have: Belgian Tripel, I call Tartarus Warhammer

In the primary fermenter I have: Dunkelweizen, I can Mad Weasel

After 3 month in primary, I racked my 5 gallons of mead to secondary, where it got 2 cinnamon sticks and 3 vanilla beans.  I will keep it in secondary ~ 3 more months, see how it tastes, and if it's good, it will go to bottle.  Then maybe another 6 months to a year before it's ready to go.

I also have two one gallon batches of some test meads.  Both with a base of 2.5 lbs of honey, one with pound of cherries, the other with 1/3 lbs kumquats, a sprig of mint and a small handful of fresh thyme.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on June 29, 2012, 06:13:23 PM
I was going for hard apple cider, but after 5 days in primary fermentatation, what I got was curiously similar to witch hazel.  So I thought, I know what will fix this...carbonation!  :o

I think where it all went wrong was that I didn't wait for the juice to come up to room temp before pitching.  It was fairly cold considering I added that can of recently thawed frozed concentrate.

I'll try it again, and if I can get the base procedure working for me, then I'd like to try a juiced from fresh blend of apples and pears with a chamomile adjunct.

I also started some cherry infusions with brandy and vodka...maybe that shouldn't count as brewing though!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on June 29, 2012, 06:57:20 PM
I don't know about brewing, but I would consider it home brew. :)
Be interesting to see how it turns out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 29, 2012, 09:37:40 PM
I started out with cider, apple and pear. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 01, 2012, 01:35:13 PM
I have an American Amber Ale that I'm bottling today. I have some Mead that is bottle fermenting. I also have some blackberry wine that is ready to enjoy!  :)

My favorite beers from the past have been Wit, Porter, and Stout.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 06, 2012, 06:16:18 PM
I have an American Amber Ale that I'm bottling today. I have some Mead that is bottle fermenting. I also have some blackberry wine that is ready to enjoy!  :)

My favorite beers from the past have been Wit, Porter, and Stout.
blackberry wine sounds good. can you post a recipe?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: howardsheppard on July 07, 2012, 04:19:57 AM
I used to be an avid home brewer of beer and wine.  When kids came along I refused to lower my quality expectations so I just purchased GOOD stuff less often.

Now I just brew espresso!   8)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 09, 2012, 08:04:45 AM
blackberry wine sounds good. can you post a recipe?

I got the recipe and instructions from Jim and George's Home Wine Making, a great little book that has been in print since the 1970s, which I got it at Powell's about a year ago.

Blackberry Wine Recipe, 1 Gallon


Blackberry Wine Recipe, 5 Gallons

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 09, 2012, 09:57:45 AM
thanks for the recipe.

I started 2 test 1 gallon batches of cyder over the weekend. they are both bubbling quite nicely now.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 09, 2012, 04:11:14 PM
re: blackberry wine

Would it work to sub out some of the cane sugar for priming (corn) sugar and skip the yeast nutrient?

Or is there a wine equivalent to creating a "yeast starter" as is popular with home beer brewing?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 09, 2012, 06:37:59 PM
re: blackberry wine

Would it work to sub out some of the cane sugar for priming (corn) sugar and skip the yeast nutrient?

Or is there a wine equivalent to creating a "yeast starter" as is popular with home beer brewing?

I'm a bit of a novice when it comes to wine, but I'm going to say the answer to your first two questions is yes. According to my beer brewing book (How to Brew by John Palmer) 2.5 lbs of cane sugar is the equivalent of 2.72 lbs of priming sugar.

As for the optional yeast starter, the wine book I mentioned earlier gives these instructions: make a 1:1 ratio of must to water (either 1 c or 1/2 c) and add in the yeast packet, stir to break up lumps, let sit for a few hours, and then stir into must and let it ferment... of course you do all of this in and with sanitized equipment.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 12, 2012, 08:35:40 AM
In order to have a complete, and timely fermentation, the yeast nutrient is fairly vital.  Sugar does not provide the nutrients required... B vitamins, zinc, phosphates, etc.

You could survive on sugar alone, but you do need some additional nutrients in order for proper health.  Same with yeast.

As for the sugar, yeast really don't care if it's corn sugar, cane sugar, molasses, or honey.  If you are looking for a specific gravity increase, getting the correct conversion will be necessary, but I usually wing it and let the yeast do their thing.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 12, 2012, 12:35:16 PM
In order to have a complete, and timely fermentation, the yeast nutrient is fairly vital.  Sugar does not provide the nutrients required... B vitamins, zinc, phosphates, etc.

You could survive on sugar alone, but you do need some additional nutrients in order for proper health.  Same with yeast.

As for the sugar, yeast really don't care if it's corn sugar, cane sugar, molasses, or honey.  If you are looking for a specific gravity increase, getting the correct conversion will be necessary, but I usually wing it and let the yeast do their thing.

First, I'm a noob to brewing, so I'm probably going to ask some dumb questions...

I've noticed a lot of "quick" cider recipes call for yeast nutrient, whereas not a lot of the beer recipes I've read do.  I've seen the recipes for DIY nutrients using mashed/heated raisin juice, but have not actually used nutrient in any of my brews yet.   Is apple juice inherently less nutritive than a typical beer malt would be?  Is it more or less so if made from storebought juice vs fresh squeezed?  If you're starting from fresh juiced, does the presence or lack of peelings make a difference?  Pasteurization?
I know that the skins of fruits are usually rich with native yeast and that they can be fermented without any additional yeast, but that it can be hit or miss.  I also know that the point of sterilization is to eliminate competition for the the desired yeast strain.  So can it be logically deduced that pressing or juicing and then going straight into an unpasteurized primary fermentation would yield inconsistant results?   

The first 1 gal batch I did with storebought filtered juice.  After a week, airlock activity had stopped.  I sampled it and it had an astringent flavor with almost no hint of apple or sweetness.  Not sure if it was ruined or just too early, I primed/bottled it.  It's got three weeks on it now...was going to wait another week to open one up, but I'm not expecting anything drinkable.

The next batch I did has been in primary for 2 weeks.  I made that one from 8 lbs apple, 4 lbs pear, peeled/cored through the juicer.  After skimming the foam, I had to add 6 cups of filtered water to make 1 gallon, so I also added 1 cup of corn sugar.  Not sure of starting sg as my hyrdrometer decided to crack right as I needed to use it.  (This is a two is one, one is none teaching moment!) 
Next time I'll figure on 20 lbs fruit per gallon.  I brought this mixture to a boil, and added mulling spices and a sack of chamomile. The juice this made was very, very tasty and could easily stand on it's own for all the effort. 
Similar to the first batch, it appeared to be done fermenting after a week.  The aroma coming out of the airlock is very pleasant as opposed to the first batch, so I have high hopes.  I may prime just half of this as it is a test batch.  How long should this cure?  Couple months?  I bought the fruit at the supermarket at $2 lb, so it's an expensive bottle of juice that I don't want to rush.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 12, 2012, 12:56:21 PM
some quick answers. i'll work on the first part shortly.

The first 1 gal batch I did with storebought filtered juice.  After a week, airlock activity had stopped.  I sampled it and it had an astringent flavor with almost no hint of apple or sweetness.  Not sure if it was ruined or just too early, I primed/bottled it.  It's got three weeks on it now...was going to wait another week to open one up, but I'm not expecting anything drinkable.
what type of yeast did you use? aging it in the bottle will mellow the flavors, but it might take years if it is this dry.


Next time I'll figure on 20 lbs fruit per gallon.  I brought this mixture to a boil, and added mulling spices and a sack of chamomile. The juice this made was very, very tasty and could easily stand on it's own for all the effort. 
Similar to the first batch, it appeared to be done fermenting after a week.  The aroma coming out of the airlock is very pleasant as opposed to the first batch, so I have high hopes.  I may prime just half of this as it is a test batch.  How long should this cure?  Couple months?  I bought the fruit at the supermarket at $2 lb, so it's an expensive bottle of juice that I don't want to rush.
i let my ciders sit in the primary fermentation for a month (or longer if i forget about it), then i rack it to a 2nd carboy, and let it sit for a month. Then I bottle it and let it sit for at least 6 months..
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 12, 2012, 01:59:27 PM
I'll second Archer's process.  Your... hooch... needs time for the flavors to blend and mellow, because you do not have the balancing factors that come with hops, the "spicy" alcohol needs time to mellow to give you a "pleasing, balanced" taste.

Malted barley does have most, if not all, of the trace nutrients that yeast require for a healthy fermentation.  Adding extra nutrients will not cause harm.  It is a fairly cheap way to ensure that the yeast will be happy and complete their job.  Having said that, most juices do not have these nutrients; magnesium, phosphates, and most importantly, zinc.  Note, these are all "trace" amounts, but are required for healthy yeast growth, cell wall production and "budding", zinc being the most important of these nutrients for cell wall production and health.  The others are required at the bio chem level to catalyze and support the enzymatic action inside the yeast cells.

Many mead makers will stagger the nutrients additions during the first week of fermentation to absolutely make sure that the yeast kick @$$ and take names.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 12, 2012, 03:58:42 PM
I'll second Archer's process.  Your... hooch... needs time for the flavors to blend and mellow, because you do not have the balancing factors that come with hops, the "spicy" alcohol needs time to mellow to give you a "pleasing, balanced" taste.

Malted barley does have most, if not all, of the trace nutrients that yeast require for a healthy fermentation.  Adding extra nutrients will not cause harm.  It is a fairly cheap way to ensure that the yeast will be happy and complete their job.  Having said that, most juices do not have these nutrients; magnesium, phosphates, and most importantly, zinc.  Note, these are all "trace" amounts, but are required for healthy yeast growth, cell wall production and "budding", zinc being the most important of these nutrients for cell wall production and health.  The others are required at the bio chem level to catalyze and support the enzymatic action inside the yeast cells.

Many mead makers will stagger the nutrients additions during the first week of fermentation to absolutely make sure that the yeast kick @$$ and take names.

Awesome explanation. 
 
Some of the skills I developed as a hobbyist level reef keeper are coming in handy here.    Having obsessed over the wellbeing of fish, corals, copepods and phytoplankton, I can say there are some striking similarities between the two hobbies.  Obviously the chemistry piece.  Also, observational acuity. Not just visual, but smells, tactile feedback, temperatures etc...  Similar concepts apply in terms of trace element levels and chemical balance in water quality.  Reefing is a much more expensive habit though.   PATIENCE.  That's always the big one.

For a reefkeeper, a typical progression is to start with goldfish or guppies.  Then if that goes well, maybe some cichlids.  Then maybe a marine FOWLR system...and then finally the high risk/high reward world of reefkeeping.  Of course, there are also a lot of people that jump right into the deep end, like me. 

Some of the best advice I ever got sounded so ludicrous at first, but they were absolutely right.  You know what they told me?  First you learn how to keep water and rocks....WATER AND ROCKS?  Then you learn how to keep fish, and then corals/invertebrates.  If you can learn how to measure and keep water chemistry in balance for a year, then you can add your 1 fish and be relatively assured that you wont immediately kill it.  But not into your display tank...oh no no.  You need a quarantine tank.  Every new fish goes in there  for at least 6 weeks for observation.  What are we looking for?  Oh simple, read these 27 books.   And so on and so on... How many people actually take that advice?  Very few.  Is it still good advice?  Yes absolutely.  And what is the outcome?  Tropical fish stores get a lot of repeat business. 

Patience is the key to success in that hobby. The old salt reefer's mantra is "nothing good happens fast".   

Brewing is easier on wallet, and easier on the conscience.  If you rush something or screw it up, either way you're probably going to end up flushing something down the toilet.  Difference is, with brewing there are way too many yeast to name and bond with.    ;D 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 12, 2012, 04:04:25 PM
some quick answers. I'll work on the first part shortly.
what type of yeast did you use? aging it in the bottle will mellow the flavors, but it might take years if it is this dry.

i let my ciders sit in the primary fermentation for a month (or longer if i forget about it), then i rack it to a 2nd carboy, and let it sit for a month. Then I bottle it and let it sit for at least 6 months..

Thank you Archer.  Maybe a bit longer than I anticipated, huh?  Not sure on the yeast strain off the top of my head.  It's the first yeast I bought from a brew supply shop, and they recommended it for cider.  I know it's written on the bag...I shall check when I get home.

What is the purpose of the second carboy?  Does the dead yeast scum change the flavor over time?  Why not go straight to bottling?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 12, 2012, 07:23:29 PM
Thank you Archer.  Maybe a bit longer than I anticipated, huh?  Not sure on the yeast strain off the top of my head.  It's the first yeast I bought from a brew supply shop, and they recommended it for cider.  I know it's written on the bag...I shall check when I get home.

What is the purpose of the second carboy?  Does the dead yeast scum change the flavor over time?  Why not go straight to bottling?

A dry wine/champagne yeast uses up most of the residual sugars and produces a less sweet cider. I prefer my ciders sweet, so i use a sweet mead/cider yeast like Whitelabs WLP720 Sweet Mead/Wine Yeast. That is the one I used last weekend. I've also used White Labs #WLP775 English cider yeast a few times. I've used dry wines at times, but they turned out dryer than I like.

The racking helps it clear w/o using a clearing agent. It also stirs up the yeast and get a little more fermentation going. My first homebrew batch I swirled it around a lot in the primary, it produced some off flavors but the alcohol content was high!
Racking it also helps any semi-active yeast do their work, if you bottle it while you still have yeast working away, you might get exploding bottles.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 12, 2012, 08:48:54 PM
If you bottle it while you still have yeast working away, you might get exploding bottles.

Sorry Tiff!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 12, 2012, 08:51:46 PM
some quick answers. i'll work on the first part shortly.
what type of yeast did you use? aging it in the bottle will mellow the flavors, but it might take years if it is this dry.

i let my ciders sit in the primary fermentation for a month (or longer if i forget about it), then i rack it to a 2nd carboy, and let it sit for a month. Then I bottle it and let it sit for at least 6 months..

Ok, looks like it says the 71b on the yeast packet.  Does that sound right?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 12, 2012, 09:14:34 PM
Ok, looks like it says the 71b on the yeast packet.  Does that sound right?
who is the manufacturer?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 12, 2012, 09:39:04 PM
http://www.annapolishomebrew.com/Prodsheets/71B1122.pdf (http://www.annapolishomebrew.com/Prodsheets/71B1122.pdf)
This would be my guess:
71B is known for making blush and semi-sweet wines and owes its success to
its abilities to produce amyl ester (isoamyl acetate), reinforcing the aromatic profile of
wines. 71B also softens high acid musts by partially metabolizing malic acid (20-30%).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 12, 2012, 09:54:28 PM
who is the manufacturer?

No idea on that.  Will have to call the shop tomorrow.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 13, 2012, 09:01:28 AM
My amber is bottle conditioning, I think I may brew again this weekend. I could go for an ESB or a nut brown. I'll have to flip a coin.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 13, 2012, 10:01:42 AM
I've been thinking about putting an ESB into the rotation... maybe that will take the place of the double IPA I was going to do in August.

Bottled my Dunkelweizen last night... I think it's really going to rock.
The Belgian Tripel should be about ready to bottle in another week or two (secondary fermentation will have been 6 weeks  :o)

My brew club is doing a mass brew tomorrow.  We are brewing all of the Stone Vertical Epic beers.
http://calwesthydroponics.com/ (http://calwesthydroponics.com/)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 15, 2012, 11:11:53 PM
On Friday I picked up a brew kit from my local home brew supplier, so I'm graduating from the Mr. Beer kit.

It's basic stuff, nothing fancy.  A plastic PF bucket, glass carboy, thermometer, hydrometer, capper/caps, racking cane, siphon hose, bottling cane, airlock, iodophor, PBW, sample tube, and muslin bag.

I thought my lobster pot would be big enough to kettle in, but it's not, so I got a 30 qt turkey fryer w/stove.

So my first real DME brew is intended to be a crowd pleaser.  It's an American Pale Ale...Coops DME, 1lb crystal (crisp 15L) malt, .9 oz cascade for bittering, 2 oz citra for aroma, with white labs Calfornia Ale yeast.   
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 16, 2012, 10:13:25 AM
So my first real DME brew is intended to be a crowd pleaser.  It's an American Pale Ale...Coops DME, 1lb crystal (crisp 15L) malt, .9 oz cascade for bittering, 2 oz citra for aroma, with white labs Calfornia Ale yeast.   

Sanitation, sanitation, sanitation... after the boil.  Sounds like you should have yourself a nice brew.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 16, 2012, 10:18:12 AM
Brewed the Stone 07.07.07 clone on Saturday.  Myself and a bunch of the guys from the brew club brewed all 02.02.02 through 11.11.11... except for 10.10.10... the grape juice won't be available until September/October.

A great time was had by all, and Mitch Steele, head brewer at Stone dropped by for a couple of hours to chat about his beers, and deliver a bottle of each year to the brewer of that year (from 06 through 11).  Very humble, cool guy.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 18, 2012, 09:21:40 AM
Bottled my first all grain batch last weekend.  I'd describe it as between an ESB and an IPA.

It had a big grain bill of 15lbs, and I used my DIY cooler mashtun which worked fairly well.

To do items:
* calculate my mash efficiency
* cool my wort faster (consider immersion chiller)
* use my yeast starter I washed from this last batch.
* do a SMaSH brew using 10lbs. maris otter, left over hops and above yeast salvage
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 18, 2012, 09:29:16 AM
Bottled my first all grain batch last weekend.  I'd describe it as between an ESB and an IPA.

It had a big grain bill of 15lbs, and I used my DIY cooler mashtun which worked fairly well.

To do items:
* calculate my mash efficiency
* cool my wort faster (consider immersion chiller)
* use my yeast starter I washed from this last batch.
* do a SMaSH brew using 10lbs. maris otter, left over hops and above yeast salvage

good stuff!!
This next week is always rough, waiting for the beer to carb.
SMASH brew is something that I have not done yet.  Not sure I have enough time left in the year for all that I want to brew... geessh... I think I'm addicted.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 22, 2012, 11:15:09 AM
Finally got around to brewing again this weekend! (I had meant to brew the previous three weekends).

I tried my amber this weekend, and I think it's not done conditioning yet.

I brewed a Northwest Pale Ale this weekend with some Zeus hops that a friend harvested for me. It was a Deschutes Red Chair clone.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 23, 2012, 09:35:47 AM
Finally got around to brewing again this weekend! (I had meant to brew the previous three weekends).

I tried my amber this weekend, and I think it's not done conditioning yet.

I brewed a Northwest Pale Ale this weekend with some Zeus hops that a friend harvested for me. It was a Deschutes Red Chair clone.

I really enjoy RedChair.  Is there a material difference between Zeus and Columbus hops?  I'm suspicious that they are almost identical, separated by marketing hype.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 23, 2012, 09:08:31 PM
I really enjoy RedChair.  Is there a material difference between Zeus and Columbus hops?  I'm suspicious that they are almost identical, separated by marketing hype.

I suspect you are right :) I got them free because my friend harvested them from her work. I actually just did a google search for a recipe that uses a lot of Zeus hops and that's what we came up with.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 24, 2012, 10:40:30 AM
On the topic of hops, I planted a couple rhizomes this spring.  Each is over a foot tall.  Last weekend I rigged up some paracord horizontally with 1/4" thick twine running down for the hops to vine up.  I considered a more elaborate rig, but 2 eye bolts was all the hardware I used.

Next summer will be when this all comes to fruition (literally I hope).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 24, 2012, 11:52:05 AM
On the topic of hops, I planted a couple rhizomes this spring.  Each is over a foot tall.  Last weekend I rigged up some paracord horizontally with 1/4" thick twine running down for the hops to vine up.  I considered a more elaborate rig, but 2 eye bolts was all the hardware I used.

Next summer will be when this all comes to fruition (literally I hope).

What variety are you growing?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 24, 2012, 12:07:20 PM
One centennial, one cascade.  Not exotic, but I end up using a large quantity of both.  Given I live in Puget Sound and those were cash crops a century ago, I expect a decent harvest.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 24, 2012, 01:16:59 PM
From what I have heard, your first year will not be much, if anything.  Though the second and successive years can be upwards of a couple of pounds per vine (ideal growing conditions)

I too have Centennial (x's 2) and one Northern Brewer rhizome.  Unfortunately, I had one of my N'brewer rhizomes die because of too much water.

The N'brewer and one of the Centennials is ~ 12" long and starting to send out it's little side shoots, the other Cent. is over 2 feet long and has half a dozen side shoots that now account for most of it's length.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Survival Engineer on July 24, 2012, 03:26:53 PM
Hi Folks

I finished a hard cider a few weeks ago and have been enjoying the results.  I had a gallon of frozen cider from last year.  I Let it thaw out, added some honey and champagne yeast.  Four weeks of open brewing then one week in bottles. 

This excursion into cider has inspired me to start wine making (a bit of a leap).  I started two grape vines at my relatives property and look forward to setting the world record for smallest batch of wine made (joking...but really). 

Ben
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 24, 2012, 03:38:11 PM
This excursion into cider has inspired me to start wine making (a bit of a leap).  I started two grape vines at my relatives property and look forward to setting the world record for smallest batch of wine made (joking...but really). 

Ben

Excellent!
I hope to get some type of harvest from my grape vines next year.  Merlot will be 4 years old and the Chardonney will be 3
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on July 25, 2012, 09:21:07 AM
Hi Folks

I finished a hard cider a few weeks ago and have been enjoying the results.  I had a gallon of frozen cider from last year.  I Let it thaw out, added some honey and champagne yeast.  Four weeks of open brewing then one week in bottles. 

This excursion into cider has inspired me to start wine making (a bit of a leap).  I started two grape vines at my relatives property and look forward to setting the world record for smallest batch of wine made (joking...but really). 

Ben

Nice! Welcome to the forum. I've not made a grape wine but I've made wine out of blackberries I harvested for free. It wasn't too difficult, from what you've done already I'm sure you'll do a fine job.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on July 28, 2012, 08:47:30 PM
At this moment, working on a mid gravity Belgian Saison extract. Shooting for 1.070 og.

Jury's still out on my first American Ale from a couple weeks ago.  It's in secondary in a carboy for one more week till bottling, but what I've thieved seems promising.  Down to 1.014 from 1.058 and no obvious signs of infection.
My best area for fermentation is my laundry room.  It's been averaging 76-77f ambient which has me a little concerned given it's an ale yeast.

So that's why I decided to try a Saison this time.  Should work better for me this time of year, or until I can get my hands on an old fridge and a controller.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 28, 2012, 10:08:47 PM
I just bottled my Belgian Trippel... Belgian bottles with corks and cages.... a little bit of a process, but it will allow me to increase the CO2 levels to almost double the levels of most ales... should really give that "champagne" style bubbles.  The sample from the left overs was quite promising.  I'll post some pictures tomorrow, after I brew my Belgo IPA.

I also racked my Stone Epic Vertical 07.07.07 clone to secondary... pretty tasty... a little dry (I had to add an extra pound and a half of brown sugar).  I used someone elses grain mill and ended up with an efficiency of 68%... instead of 85-90% that I usually get with my mill.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on July 29, 2012, 12:12:44 AM
doing a double batch currently, 5gal of Porter and 5gal Weisse
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Bluegrass2003 on July 29, 2012, 08:55:15 AM
Gettin ready to start a big batch of North Carolina Raw mountain honey mead. I've added citrus and clove to my batches before but this will be straight honey, water, sugar and EC-1118. Any suggestions on the best way to kill the yeast? EC-1118 is very resilient, i suppose the best thing to do is to just let it brew for a long time to get that alcohol percentage up. I dont want the bubbles like you get with champagne but i like the dryness.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 29, 2012, 09:01:13 AM
To ferment to dryness, you will need to let it do it's thing.  Just recently I heard about using staggered nutrient additions.  You add a little yeast nutrient every other day for the first week or so, to really supercharge the little suckers.  They say that you will be able to have complete, ready to go mead in 3 months.  I haven't tried this yet, but will on my next batch.  If you are not adding the yeast nutrient, I would give it at least 2-3 months to make sure that the fermentation is complete.  If you bottle when not complete... they will finish... and you end up with grenades.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on July 29, 2012, 04:34:25 PM
To ferment to dryness, you will need to let it do it's thing.  Just recently I heard about using staggered nutrient additions.  You add a little yeast nutrient every other day for the first week or so, to really supercharge the little suckers.  They say that you will be able to have complete, ready to go mead in 3 months.  I haven't tried this yet, but will on my next batch. 

I just did this with my first mead batch. I am on the 2month and just bottled (it was really done on 1.5 months in, but i waited just to be sure). It tastes a little off... but i am going to taste a bottle every week to see how the flavor will change.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on July 29, 2012, 08:33:26 PM
I just did this with my first mead batch. I am on the 2month and just bottled (it was really done on 1.5 months in, but i waited just to be sure). It tastes a little off... but i am going to taste a bottle every week to see how the flavor will change.

give it 2 weeks or a month between tastings.. mead ages slowly
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 16onRockandRoll on August 15, 2012, 03:24:25 PM
I have been sticking to my stand by wheat, but this time around, I used a Belgian yeast.  I have found I don't need to use the fining pack that my LHBS includes in the wheat kit if I rack from my primary into my secondary, then back to the primary for an extra week, and it comes out awesome.  With this new yeast, when I went to my third ferment, it never bubbled the airlock.  according to my SG, its probably not done, so I'm nervous about bottle bombs, but I'll probably bottle tonight.  it's been in there for over a month, so I need to get it done.  I bottled a sample in a plastic bottle to make sure it carb'ed, and it's working well.  It smells great, so I can't wait to try it.

I just tried a bottle of peach lambic.  Thats amazing!  I may need to find a recipe for that.  My wife loved it too, so that helps.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 15, 2012, 03:31:31 PM
I have found that most Belgian yeasts will take a while to finish.  (the Trippel I brewed took 6 weeks to finish, and I let the temp in it go where it wanted... up to 78 degrees)  The Belgian IPA I brewed three or four weeks ago is now almost done, still little bubbles coming up the edges.  I think I may push it and bottle (though my difference in FG is 2 or 3 points, not 10 or 12 as you noticed)

question:
are you using a hydrometer or a refractometer?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 16onRockandRoll on August 15, 2012, 07:44:51 PM
Hydrometer.

and for clarification, "in there" meant the third ferment, its been fermenting for at least 8 weeks, but has been dormant for about the last four.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 16, 2012, 09:46:35 AM
I don't think you will have a problem with bottle bombs.  If you have roused the yeast, increased temp, and or used some nutrient in the 2ndary or tertiary... I would not worry.  You just might have a sweeter ale.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 16, 2012, 10:07:34 AM
Hydrometer.

and for clarification, "in there" meant the third ferment, its been fermenting for at least 8 weeks, but has been dormant for about the last four.

in secondary for 2 months?  Not sure I could wait that long, unless I had multiple brew pipelines staggered.

Are there suggestions for a reliable trippel recipe for a newish brewer like myself?  I've got a few all-grain batches under my belt so far.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 16, 2012, 10:42:46 AM
in secondary for 2 months?  Not sure I could wait that long, unless I had multiple brew pipelines staggered.

Are there suggestions for a reliable trippel recipe for a newish brewer like myself?  I've got a few all-grain batches under my belt so far.

When I get home tonight, I will see about posting my recipe for trippel.  I might actually pop my first one tonight... and give you my impressions.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 16, 2012, 11:02:06 PM
Note:
My grain mill grinds rather fine.  I get quite high efficiencies out of my system.  If you were to use this recipe, you might want to up the fermentables by 10%

Disclaimer:
I also used Belgian bottles with corks and cages.  If you use regular bottles with crown caps, cut the priming sugar by 40%, use 5 oz, not 9.5.  3.8 volumes of CO2 will make bottle bombs out of standard 12 and 22 oz bottles.

Having said that.  I opened the first today, after three weeks bottle conditioning at 75 degrees...  This is a REALLY good Trippel.  This is something that you do not want to rush, this one will age well.  You may want to use some 15deg Belgian candi sugar instead of table sugar, maybe 1 lb clear and 1 lb 15deg, this beer looks like a pilsner or light lager.  From brewday to first sip, it has been 70 days, but oh so worth the wait.

Another note... I did not make a yeast starter for this beer.  I used one vial of WLP530 and dumped it strait into the fermenter.  I wanted to stress the yeast, force them to produce the phenols and character that you get from a Trippel.... I let the temperature of fermentation go where it wanted, it got up to almost 80 deg.  I racked to secondary after one week and left it in secondary (it was still producing bubbles) for six weeks.

Another note:
The sparge on this beer stuck on me, I had to dump my mash tun into my kettle and back again, re-mix and re-set the grain bed to get the sparge to complete.  My brewday was 8 hours (this was a product of the fine grind that my grain mill produces) but looking back, I would do it again (maybe next time with a 10 gallon batch.....

I hope you enjoy.  If you use this recipe, let me know how it turns out.

Type: All Grain Date: 6/9/2012
Batch Size (fermenter): 5.50 gal Brewer: Chad
Boil Size: 7.48 gal Asst Brewer: 
Boil Time: 90 min Equipment: My Equipment
End of Boil Volume 5.98 gal Brewhouse Efficiency: 87.40 %
Final Bottling Volume: 5.45 gal Est Mash Efficiency 92.4 %
Fermentation: Ale, Two Stage Taste Rating(out of 50): 30.0
 

Ingredients
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
9.00 gal Westminster CA Water 1
0.50 tsp Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 
7 lbs 8.0 oz Pilsner (2 Row) Bel (1.1 SRM) Grain  58.8 %
2 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (1.8 SRM) Grain  15.7 %
12.0 oz Munich Malt (9.0 SRM) Grain  5.9 %
8.0 oz White Wheat Malt (3.1 SRM) Grain  3.9 %
0.50 oz Northern Brewer [8.50 %] - First Wort 90.0 min Hop  14.9 IBUs
2 lbs Sugar, Table (Sucrose) (1.0 SRM) Sugar  15.7 %
0.25 oz Mt. Hood [5.60 %] - Boil 30.0 min Hop  3.2 IBUs
0.50 oz Mt. Hood [5.60 %] - Boil 15.0 min Hop  4.2 IBUs
0.50 tsp Irish Moss (Boil 10.0 mins) Fining 
1.00 Items Yeast Nutrient (Boil 10.0 mins) Other 
1.0 pkg Abbey Ale (White Labs #WLP530) [35.49 ml] Yeast 
 
Beer Profile
 
Est Original Gravity: 1.079 SG Measured Original Gravity: 1.079 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.006 SG Measured Final Gravity: 1.009 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 9.7 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 9.3 %
Bitterness: 22.3 IBUs Calories: 267.0 kcal/12oz
Est Color: 3.8 SRM 
Mash Profile
 
Mash Name: Single Infusion, Light Body, No Mash Out Total Grain Weight: 12 lbs 12.0 oz
Sparge Water: 5.41 gal Grain Temperature: 72.0 F
Sparge Temperature: 168.0 F Tun Temperature: 72.0 F
Mash PH: 5.20

Mash Steps
Name Description Step Temperature Step Time
Mash In Add 15.44 qt of water at 157.6 F 148.0 F 75 min
 
Sparge Step: Fly sparge with 5.41 gal water at 168.0 F
Mash Notes: Simple single infusion mash for use with most modern well modified grains (about 95% of the time).
Carbonation and Storage
 
Carbonation Type: Bottle Volumes of CO2: 3.8
Pressure/Weight: 8.52 oz Carbonation Used: Bottle with 8.52 oz Corn Sugar
Keg/Bottling Temperature: 70.0 F Age for: 30.00 days
Fermentation: Ale, Two Stage Storage Temperature: 68.0 F
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 17, 2012, 12:13:06 PM
THANK YOU!

I usually have my local home brew place mill my grains when I buy them.   My mash tun is a rectangular cooler with the braided toilet supply line for a filter.  Knock on wood, but so far am 3 for 3 without a stuck sparge.

Minor concerns:

90 minute boil
Last batch I screwed up and lost a bunch of wort during the boil.  I've got this new 60,000 BTU propane burner from hell and am still learning the finer adjustments.   7.5 gallons allows for almost 1/3 loss, so I hope that will work out.

Fermentation
I've not messed with adding sugar as a fermentable yet.  Do you just take a hydro reading every week or so until you hit 1.006?   I'm glad my primary is an 8 gal bucket, since this sounds like turbo charged yeast.

bottling
I've always done the 3/4 cup corn sugar dissolved into 1 1/2 cup water.  I believe 3/4c is around 5oz, not the 8.5oz you reference.  It seems counter intuitive that you'd add MORE priming sugar for a yeast strain that seems powerful.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 17, 2012, 02:06:38 PM
This style traditionally is HIGHLY carbonated.  It adds to the experience of drinking the beverage.  The higher carbonation adds a tingeling on the back of the tongue, as well as carbonic acid bite that adds to mouthfeel.  The higher sugar amount is "style specific" to get the higher carbonation.  (this also creates those small "champagne" bubbles in the beer)

You can safely use 1 cp of priming sugar in standard bottles.  I like me beers a little more carbonated anyway.

With your set up, I would recommend at least 10% more on the grains.
something like:
9 lbs Belgian Pilsner
2.5 lbs 2 row
1.5 lb Munich
stick with .5 lbs wheat
and 2 lbs sugar (Candi or table) maybe trade one pound of table sugar for a pound of brown sugar or the 15* Candi

This should get you an OG ~ 1.074
As far as the WLP530, you will need a blow off tube.  It is a yeast like a diesel engine... it starts a little slow, but then charges on... and on... and on.  I had it in primary for one week, then secondary for 6 weeks

If you like the hoppiness, maybe increase hops by 5-10% as well (Trippels do traditionally have some hop aroma and flavor, but not like a Pale Ale)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 18, 2012, 10:02:37 AM
Brewing a Belgian Golden Strong for the club barrel project.
Bunch of guys brewing a similar recipe, take it all down to one of the local breweries where they are loaning us the use of two of their 55 gallon oak barrels.  Age for ~ 6-8 months and get back some fantastically yummy aged goodness.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Calichusetts on August 20, 2012, 03:05:42 PM
Brewing an extract clone of Dogfishhead Raison Detre.  After doing a couple crowd pleaser batches, this one is just for me.  I first tried this back in 04 and it really left an impression.  In fact, I haven't had one since moving west in 06. 

I was curious to see what others thought of this beer, so I've been reading reviews and found that this is definately a love it or hate it style.    It seems to fall into the category of Belgain Strong Dark with Abbey yeast (I Used WL Abbey IV, sub'd for Wyeast Abbey II), golden raisins, dark belgian candy syrup, and brown sugar.  It uses .5oz warrior at 60, and .5 oz Vanguard (I had to sub Hallertau) at flameout. 

There were a couple subs I had to make for steeping grains that seem to have resulted in a significant overshoot on the color that was immediately apparent upon the first dunk.  It's supposed to be light to medium brown, but it's looking an awful lot like a porter at this early stage, but there are a lot of solids that still need to settle out too.  When I ran the recipe through brewers friend, it predicted an OG of 1070 (I got 1072) and an IBU of 25.  Gravity on the extract clones is a bit short of the real deal having an 8% ABV...I think that's the tradeoff to try to keep this from turning into a deep dark mess that seems to have happened anyway.  The wort is delicious though. 

This is the first brew I get to try out in my Son Of Fermentation Chiller DIY project.  It is working like a charm at 65F in my 80F closet.  Thanks to Ken Schwartz whererver you are!

We've been drinking my first brew (A Sierra Nevada-ish recipe) for about a week now, and we really like the way it turned out despite having fermented it warmer than optimal between 78-80.  I also bottled my #2 brew, a Saison this weekend.  It's tasting great already and had a surprising amount of residual CO2 in it...at least in terms of mouthfeel.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on September 01, 2012, 06:15:17 PM
I got some blackberries from my boss. I just threw 'em in a bucket with 3 lbs of honey and a gallon of water. Now I just need to twiddle my thumbs for a year and I'll have a delicious blackberry mead!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 02, 2012, 09:24:33 PM
Followed Grey Wolf's trippel recipe posted above.  Only been in primary 2 days, but bubbling away.

That was my first 90 minute boil.  I lost a lot more water than I expected.  Luckily added back 1.5 gallons of filtered water and ended up with OG of 1.074.  Also, my brew shop was out of candi sugar, so tried a new local product:

http://www.cascadebeercandi.com/

It'll be around Halloween when this should be ready.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 04, 2012, 10:31:48 AM
Update on the Trippel recipe.
I opened the first bottle outside of my own man cave last week.  Brew club meeting and the results were unanimous (spelling?)  Everyone wanted to know what the recipe was. They all really liked it.  Very well balanced fruitiness, bitterness and sweetness.  Very "digestable" as the Belgians say... it attenuated really well, rather dry.  With the higher level of carbonation, the small champagne bubbles add the mouthfeel.  Really can't tell that the alcohol level is almost at 10%. 

My next step for this beer is a competition on the 22nd.  The best of show for the comp will be brewed at a local brewery, where their head brewer will work with the winning beers creater to make the beer commercially...  It may be a little bit of a long shot, but I think I really have a shot at it. ** crosses fingers **
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 09, 2012, 01:14:22 PM
Whoa - took my first hyrdo reading and it's just past 1.010  !!!

Started at 1.075, and it's only been 10 days.  I tasted the beer I hydro'd and while it's not "done", I can see where it's headed.

I think the difference was a new strain of Belgian Wyeast the brew shop suggested:
http://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=136

Given that the beer is nearly 9% now, and it clearly still bubbling, it might reach the 12% threshold of the yeast.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on September 09, 2012, 02:31:41 PM
I got some blackberries from my boss. I just threw 'em in a bucket with 3 lbs of honey and a gallon of water. Now I just need to twiddle my thumbs for a year and I'll have a delicious blackberry mead!
and you added yeast i hope? ;) or are you going completely wild? in the wild case, you'll need a year..
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 09, 2012, 04:08:17 PM
Whoa - took my first hyrdo reading and it's just past 1.010  !!!

Started at 1.075, and it's only been 10 days.  I tasted the beer I hydro'd and while it's not "done", I can see where it's headed.

I think the difference was a new strain of Belgian Wyeast the brew shop suggested:
http://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=136

Given that the beer is nearly 9% now, and it clearly still bubbling, it might reach the 12% threshold of the yeast.

Wow!  Happy yeast = good beer.  Can't wait to see how it turns out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on September 12, 2012, 08:28:53 AM
and you added yeast i hope? ;) or are you going completely wild? in the wild case, you'll need a year..

Haha thanks for checking Arch, I definitely added the yeast/tannins/campden/acid!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 2ADefense on November 05, 2012, 01:04:28 PM
I bought a Mr. Beer a couple of months ago, and made both of the recipes that came with it (Czech Pilsner and Aztec).  While the beers were fine, better than expected actually, the process didn't really feel like 'brewing'.  It was more like 'mix and wait'. 

I've been thinking about ditching the Mr. Beer and moving to full batches, but I wanted to try an actual homebrew recipe to see if it would be something I'd enjoy before forking over for more equipment (specifically a big brew kettle). 

I visited my local homebrew shop, and they helped me put together an APA recipe which I brewed yesterday.  The guy at the store recommended just taking one of their standard recipes and cutting it in half.  That sounded odd to me, as 2 gallons is not half of 5 gallons, but he assured me it would be fine.

The experience was definitely more complicated and engaging than the Mr. Beer refills!  There's a lot of involvement - this recipe had 5 separate hop additions, and steeping specialty grains.  There are also consequences for not paying attention - I had a brief boilover.  :o  I'll wait to taste the beer before I get too excited, but I did enjoy the process of brewing.  If this recipe is good, I'll probably make it one more time in the Mr. Beer, as I still have half of the hops I purchased, and then step up to bigger batches.

"Just a Pale Ale" recipe, Mr. Beer style
Grains (Steeped at 150 for 30 mins)
-.5 lb Crystal 60L
-.25 lb Munich
-.25 lb Wheat

Malt Extract (60 min boil)
3.3 lbs Light LME

Hops (Added to boil)
.5 oz Columbus (60 min)
.25 oz Cascade (45 min)
.25 oz Centennial (30 min)
.25 oz Cascade (15 min)
.25 oz Centennial (end of boil)

Wyeast 1056 American (full packet)

This morning, it looks like the yeast is going to town, so I guess I'm on the right track.  I bought a hydrometer as well, and if I read it right (big IF), I got 1.054 prior to putting the yeast in.  That's within the range suggested by the recipe (1.051 to 1.054), so I think this could actually work.  I'll send updates as it goes along.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 06, 2012, 07:07:31 PM
The experience was definitely more complicated and engaging than the Mr. Beer refills!  There's a lot of involvement - this recipe had 5 separate hop additions, and steeping specialty grains.  There are also consequences for not paying attention - I had a brief boilover.  :o  I'll wait to taste the beer before I get too excited, but I did enjoy the process of brewing.  If this recipe is good, I'll probably make it one more time in the Mr. Beer, as I still have half of the hops I purchased, and then step up to bigger batches.

"Just a Pale Ale" recipe, Mr. Beer style
Grains (Steeped at 150 for 30 mins)
-.5 lb Crystal 60L
-.25 lb Munich
-.25 lb Wheat

Malt Extract (60 min boil)
3.3 lbs Light LME

Hops (Added to boil)
.5 oz Columbus (60 min)
.25 oz Cascade (45 min)
.25 oz Centennial (30 min)
.25 oz Cascade (15 min)
.25 oz Centennial (end of boil)

Wyeast 1056 American (full packet)

This morning, it looks like the yeast is going to town, so I guess I'm on the right track.  I bought a hydrometer as well, and if I read it right (big IF), I got 1.054 prior to putting the yeast in.  That's within the range suggested by the recipe (1.051 to 1.054), so I think this could actually work.  I'll send updates as it goes along.

Everything looks good to me.  As long as you practice good sanitation, I think you will end up with a really enjoyable brew.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: KellyAnn on November 07, 2012, 06:23:07 PM
Holiday Ale (Brewer's Best kit).  No beer explosions this time around, huzzah!!  Should be out of the bucket & into the bottles this weekend or the next.  Hopefully we'll be able to drink some at Thanksgiving.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on November 07, 2012, 07:13:13 PM
Have 6 gal of Amarone and 3 gl of Perry in fermenters right now.  Couple more batches ready to start once I have equipment freed up.  Guess it's time to head down to the wine bar and pick up some more of their once-used free bottles!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 07, 2012, 07:34:22 PM
The combination of brewing longer duration recipes, and drinking more lately has led to a semi-serious supply chain issue for me.

Have CA lager, Belgian bottled, and haven't done a malty ale in a while. Thinking I may make a holiday IPA next. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 10, 2012, 11:07:21 AM
I think I will be having that supply chain issue in about two months... I'm moving in about 4 weeks, though I have two beers in fermentors now; the barleywine, just one week in primary (aiming for two or three) and then it will be in secondary for about 2-3 months, and the Belgian Dubbel which is in secondary now, which will probably be there for another 4 weeks.

Thinking that the next brew for me will be a Bohemian Pilsner, lagered to perfection... mmmm can't wait
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 10, 2012, 06:24:06 PM
It's cool enough up here now that I can probably do lagers in my garage until early spring.   

BTW: I just racked my 2nd iteration of your Trippel recipe.  This time around I used a darker syrup, and bumped up the hops about 20%.
For whatever reason there was a ridiculous amount of trubb in the bottom of my bucket.  I salvaged most and will harvest the yeast.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on November 20, 2012, 10:21:35 PM
I will be celebrating Thanksgiving by making a cranberry wine!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on November 21, 2012, 12:24:26 PM
I will be celebrating Thanksgiving by making a cranberry wine!
woohoo!!!


i picked up 5 gallons of raw, unfiltered apple cyder a few weeks ago. Now I have 3 different 1 gallon carboys going with 3 different yeasts to see what the results are... (my son drank the other 2 gallons)...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 21, 2012, 12:38:27 PM
My long weekend includes this:

http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/24867/name-this-recipe

BTW: looking for a clever name
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on November 21, 2012, 01:14:06 PM
My long weekend includes this:

http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/24867/name-this-recipe

BTW: looking for a clever name

hmm, lots of sweet stuff there.. How about 'Sweet lovins'?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 21, 2012, 01:29:58 PM
hmm, lots of sweet stuff there.. How about 'Sweet lovins'?

I really doubt it'll finish sweet.  That's all fuel for the monster yeast that will result in 9%+ ABV
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on November 21, 2012, 01:52:03 PM
I really doubt it'll finish sweet.  That's all fuel for the monster yeast that will result in 9%+ ABV
better add some sucrose then...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 24, 2012, 10:17:24 AM
I did a double brew day again yesterday, as this is the last brew day until the move is complete.  Brewed a Bohemian pilsner, which I used American 2 Row.  I did a single decoction mash, which after I was done I realized that I had done it incorrectly. 
I decocted 7 qrts and started to boil, which is correct, but the problem was I boiled the grist for 45 minutes.  The non decocted portion was held at 130 degrees for about an hour and a half.  If I had been using "less-modified" malt, this might not have been a problem.  But being that I used highly modified 2 row, this beer may end up without much body.  The only thing that may help is the fact that I did boil the grist as long as i did.  Going to give it the lager treatment, primary fermentation at 48 degrees for 2-3 weeks and then lager it for 4-6 weeks.

I also brewed a brown ale that will get a pound and a half of maple syrup in secondary.  I wasn't thinking when I started the mash for this one by starting it to early, my kettle still had the pilsner in it... The mash for the brown was held at 154 for almost 2 hours.  This will also lead to a beer that will probably be a bit thin... not to mention the fact that I will be adding the fermentables (maple syrup) later in the fermentation.

It's cool enough up here now that I can probably do lagers in my garage until early spring.   

BTW: I just racked my 2nd iteration of your Trippel recipe.  This time around I used a darker syrup, and bumped up the hops about 20%.
For whatever reason there was a ridiculous amount of trubb in the bottom of my bucket.  I salvaged most and will harvest the yeast.

It'll be interesting to see how the changes affect the flavor.

My long weekend includes this:

http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/24867/name-this-recipe

BTW: looking for a clever name

The Bitter Monk
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on November 25, 2012, 10:15:30 AM
A thin brown ale? I think you may have inadvertently invented a new style Grewywolf  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 25, 2012, 02:49:19 PM
The "Bitter Monk" is in primary fermentation.  Starting gravity was 1.090.  Brew calculation had 1.095, so I'm pretty happy to have gotten as close and maintained volume during the process.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on November 26, 2012, 11:42:21 AM
Brewed a Spotted Cow replica, 4 weeks and we'll see what it tastes like.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 28, 2012, 05:00:05 PM
A thin brown ale? I think you may have inadvertently invented a new style Grewywolf  ;D

I have definitely made a "thin" brown before... actuall all of the browns I have brewed ended up thin... :(
My mash ended up being 2 hours long... so I hope the b-amalyse didn't strip all of the dextrins out of the wort.  It just about finished primary in about 3 days... will see how it is when I rack into secondary.  (I thought I would have a 5 gal fermenter free by the time this one was done... nope... *sigh*)  I'm actually picking one up from a buddy in the brew club... is it wrong to have four 5 gal batches getting ready for bottling?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 28, 2012, 05:58:53 PM
is it wrong to have four 5 gal batches getting ready for bottling?

No, but I pity whoever has to sanitize 20 gallons worth of bottles and crowns.  A kegging system would be very appealing in that situation.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 28, 2012, 07:56:42 PM
Yeah... tell me about it...
The kegging set up is not planned until later next year, gotta make it through the holidays first

*SIGH*
Life will go on.  I will bottle beer... and drink it afterwards!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: RS on December 09, 2012, 03:13:11 PM
I have a basic 5 gallon bucket kit. This will be my second batch I've ever made. It is an American Pale Ale kit. The beer has about a week left till I think it can be bottled. 

This has been a fun hobbie to start and I've learned a lot.  My goal is to build a wort chiller after buying a few other accessories this next year. 

I signed up to 13 skills and put brewing as one since I'm just starting.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on December 09, 2012, 04:15:59 PM
Is it wrong to have four 5 gal batches getting ready for bottling?

wow.... I just bottled 10 gallons. I feel your pain.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on December 09, 2012, 04:45:42 PM
wow.... I just bottled 10 gallons. I feel your pain.

In full disclosure, one 5 gal batch is a barleywine that will be aged for at least 6 months before I bottle, 5 gals of a dubbel brewed the last week of October that I will not be bottling until January, 5 gal of the maple brown that might get bottled this week, and a pilsner that will have 2 months in lager... sooo in reality it is spread out.  It is also motivation to get into kegging.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on December 13, 2012, 06:55:50 AM
In full disclosure, one 5 gal batch is a barleywine that will be aged for at least 6 months before I bottle

Enjoy the barleywine!  I just dipped into last year's batch about a month ago and it is YUMMY!  When I bottled it, I pulled about a gallon off and stuck it in the freezer and made iced barleywine out of it.  Whew!  That's got some kick!

Started a batch of honey ale last night.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on December 16, 2012, 08:11:22 AM
Brewed a Spotted Cow replica, 4 weeks and we'll see what it tastes like.

Bottled all 5gal of it. Just needs to carbonate.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on January 04, 2013, 05:21:58 PM
5 gallon batch of honey ale now bottled.  hmmm...what do I start tomorrow.  Maybe a brown ale....
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 05, 2013, 12:13:29 PM
I have a light english brown that's on the nutty/caramel side, one week fermented.  That was my first batch where I hand milled the grains myself.  The $20 Corona grain mill works ok, but I did have to get rough with it as the finishing work was sloppy.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on January 06, 2013, 11:28:17 AM
20 gallons, ouch! I finally just bit the bullet and got some kegging supplies since I got three brew kits in December  :o

I have two meads and a wine going. I just kegged an ESB, I'm brewing a Dogfish Head 60 minute IPA clone today and then in a week or so I will be brewing a Black IPA, yum!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 07, 2013, 09:44:39 AM
I just kegged an ESB, I'm brewing a Dogfish Head 60 minute IPA clone today and then in a week or so I will be brewing a Black IPA, yum!

Are you doing some sort of continuous hop addition like what Dogfish uses?  I have to say, I have become quite fond of their IPAs... the "east coast" beers seem to me to be more malt forward, compared to some of the hop bombs that come from the west coast.

I think I will be doing another double brewday this coming weekend.  I think I'll do a black saison and a bock or doppelbock
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on January 20, 2013, 10:33:31 AM
Brown ale has a few more days in secondary before going in the bottle.

Just started a 'light summery ale' with some honey, dried orange peel, and coriander.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 20, 2013, 02:36:33 PM
Just started a 'light summery ale' with some honey, dried orange peel, and coriander.

Sounds delicious!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on January 20, 2013, 04:17:39 PM
Sounds delicious!

Thanks!  I'm looking forward to it.  Will definitely post on how it turns out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 21, 2013, 09:44:45 AM
Brown ale has a few more days in secondary before going in the bottle.

Just started a 'light summery ale' with some honey, dried orange peel, and coriander.

Care to share a recipe?

Thanks
-S
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on January 21, 2013, 10:49:18 AM
Sure thing...Keep in mind it's still in primary.  I have not tasted it.  It's actually a kit I got from Midwest.  They called it Grand Cru.  Recipe:

6# extra light dry malt extract
2# clover honey
8oz carapils
2oz Hallertau (1oz for bittering and 1oz for aroma)
1/2 oz dried sweet orange peel
1oz coriander
5oz priming sugar
Wyeast Belgian wit #3944

Steep grains 30 mins at 155 degrees; remove from heat and steep for another 10 mins before removing.  Add DME, return to the burner and bring to a boil before adding 1oz of hops.  Boil 60 mins.  With 15 mins left in the boil, add honey.  Add orange peel, coriander, and remaining 1oz hops for the last 5 mins.  All standard from there...cool to below 80, pitch yeast, and you're off to the races.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 21, 2013, 11:29:35 AM
Sure thing...Keep in mind it's still in primary.  I have not tasted it.  It's actually a kit I got from Midwest.  They called it Grand Cru.  Recipe:

6# extra light dry malt extract
2# clover honey
8oz carapils
2oz Hallertau (1oz for bittering and 1oz for aroma)
1/2 oz dried sweet orange peel
1oz coriander
5oz priming sugar
Wyeast Belgian wit #3944

Steep grains 30 mins at 155 degrees; remove from heat and steep for another 10 mins before removing.  Add DME, return to the burner and bring to a boil before adding 1oz of hops.  Boil 60 mins.  With 15 mins left in the boil, add honey.  Add orange peel, coriander, and remaining 1oz hops for the last 5 mins.  All standard from there...cool to below 80, pitch yeast, and you're off to the races.

Thanks - I'll have to do some conversions, as I've recently become an all-grain snob  8)

edit:  looks like I found a cheat sheet:
http://jaysbrewingblog.com/2011/11/17/lazy-chart-for-converting-dme-lme-grain/

6# DME shakes out to ~10# of grain.  I expect the 2# of honey to kick up the ABV % - albeit gradually over time.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on January 21, 2013, 12:58:23 PM
Thanks - I'll have to do some conversions, as I've recently become an all-grain snob  8)

That's on my 13 in 13 list.  :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 21, 2013, 02:36:38 PM
That's on my 13 in 13 list.  :)

If you have all-grain questions, I've recently made all the dumb mistakes. 

I converted an ice chest to a mashtun for around $30 in plumbing hardware.  The hardest/most costly part is a large boil kettle.  I went with a cheapo 10gal alum. pot, but a stainless steel one with a valve would be ideal.  You will end up saving money on malt compared to LME or DME.  Esp. if you are willing to buy in 55# sacks @ ~$0.75/lbs.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 21, 2013, 09:58:07 PM
That is virtually the same set up I have.  I have an aluminum kettle (tamale steamer) that I use for heating strike water, its about 6 or 7 gallons total.  I have the 10 gal Igloo cooler that I replaced the push valve with a stainless 1/2" ball valve, with a coupling to 1/2" MPT to 3/8" male barb.  I connect this via a 4" section of tubing to my false bottom.  I also replaced the valve on a 5 gallon cooler that I use to hold my sparge water.  My boil kettle is a 9 gallon Bayou Classic SS kettle with spigot.  I use the Camp Chef two propane burner, they are ~ 50,000 BTU each and the whole thing is about $100.00 (just the burners)

I buy my grain in bulk, the local brew supply shop offers discounts to members of local brew clubs (10% off all purchases).  So the 50# sack of 2 row that normally goes for $36.00 ends up ~ $33.00.  I normally get about 6 to 7 batches out of a sack.  My last purchase was 1 50# domestic 2 row and one 55# German Pilsner malt, total was ~ $90.  This will last me about a year or 12-14 five gallon batches... that's 24 cases of beer....  not to mention I am making Belgian Dubbels and Trippels, Bohemian Pilsners, Bocks, Barleywines, Saisons and more... many of which would sell for $30+ for a case...

All grain can be expensive to get started (especially if you are already making extract brews).  If you see yourself making beer on out until the end of the world comes... I would recommend it.  I would also look into a local brew club.  The information that you can glean is unreal.  They will also be able to diagnose any issues you may have with your current beer and or give you some recommendations on where to go to get deals or even offer you some used equipment for cheap.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 21, 2013, 10:12:16 PM
It's unreasonable that brew shops in SoCal have cheaper malt prices compared with Seattle :)

With my current fermenting trippel, the yeast I pitched was salvaged from a previous batch and saved in the fridge for 3 months in mason jars.
It worked beautifully.  Also, I've got hops growing in the side yard. Remind me to post a report next August... Apparently a century earlier the entire valley I live in, that's now suburban sprawl, was hop farms from Mt. Rainier until Lake Washington.

I mention all this as it relates to home brew self sufficiency.  It's not just for MadMax, but what if there's a crop failure, or other supply chain disruption?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 22, 2013, 09:34:12 AM
I have a couple hop rhyzomes that I have had in pots since last year, they will be going into the ground this spring. 

I am also considering planting some barley... maybe next fall.  From what I have read, a 20x40 plot of land should produce one bushel ~ 47 lbs, I may look into planting 40x40 or 20x80 (will see how much space is taken up with raised beds and my orchard). The seed requirement will be ~ 5 lbs to cover 20x40 (which will cost ~ $9.00-$10.00)  My available time will determine whether I even attempt this.  The next step would be home malting.

The bock I made two weeks ago had 50% of the grainbill of home roasted pilsner malt, which was roasted to ~ Munich malt... in my oven.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: wraithe on February 03, 2013, 06:02:27 AM
Did my first brew since about 1998 two weeks ago. A stout kit, malt extract and grain. Started very slow, very little blow off, it was my first time using 6-1/2 gallon carboys instead of 5 gallon, and it seems to have finished okay. I reracked it last night, going to let it go for another week, then bottle and see how it works out. Helped a friend do his first "big kid" batch of beer as well. He had done several Mr. Beer size brews. He seems to like 5 gallon brews much better.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on February 09, 2013, 10:46:37 AM
I kegged my ESB... it only lasted a month  :o

Recent projects: I bottled my blackberry mead and it is now aging, cranbery wine still in secondary, I have one regular mead in the secondary and one in the primary.

I kegged a Dogfish Head 60 min IPA clone, it's got some maturing to do. I have a hoppy amber in a secondary (I made this with leftover yeast and hops from the Dogfish Head Clone as well as some more hops a friend picked, I ended up spending like $12 on malt, cheapest beer I've ever made! If it ends up good I'll share the recipe).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on February 09, 2013, 10:47:35 AM
Did my first brew since about 1998 two weeks ago.

Welcome back!  ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 09, 2013, 02:26:35 PM
I just bottled 5.5 gallons of Belgian strong ale.

Have my first lager still lagering in my garage.

I keep talking myself out of kegging.  I can get a "picnic" setup for around $225 locally, but that doesn't include the kegerator portion.
With being resourceful and lots of DIY work a nice setup can be had for $400, but difficult to justify financially for me.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: snickers on February 10, 2013, 10:08:34 AM

I keep talking myself out of kegging.  I can get a "picnic" setup for around $225 locally, but that doesn't include the kegerator portion.
With being resourceful and lots of DIY work a nice setup can be had for $400, but difficult to justify financially for me.

My uncle gave me some old corny kegs close to two years ago, but he didn't have any of the other supplies I needed (like a CO2 tank or the lines) so I put it off for a long time, not wanting to spend money. I don't need much fridge space, so I just took some shelves out of my fridge and put the keg right into it without building a kegerator system.

The kegs themselves run for $35-50 on Craigs List, the CO2 tank and gas flow regulator can be pricey though.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: wraithe on February 10, 2013, 02:27:33 PM
Welcome back!  ;D

Thanks!!  :D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Sunnylandcamper on February 10, 2013, 06:20:58 PM
I have 6 gal of apple wine brewing and 6 gal of grape brewing.. I have been keeping one gal of each and have 10 gal ageing for atleast a year. in march I will have been makeing wine for a year.. I love doing it it is a lot cheaper and I get to say I made this. My friends love drinking it also. One thing is I like harder stuff...I once took a gal and frooze it and strained off the liquide to get it stronger but it still not quite what Im looking for. Been thinking about getting an electric water still.....
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 10, 2013, 10:41:29 PM
11 gallons bottled this weekend.  First time nothing in fermentation a for long time.  I've got enough pilsner malt in semi-LTS for 3 more 5 gal batches. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on February 11, 2013, 07:55:28 AM
Been thinking about getting an electric water still.....

For the purposes of making fuel... of course...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Sunnylandcamper on February 14, 2013, 10:07:50 PM
For the purposes of making fuel... of course...

of course e85 lol or as LBP says meat marenade
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 04, 2013, 08:55:13 AM
Brewed up my first SMaSH beer yesterday (single malt and single hop).  A nice hoppy American Pale Ale with 2 row and Centennial hops.

6 gallon batch

9 # domestic 2 row
6 hop additions:
mash hop w/ .25 oz
first wort hop with .5 oz
30 minutes .25 oz
20 minutes .25 oz
10 minutes 1 oz
flame out 1.75 oz
(The larger additions of late hops is a technique called "hop bursting", which gives really big hop flavor and aroma)
I will dry hop with 2 oz of Centennial once primary is complete.

For the mash, I used the batch sparge technique.  I pulled the first sparge, boiled it for 30 minutes (to try and get a little kettle caramelization character out of the plain 2 row malt), then added the second sparge to the reduced wort and finished with an hour boil with the above additions.

I will ferment with WLP099, White Labs' San Diego super yeast, at 64-66 degrees.  I will bottle to 2.4 volumes of CO2.  Should be ready to drink in about 3 weeks.

The greatest thing about this brew... materials cost will be: ~ $19.00
I have two Centennial hop plants that should produce some hops this fall, I will brew this beer again with the homegrown hops, which will reduce the cost of making the beer to about $10.00
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 04, 2013, 09:52:07 AM
Brewed up my first SMaSH beer yesterday (single malt and single hop).  A nice hoppy American Pale Ale with 2 row and Centennial hops.

6 gallon batch

9 # domestic 2 row
6 hop additions:
mash hop w/ .25 oz
first wort hop with .5 oz
30 minutes .25 oz
20 minutes .25 oz
10 minutes 1 oz
flame out 1.75 oz
(The larger additions of late hops is a technique called "hop bursting", which gives really big hop flavor and aroma)
I will dry hop with 2 oz of Centennial once primary is complete.

For the mash, I used the batch sparge technique.  I pulled the first sparge, boiled it for 30 minutes (to try and get a little kettle caramelization character out of the plain 2 row malt), then added the second sparge to the reduced wort and finished with an hour boil with the above additions.

I will ferment with WLP099, White Labs' San Diego super yeast, at 64-66 degrees.  I will bottle to 2.4 volumes of CO2.  Should be ready to drink in about 3 weeks.

The greatest thing about this brew... materials cost will be: ~ $19.00
I have two Centennial hop plants that should produce some hops this fall, I will brew this beer again with the homegrown hops, which will reduce the cost of making the beer to about $10.00

I also have a pair of centennial hop plants I started last year.   I really like your approach here, as I started buying grain in 55# bags.  It cuts the price to more than half.  That plus harvesting yeast almost makes brewing sustainable. To store I just emptied unmilled grain into 5 gal buckets with an o2 absorber.  I'm not trying to preserve for years, just 3-6 months, so I skimped on the mylar.

Yesterday I experimented with toasting malt.  I had half a sack of pilsner (20+ lbs), and toasted about 3 pounds to medium-dark.  Given the batch will cost less than $20, I'm not pressured for things to turn out perfect.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 04, 2013, 10:37:49 AM
Yesterday I experimented with toasting malt.  I had half a sack of pilsner (20+ lbs), and toasted about 3 pounds to medium-dark.  Given the batch will cost less than $20, I'm not pressured for things to turn out perfect.

about 6 or 7 weeks ago, I toasted up some pilsner malt, which I used in a bock (I used 6 lbs pilsner and 6 lbs of the home toasted "Munich" malt) that I put into my lagering chest freezer this weekend.  350 degress for 15 minutes, stiring every 5 minutes to ensure an even toast and no scorching.  That recipe I triple decocted (long brew day... 10 hours from set up to clean up) the initial tasting is very good, though with all of the caramelization from the decoction there is quite a bit of residual sweetness.  We shall see how it does after a month of lagering and some carbonation.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 04, 2013, 11:51:42 AM
here's a bonus stupid question for the day...

Over the weekend I was going through my food preps, and discovered we had about 8 lbs. of powdered sugar.  My wife and I are about 75% paleo, and rarely eat sugary treats, so this won't get used up anytime soon.  Beer and alcohol are notable exception  ;)

Anyhow, I understand powdered sugar contains cornstarch to prevent caking, which might result in cloudy beer or off tastes if added as a fermentable.

However, what if I added powdered sugar to the mash?  It stands to reason the mashing process could convert some or all of the corn starch to sugar.  I might try it to see what happens.  Doubt it'll ruin my batch.  Any thoughts?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 04, 2013, 01:53:32 PM
Hmmmm, yeah, I don't think you would have a problem adding to the mash.  If the starches are converted, you will get gravity points, without any mouthfeel.  Your fermentation will attenuate, which will thin the beer.  Depending on the style, that may be what you are going for, my tripel recipe uses 2 lbs of table sugar in the last 10 minutes of the boil.  I also have taken to adding a pound of sugar to my Double IPAs for this reason.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: hd45hunt on March 08, 2013, 09:12:52 PM
Back after a little hiatus from brewing.  Tomorrow brings a Smoked Maple Amber Ale extract recipe which starts with boiling 8 gallons of my maple sap down to 3 gallons (bittering-Cascade/aroma-Northern Brewer).  This was really good last year.   My last couple of 10g all grain batches have been Cream Ale's (for a house beer), so I'm thinkin of substituting maple sap for any water in the 10 gal batch and adding a small amount (1/2-1 pound) of smoked and/or chocolate malt to the grain bill for a little color in my Cream Ale recipe and see what happens.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 09, 2013, 10:34:52 AM
Yesterday racked a strong Belgian after 3.5 weeks in primary.

Today I'm in total mad scientist mode, concocting a recipe from leftover ingredients.

10# pilsner
3# toasted pilsner (did this myself in cast iron skillet)
2# powdered sugar (added to mash)
1oz magnum hops @ 60min
.5oz hallertau @ 15min
.5oz hallertau @ 1min

Harvested Wyeast Bavarian lager yeast

Speaking of that, my mash is about done.  Gotta finish the boil before my son's basketball game at noon.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 11, 2013, 09:07:59 AM
Brewed up a dark saison that I am calling Apparition.
9 lbs pilsner malt
2 lbs vienna malt
4 oz caramunich
2 oz chocolate wheat
1 lb D-180 dark candi sugar
6 oz piloncilla sugar
2 oz willamette hops 60 mins
.55 oz tettnang hops 20 mins
75 min mash @ 147
2 hour boil
I have grown up two vials of WLP 565 Saison I yeast in a 2 quart starter
I'm going to pitch the yeast at ~ 66 degress and let the temp rise as far as it wants to go... could be 80+
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: stevedi on May 01, 2013, 03:03:38 PM
Hi All!  Just bottled an American Amber Ale last weekend, and can't wait wait to try it; it cleared up so nice in the bottle already, and what I sampled at bottling time was already pretty good.  This weekend (assuming I have enough time) I'm planning on brewing a Hefeweizen.  Got all the ingredients; this will be my first time using liquid yeast (Wyeast Weihenstephan 3068) for an authentic Hefe. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on May 02, 2013, 08:56:45 AM
Nice stevedi!  I have been brewing for two years and have yet to brew a hefe or even a witbier.  I think the first beer that I brew that will have more then just a small amount of wheat will be a sour, I'm still working on the recipe... I'm leaning toward straight lambic, this will be my first attempt at sours... kinda sucks I'll have to wait a year to see how it turns out.

Welcome to the TSP forum!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: stevedi on May 02, 2013, 10:23:57 AM
Thanks GW!  I've been brewing for about 16 yrs on and off (mostly off), but picked it up again last year after one of Jack's 2011 podcasts inspired me!   ;)  I brewed a Kolsch last year with about a pound of wheat DME, and I want to tell you that beer was awesome!  All my friends loved it.  The last time I brewed a wheat beer was an American style wheat years ago, and I used dry yeast.  The fermentation was nuts and blew off the air lock, but those were the bad old days when I was in a condo and couldn't control the temperature very well.  Now I have a real basement and it's a pretty stable 66 degrees down there so this should work out much better.  I'll still use a blow-off hose just in case!  I'm using a Northern Brewer kit for the Hefe and it couldn't be easier - no secondary either since it's a wheat.  Funny you should mention lambic\sours as I was just reading about them last night.  Interesting style, but as you said it will be hard to wait that long for the results!   ;D
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 02, 2013, 10:52:17 AM
Welcome stevedi

I've had a run of good Belgians recently, and am now returning to my roots with some northwest ales.  I've got 4 centennial hop bines creeping up ropes as we speak.  Should have flowers to harvest this August.  Before an aphid outbreak a century ago, south Puget Sound, from Olympia to the south shore of Lake Washington was mostly hop fields.  I figure I should leverage that.

Leaf hops are less convenient to work with (stick to equipment, clog valves and siphons), but for hop forward styles, I really dig my fresh hops.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on May 02, 2013, 10:53:28 AM
Good luck with it and certainly use that blow off tube.  In my experience, any beer with a large wheat component usually has a fairly violent ferment.

When you get the chance, please stop over at the Intro Thread (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.0) and introduce yourself.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on May 04, 2013, 12:17:18 AM
made 10gal of beer (chocolate porter)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: stevedi on May 06, 2013, 10:18:03 AM
Fritz, you're not kidding - I brewed the Hefe on Saturday afternoon, and by yesterday morning it was already blowing off krausen and a lot of gas, so I'm very glad I used the blow-off tube.  Even with that I was checking it every few hours because  the pressure was pushing the top of the (plastic bucket) fermenter, and I could hear the sizzle of gas escaping from the rim seal.  There was all kinds of yeastie mayhem going on in there!  This is one time I wished I'd used my carboy/secondary as a primary so I could watch the craziness.  By this morning it had calmed down quite a bit and just blowing a bubble out every few seconds.  Smells beautiful!  I think I'll replace the blow-off with a regular air lock tonight.   ;)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 06, 2013, 02:17:10 PM
Yesterday I pitched a 6 month old Wyeast smack pack.  I noticed the thing only partially swelled after slapping.  12 hours later, there's no visible fermentation in my carboy :(

I'll check again this afternoon when I'm home, but am a bit nervous/sad :(
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: stevedi on May 06, 2013, 02:32:21 PM
Smurf, I'm sorry to hear that.  I think six months is about the upper limit on Wyeast.  How long did you give it to swell?  I know they recommend a day or more before pitching if it's more than a few months old.  I'd give it a little more time to show some signs though - another 12 hrs wouldn't be unreasonable.  Good news is, if it's still showing no activity at that point,  you should be able to rescue the batch with another pitch if you have some dry yeast on hand, or go to your LHBS (if you have one) and pick up a fresh smack pack.  This is my first experience with Wyeast, but the one I used was really fresh, and was completely swollen in about 5 hrs. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 07, 2013, 11:42:06 AM
I plan to pickup a fresh smack pack after work today.  I'll wait another 24 hours and pitch it if I see activity.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: wabear on May 29, 2013, 01:28:40 PM
Getting ready to bottle a Scottish 80/  Indiana Homebrew Competition is in June and I need to have it carbonated before I enter it.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on May 29, 2013, 11:11:13 PM
Brewed some dunkelweizen. And finally bottled all that porter 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: ID_Joker on June 27, 2013, 08:46:39 AM
Started 5g of porter last weekend.  Yesterday my Koji Kin (malted rice) was finally ready so I started a batch of sake.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 27, 2013, 10:40:02 AM
Latest incarnation of Belgian Trippel went into primary Sunday evening.  Last night before bed the airlock was STILL bubbling and a thick head was visible in the carboy.

I made some minor tweaks to my mash process, and increased the ratio of water to grain.
Also, I added the candi syrup during the last 10 minutes of the boil, whereas I'd previously stirred in just after flame out.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on July 03, 2013, 01:02:49 PM
ID_Joker: it will be interesting to see how the sake turns out.  I have been thinking about doing some of that for some time.

Smurf: The trippel I did a year ago fermented like that, even with me letting the temp free rise up to low-mid 80s.  The WLP530 took quite a while to do its job... but it definitely did it.

I have an Irish red in secondary that I believe has an infection.  I had washed some WLP028 that I had used to make a Scottish ale for a club barrel project, but it appears that I may have gotten some contaminants in there.  After 7 days, there was a huge krausen, but the gravity was only down 5 points to 1.038 (OG was 1.043)  There was a brutal smell of sulphur and DMS on it.  I have bumped up the temperature to see if that will help clean it up, if at all.  Worst case, this will become my first sour beer.  I have been holding onto a vial of WLP 655, Belgian Sour I, with the thought that I would make a lambic.  I haven't gotten around to making the base for the lambic, and now that I have a beer that may not be something I would want to drink, I may just throw the bugs into it... it certainly can't make the beer any worse.
Other than the above, I will be brewing my Maple Brown and an IPA on Friday.  I picked up some Mosaic hops and have heard great things about IPAs made with them.
The above two beers, brown and IPA, I plan to have on tap for my house warming part in two and a half weeks.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on August 05, 2013, 05:24:23 PM
American amber in primary, Brown ale in secondary
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on August 07, 2013, 05:44:59 AM
5g of IPA, changed it up just a little with 1/2 lb chocolate malt to see if I could make it slightly darker
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 07, 2013, 08:39:31 AM
5g of IPA, changed it up just a little with 1/2 lb chocolate malt to see if I could  it slightly darker

What was your grain bill/recipe?  1/2 lb chocolate will give you some color.  Might give you slight hints of vanilla/caramel, but, depending on the other malts you used, may get washed away in the complexity.  Not a bad thing by any means.  I like to do things like this with recipes.  Amber IPAs are fun.  It really surprises people, they don't expect an amber ale to be an IPA.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Saint on August 07, 2013, 08:52:32 AM
Grey,
I started with a Muntons extract kit (I have a brooklyn brewery maple porter whole mash I'll be trying soon - but I'm still in extract mode...not quite gradumated to full mash...part of that is I'm not done making a mash tun out of my cooler either). it had two cans of extract and 1lb crushed crystal, I added 2 tsp irish moss and 2 tp gypsum, pilgrim hops (I think) and Golden hops, as well as the chocolate malt. what you said about creating an Amber IPA is really what I was going for and I was looking to help the hops with the gypsum - my first plan was a double IPA but that was over my "hobby" budget.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 07, 2013, 09:14:42 AM
You are on the right path.  the gypsum will help give you a nice, sharper, mouth feel.  Do you know what you base water profile is like?  Are you using bottled water, or city water?  If you get more astrigency out of the chocolate malt, you may look into using something like Carafa type malt (de-husked).  Using something like 2 or 3 oz of this dark roasted de-bittered malt will give you color without the other stuff that would clash with the caramel flavors and hops. 
There is nothing wrong with extract, it will cut about 2 hours out of your brewday.  I know all to well about budget brewing.  My kettle is a Bayou Classic 8 gallon SS with spigot.  My pops hooked me up on that one.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 07, 2013, 09:38:23 AM
I keep thinking I'd like a nicer brew kettle (using a 10gal alum today).  I'd prefer stainless with a ball valve and maybe even a thermometer.  But that's a couple hundred $$$ and doesn't really increase my productivity much. 

I see some advantages to a bigger kettle.  Being able to do 10gallon batches, load into a couple carboys and pitch different yeast.  I suppose I could do that now, putting 2.5-3gallons into each fermentation vessel.

My LBS has basic keg systems for $249.  2x korny kegs, double regulator, CO2 tank, connectors, hoses and picnic taps.  If I have $250 to sink into my hobby budget, that seems more compelling at the moment.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 07, 2013, 10:44:20 AM
My LBS has basic keg systems for $249.  2x korny kegs, double regulator, CO2 tank, connectors, hoses and picnic taps.  If I have $250 to sink into my hobby budget, that seems more compelling at the moment.

I would definitely recommend you go the way of the keg before you upgrade your kettle.  It's hard to work up the motivation to bottle now, kegging is so much easier.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on August 12, 2013, 08:11:10 PM
.....

My LBS has basic keg systems for $249.  2x korny kegs, double regulator, CO2 tank, connectors, hoses and picnic taps.  If I have $250 to sink into my hobby budget, that seems more compelling at the moment.
That's a good deal - around here new corny's are $100 each and a used CO2 tank is over $100 - I'd jump on that in a minute
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on August 12, 2013, 08:16:34 PM
American amber in primary, Brown ale in secondary
English Bitter in primary #2 - added a pound of my own honey with 10 mins to go to push the alcohol a little. Pitched aroma hops slightly earlier than scheduled.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 12, 2013, 08:42:41 PM
That's a good deal - around here new corny's are $100 each and a used CO2 tank is over $100 - I'd jump on that in a minute

kegs and tank are reconditioned for what it's worth.  I believe the regulator, hoses and fittings are all new.  I've hesitated thus far as that's only setup for "picnic" or party style - meaning you need to keep the kegs cool.  Fall, and winter are coming.  I often store drinks on my back patio from Oct-Mar as it's 40-50F for most of that time. 

I've priced out building a keezer and decided to finish building an AR-15 first :)


Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 12, 2013, 08:43:54 PM
English Bitter in primary #2 - added a pound of my own honey with 10 mins to go to push the alcohol a little. Pitched aroma hops slightly earlier than scheduled.

Joe, what's your yeast of choice for your English Bitter?  I've got a bunch of cascade hops I'm about to harvest and am accumulating recipes.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Wild Colonial Boy on September 05, 2013, 09:46:23 AM
I'm currently brewing 20+ litres of Pale Ale...I'm still new to the whole home brewing game so I used my Coopers DIY Brew Kit.  Its the perfect solution for me....I'm time poor and not in a position to get too serious into home brewing just yet.

I'll be bottling the pale ale brew in the next 48hrs and then it'll be time to try a stout.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Cedar on September 05, 2013, 10:14:21 AM
Anyone make hard apple cider? I MIGHT try my hand at that this year.

Cedar
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 05, 2013, 11:34:49 AM
Anyone make hard apple cider? I MIGHT try my hand at that this year.

Cedar

I have and would like to again.  I need to find a local source for raw cider.

It's ridiculously easy: 

Fill your fermenter with cider
I suggest you add campden (or similar) tablets if you plan to add commercial yeast, and let sit for 24hours
Pitch white wine yeast of choice
Fit airlock and wait a few weeks :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Cedar on September 05, 2013, 12:38:00 PM
Fill your fermenter with cider
I suggest you add campden (or similar) tablets if you plan to add commercial yeast, and let sit for 24hours
Pitch white wine yeast of choice
Fit airlock and wait a few weeks :)

I was going to go about it pretty much this way. Thanks for the 2nd opinon. I have enough carboys to make 15-20 gallons. I know I have 3, I might have a 4th. What do you bottle it into ? I have EZ-Cap bottles, which I usually save for soda, but I can also cap/cork recycled beer/wine bottles.

Cedar
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 05, 2013, 02:28:34 PM
I was going to go about it pretty much this way. Thanks for the 2nd opinon. I have enough carboys to make 15-20 gallons. I know I have 3, I might have a 4th. What do you bottle it into ? I have EZ-Cap bottles, which I usually save for soda, but I can also cap/cork recycled beer/wine bottles.

Cedar

Bottling is it's own subject  :)

I use a basic bottle capper like this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Bottle-Capper-Red-Baron-Homebrew/dp/B000Q6ARMY/ (http://www.amazon.com/Bottle-Capper-Red-Baron-Homebrew/dp/B000Q6ARMY/)

A secret capability with that model is you can remove the metal plates that fit the bottle neck and reverse them.  That gives you the ability to cap both typical 12oz beer bottles, as well as 25oz Martinelli cider and certain champagne bottles.  Last year I got over 100 empty Martinelli's cider bottles.  While the green glass is not ideal for beer, storing in a dark place works fine.

I must warn you though, be absolutely certain the fermentation has stopped in your cider BEFORE you bottle.  I literally had glass bottles explode in my garage, sending glass shrapnel into drywall.  This happened because the fermentation continued after capping, and the off gas could not escape.  Thank God they weren't left in the kitchen with kids, etc.

If you want carbonated cider, still wait for the fermentation to end in your carboy.  Prior to bottling boil 3/4cup corn sugar (search for substitute qty) into 1 1/2cup water and after cooled combine with 5 gallons of cider.   That gives just enough "oomph" to carbonate without making bottle grenades.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Cedar on September 05, 2013, 02:59:53 PM
My capper looks like
(http://www.brewps.com/prod_images/xlarge/BPS-BE120.jpg)

I have made mead, so I am always wary about making bombs in a bottle. I will have to ask Z if he wants still or bubbly cider. He had some and really liked it at a friends house he went to go play music at the other day. I thought maybe I would make him some for his birthday.

Cedar
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: apollyon on August 28, 2014, 12:27:49 PM
5 gal orange blossom mead is ready to transfer to the secondary and backsweeten
Bottled 5 gal pumpkin stout last weekend
Brewed 5 gal robust porter (Edmund Fitzgerald clone) last weekend
Filling the grain bill for the next three 5 gal batches: Christmas Ale, Gingerbread Ale, Cocoa Porter

Love this time of year :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 28, 2014, 12:31:27 PM
Monday I brewed an improvised porter. 

Malt bill was (from memory)

10# maris otter
1# carapils
1# caramel
1# munich
.5# chocolate

1oz columbus hops for bittering
1oz northern brewer for aroma
1oz cascade for aroma

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 29, 2014, 12:02:55 PM
I had a double brew day four weeks ago.
10 gallons of maple brown (4# of maple syrup)
and 5 gallons of a baltic porter that I am fermenting with Brett C.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on September 01, 2014, 08:00:37 PM
just bottled 50 bottles of Cream Ale, and 51 bottles of Smashing Pumpkin Ale
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: apollyon on September 02, 2014, 07:29:38 AM
Here's the Christmas Ale I brewed Sunday:

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 6.25 gal
Post Boil Volume: 5.5 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 5.0 gal   
Bottling Volume: 4.5 gal
Estimated OG: 1.065 SG
Estimated Color: 13.1 SRM
Estimated IBU: 35.7 IBUs
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
10 lbs 4.0 oz       Pale Liquid Extract
14.0 oz               Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L
3.0 oz                 Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L
1.0 oz                 Roasted Barley
1.00 oz               Ginger Root (Boil 60.0 mins)
1.00 oz               Cinnamon Stick (Boil 60.0 mins)
1.00 oz               Hallertauer (Boil 60.0 mins)
0.25 oz               Willamette (Boil 60.0 mins)
1.50 oz               Hallertauer (Boil 30.0 min)
1 tsp                   Irish Moss (Boil 15.0 min)
1/2 tsp                Yeast Nutrient (Boil 10.0 min)
1.00 oz               Cascade (Boil 5.0 min)
1 lbs                   Honey (flameout)
1.0 pkg               London Ale (White Labs #WLP013)

Standard partial mash, steeping specialty grains in a bag in 5 gal spring water for 30 min @ 154F.

Had to top up with about a gallon of tap water, and still the OG was high at 1.070 @ 90F (1.074 adjusted for temp).  It's in the carboy in the basement now with a blowoff tube, bubbling away like crazy. If I had known I was going to overshoot that high on the OG I would have done a starter; hoping the yeast don't get too stressed out during this fermentation.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 04, 2014, 09:27:15 AM
I think that the results of the yeast being slightly stressed will give you favorable results. That's ~ the gravity my Belgian Tripel starts at and I only pitch one vial. The beer is a 3rd place finisher in BOS and 1st place in the Belgian category.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on September 06, 2014, 10:35:12 AM
I've been busy lately...

On tap: Oatmeal Rye Stout, Honey Brown Ale
Fermenting: English Mild, Dry Stout
Dry Hopping: Amarillo IPA
Ageing: Spiced Oak Bourbon Stout

Next brew day - can't decide between a simple wheat with Nugget or a Golden Promise / Citra smash
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 07, 2014, 09:50:19 AM
Go with the GP/Citra SMaSH
then again... I am biased against wheat beers... I just can't enjoy them.  I will never turn down a beer that is handed to me... but if I have a choice, wheat beers are not on my list.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mountainmoma on September 07, 2014, 10:19:21 AM
I am making a first wine, from Muscat grapes from my back yard, so free fruit. EC-1118 yeast as it can get warm here.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 07, 2014, 03:51:19 PM
I picked up a few gallons of fresh apple cider in central WA this morning
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on September 09, 2014, 10:36:14 PM
I've been thinking about doing a cider lately - I did one at Xmas and refrigerated it after a short fermentation. Kept it really sweet and probably only 3% ABV. Have to keep it cold and drink it fast so it doesn't over carb.

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 09, 2014, 11:16:58 PM
I've been thinking about doing a cider lately - I did one at Xmas and refrigerated it after a short fermentation. Kept it really sweet and probably only 3% ABV. Have to keep it cold and drink it fast so it doesn't over carb.

I have almost a half gallon from a year ago where I let it way over ferment.  It's not pleasant to drink
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mnotlyon on September 10, 2014, 08:43:59 AM
I have almost a half gallon from a year ago where I let it way over ferment.  It's not pleasant to drink

I'm brewing my very first batch right now. I suspect I'm gonna have too much alcohol in it when I'm done. I added way too much brown sugar to the store bought apple juice, and started with a specific gravity of 1.090.

If I think it's too strong when it's done, can I just cut it with more apple juice?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 10, 2014, 09:44:57 AM
I'm brewing my very first batch right now. I suspect I'm gonna have too much alcohol in it when I'm done. I added way too much brown sugar to the store bought apple juice, and started with a specific gravity of 1.090.

If I think it's too strong when it's done, can I just cut it with more apple juice?

How long has it been fermenting?  I'd take a hydro reading now and see where you are at and even taste your sample afterwards.  If it's starting to get past where you want, I'd drop the temperature if possible.  I'm not a cider expert, but adding more apple juice would just "wake up" any residual yeast - similar to how priming sugar works to carbonate bottles.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mnotlyon on September 10, 2014, 09:57:40 AM
How long has it been fermenting?  I'd take a hydro reading now and see where you are at and even taste your sample afterwards.  If it's starting to get past where you want, I'd drop the temperature if possible.  I'm not a cider expert, but adding more apple juice would just "wake up" any residual yeast - similar to how priming sugar works to carbonate bottles.

It's been fermenting about a week and a half, and just now starting to slow down a little.

I read an article where the author was making a sweet sparkling cider by back sweeting his cider after fermentation. Then, he'd bottle most of it normally, saving a little bit to bottle in plastic soda bottles. When the soda bottles got firm, he would taste one to assure his carbonation was where he wanted it, and pasteurize his bottles.

It may be a little more advanced than what I'm ready for, but that was the goal for this batch. I'm just worried that my brew is gonna be much stronger than it should be, and wasn't sure if I could stop the process early without causing problems.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 10, 2014, 10:58:54 AM
It's been fermenting about a week and a half, and just now starting to slow down a little.

I read an article where the author was making a sweet sparkling cider by back sweeting his cider after fermentation. Then, he'd bottle most of it normally, saving a little bit to bottle in plastic soda bottles. When the soda bottles got firm, he would taste one to assure his carbonation was where he wanted it, and pasteurize his bottles.

It may be a little more advanced than what I'm ready for, but that was the goal for this batch. I'm just worried that my brew is gonna be much stronger than it should be, and wasn't sure if I could stop the process early without causing problems.

Be careful using glass bottles.  I actually had some cide grenades a few years back.  Thank goodness they exploded while no people or vehicles were parked nearby.  I actually pulled out glass shards from the dry wall.  Like an IED for home brewers...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mnotlyon on September 10, 2014, 03:12:41 PM
Be careful using glass bottles.  I actually had some cide grenades a few years back.  Thank goodness they exploded while no people or vehicles were parked nearby.  I actually pulled out glass shards from the dry wall.  Like an IED for home brewers...

Thanks for the warning. The way I understand it, I have two things to worry about. First, when I heat the bottles, the added heat will cause the pressure to increase, which could be a dangerous time. I intend to bring my water up to temperature outside, then kill the heat, and insert my bottles. Then, put the lid on. I won't go near the pan until the water temperature has gone down considerably.

The second thing that could cause me trouble is if I don't get the cider hot enough to kill the yeast. My plan for this potential problem is to keep the cider refrigerated and drink often. :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 10, 2014, 03:18:44 PM
Why heat the bottles?  Sure that's one method to sanitize, but you also have products like StarSan and similar.  In any case, you may wait for the glass to cool before bottling.  I did beer like that for years.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mnotlyon on September 11, 2014, 09:54:30 AM
Why heat the bottles?  Sure that's one method to sanitize, but you also have products like StarSan and similar.  In any case, you may wait for the glass to cool before bottling.  I did beer like that for years.

I'm trying to pasteurize the yeast inside the already bottled cider. Hopefully, this way, I can have a sweet, carbonated, cider that doesn't blow up if I  take it out of the fridge.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Hootie on September 12, 2014, 04:01:41 AM
bottled another 50 bottles of imperial porter
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 12, 2014, 06:56:09 PM
Why heat the bottles?  Sure that's one method to sanitize, but you also have products like StarSan and similar.  In any case, you may wait for the glass to cool before bottling.  I did beer like that for years.

If you heat a sealed bottle... that is already carbed... I'm pretty sure it will explode. 

If you are talking about pasteurizing before you seal your bottles, you will be fine.  I don't have the equation at my finger tips... but I believe that if the temp reaches 160 degrees, it only needs to stay there for ~ 15 seconds to end all microbial life.  Don't quote me on that... you should check with a Ball canning book, or on the interwebs
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mnotlyon on September 17, 2014, 09:54:29 AM
If you heat a sealed bottle... that is already carbed... I'm pretty sure it will explode. 

If you are talking about pasteurizing before you seal your bottles, you will be fine.  I don't have the equation at my finger tips... but I believe that if the temp reaches 160 degrees, it only needs to stay there for ~ 15 seconds to end all microbial life.  Don't quote me on that... you should check with a Ball canning book, or on the interwebs

I got my pasteurization idea here: [url]http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/fantastic-hard-cider-recipe-instructions-fall-spice-cherry-variations-411469//url] This technique has been used by a number of people. Some have more success than others.

For some reason, I can't follow directions very well. I'm always looking for an easier way. I decided to put my sweet, carbed cider in my dishwasher using the sanitize function. I read that the temperature should reach 155 degrees, which should be fine for pasteurization.

I had bottled my juice into 1 quart flip top bottles, and two 1.1 gallon mini kegs. About half way through the cycle, the mini kegs started deforming from the pressure. They didn't blow their seals, or rupture, but they aren't pretty and keg-shaped anymore.  :o I heard the pop, so I stopped the process to check on them. Some of the flip tops were starting to hiss a little. I decided the experiment was over, so I turned the dishwasher off, and waited for everything to cool down before jostling anything.

I was concerned that the large containers did not have a long enough cycle time to fully pasteurize, so I put everything into the fridge that I had room for. One mini keg is still setting in my sink in the basement. It is still deformed, but doesn't appear to be getting worse. It will stay there until it ruptures, or I get some help drinking it's contents, whichever comes first.

I opened one of the flip top bottles from the fridge yesterday. It was perfectly carbinated, pretty yummy, and very strong. A pint of this stuff will make you talk a bit funny. I didn't wanna see what a quart would do to me.  :beer:

I've got multiple other bottles of cider that I cut with various juices as an experiment to see what I like. I have not tried to pasteurize them. I let them carb for a day and a half, got scared and put them in the fridge. I'm hoping the cold temps will keep them safe, and that the power doesn't go out!  :jaw-drop:
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 17, 2014, 09:59:51 AM
I waited a bit too long, but harvested my hops.  Many had started to turn brown.

I'm going to limit these to aroma hops, as I can't predict the acidity.  Slightly bummed, but I have a few pounds of yakima hops in the freezer from last year.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on September 17, 2014, 06:32:44 PM
Kegged my Amarillo IPA, delicious.

Last one I compromised and made a session IPA with Golden promise, about a half pound wheat for head retention, 4oz honey malt - bittered with nugget hops, 1 oz Citra at 15, 2oz at flame out and I'm gonna dry hop with another ounce.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on October 13, 2014, 09:07:34 PM
Let's see - Dry Irish Stout / English Mild / Amarillo IPA on tap. Citra Pale Ale is a hop bomb and currently carbonating.

Just put together some cider for the holidays - 4 gallons of store juice and 1 gallon of local cider. Added 1 # dextrose. Using S-33 ale yeast as an experiment. OG is 1056 - I'm going to let this go totally dry, hit it with some Ksorb and KMBS to slow down the yeast, back sweeten with a ton of concentrate apple juice and keg / force carbonate it. Shooting for sweet, sparking cider around 5%.

Next up is likely more pale ale - it's my favorite. I have a bunch of Nugget for bittering and 7C hops from falconer flight. Probably 2 row, handful of wheat and hammer in the hops late. Maybe 7% beer with 60ish IBU.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on October 13, 2014, 09:15:48 PM
I started my first wine batch last weekend. Using a kit (so I can do it right the first time). The kit I am using:
http://www.baderbrewing.com/products/selection-international/winexpert-selection-international-new-zealand-pinot-noir
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mountainmoma on October 13, 2014, 11:40:16 PM
I have a gallon of fresh apple cider vinegar in the fridge that we dont need for fresh drinking and a bunch of ripe hichiya persimmons -- there must be some kind of cider I can do with these ? I wasted alot of time today trying to find a recipe online
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on October 14, 2014, 09:37:59 PM
Cider vinegar is not going to be much good for hard cider.

Persimmons could certainly be fermented - how much total do you think you have?

I would probably ferment the cider then rack it onto the fruit and let it age in secondary for a month or two, then package and age for a few more months.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on October 14, 2014, 09:45:36 PM
mnotlyon - bottled, sweet, carbonated cider is on of the toughest to achieve.

Simple: sweet still cider / dry carbonated cider / kegged sweet  carbed cider.

To make a sweet carbed cider you have to pasteurize or sweeten with splenda (gross).
 
DANGER OPTION - make small batches, 1 or 2 gallons - ferment it dry and then backsweeten and bottle. At the same time, bottle 1 in a plastic bottle. When the plastic bottle is carbed, get all the rest into the fridge and keep it cold. DRINK IT FAST. Cold will slow the yeast, but not kill them. The bottles will continue to carb until they over carb or BLOW UP.

But if you time it right, it works perfect. Make small batches so you can drink it quick.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mountainmoma on October 14, 2014, 09:54:17 PM
Cider vinegar is not going to be much good for hard cider.

Persimmons could certainly be fermented - how much total do you think you have?

I would probably ferment the cider then rack it onto the fruit and let it age in secondary for a month or two, then package and age for a few more months.

I mistyped, it was fresh apple cider NOT vinegar.

Anyway, today, I put the 1 gallon of apple cider in a bucket then put around 8 cups (16 individual fruits) of persimmon into a net bag, sqeezed and squished the persimmon, net bag is still hanging out in the juice -- took the hygrometer and I think it read 1.072, alittle hard to get a reading as the stuff is very thick and viscous from the persimmon, so I am thinking of leaving it be without adding sugar or honey -- I am also letting it just wild ferment.

I can get hold of ALOT of persimmons if I want. Online doesnt say much that is clear about fermenting them, I guess out of state people are often using american native persimmons, while out here we get alot of oriental persimmons, hichiya.

This is loosly based on a recipe from Wild ferment book by katz  -- his is  cyser tho, his recipe would have added 1 gallon of water and a quart of honey to the amounts of juice/persimmon. that would be $23 of honey, and not sure I would like it more, he is midwest with the native persimmons.

I was wondering about spicing it tho, and if I should add any sugar or not. It is awful sweet tasting, the apple juice was a brix of 17 -- that was read right when it was juiced, 4 days ago -- before adding the super sweet persimmon, although I think my hygrometer reading when the 2 were put together (after the apple juice semi-fermented for 4 days a bit on its own) was 1.072. The way it tastes right now before fermentng is almost pumpkinish, like it might be cool with spices
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on October 15, 2014, 09:42:36 AM
I need another keg.  Have a 5 gallon fermentation bucket with a fall NW ale with no place to go :(
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: apollyon on December 17, 2014, 06:52:54 AM
The robust porter is pretty much gone. The Gingerbread Ale and Cocoa Porter turned out really well...so much so that I will probably put them on the rotation for next year's holiday brewing.  The GLCA clone turned out even better than last year's batch...and much more potent.  Target OG was 1.065 and it came in at 1.076 (finished at around 8.7% ABV). I think the sugar content of the honey played a significant part (last year's batch was honey purchased at the LHBS, where this year's was the orange blossom honey I used for the mead). 

Up next is a double batch of imperial stout. A group of us purchased a 55 gal barrel from Hoppin' Frog and are all brewing the same recipe. I'm doing an extra 5 gal batch that will either serve as a reserve batch in case somebody encounters major off flavors (we'll taste before we put them in the barrel) or as a comparison batch for after the barrel aging is done.

I purchased some surplus specialty grains from the guy who did the bulk buy for the barrel project (chocolate, roasted barley, 120L), so I'm working on a breakfast stout recipe to use up some of the grains.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on December 17, 2014, 09:56:40 AM
I have a Belgian double I just brewed on 12/15/14.  It had a O.G. of 1.070.

Here's hoping the Wyeast Belgian Ardennes does the trick.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on December 23, 2014, 01:49:46 PM
Just finished my first batch of quickie wine:

(http://aedra.com/~sotto/tmp/wine_20141221.jpg)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 02, 2015, 08:51:12 AM
How did that Dubbel turn out Smurf?

Have you tried the wine yet Archer?
How did you get the juice? Do you have vines or did you buy a kit?

My last batch of brew for 2014 ended up infected...  >:(
I hate dumping 11 gallons of beer  >:( >:( >:( :'( :'( :'(

I am up in central Wisconsin visiting family for the holidays, but as soon as I get home, I'll be brewing an IPA to fill my empty kegs, and then maybe look at brewing a Russian Imperial Stout to age until the end of 2015  ;D

I haven't made a mead in a while, I may put a 5 gallon carboy to use with a batch of that....
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on January 02, 2015, 09:14:40 AM
Have you tried the wine yet Archer?
How did you get the juice? Do you have vines or did you buy a kit?

The wine turned out good. young but has a nice taste. I look forward to trying it in 6 months and a year if it lasts that long. It seems to evaporate, I open a bottle, and it disappears ;)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 02, 2015, 12:00:07 PM
I have trouble getting my dubbles consistent.  Seems if I add a bit too much candi sugar/palm sugar, etc. it turbocharges the yeast and actually reduces F.G. too much.
For this reason I've started backing off both the amount of hops and late boil sugars.

Maybe I'm not exactly hitting the high gravity designed, but it's a nicer drinking beer that still has that aroma in that style.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 03, 2015, 02:25:34 PM
Maybe I'm not exactly hitting the high gravity designed, but it's a nicer drinking beer that still has that aroma in that style.

This is the main reason I brew... I get to make it how I like it. I make a couple that aren't close to any one "style" but it makes me happy... that's what's important.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on January 26, 2015, 01:21:05 PM
First brew of 2015 this past weekend. Made an Imperial Amber IPA. Came in at 1090 OG, 95 IBU - should end up around 9.5%

Drinking a carbed cider, Saaz blonde, Rye stout and Nugget pale ale
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 26, 2015, 02:08:51 PM
Fermenting - Dark CA lager (variation of a steam beer)
On tap - Belgian Abbey Ale made from Maris Otter
On tap - NW pale ale made with home grown hops from last summer
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: TNVolunteer on January 28, 2015, 12:49:53 PM
In primary - Ginger Pilsner
In Bottles - Pumpkin Ale
In Secondary - Prickly Pear Mead (made this one w/juice of pears from my land, water out of my well, and local honey just a few miles away.  Looking good so far but still a long ways off.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on January 29, 2015, 10:30:11 PM
Just picked up 80# of Marris Otter. Some people would make a nice brown ale or a UK mild...

Me, I'm probably gonna hammer out a monster Black IPA.

Quick poll - do you like the name Cascadian Dark Ale or Black IPA for this style?

Cascadian Dark appeals to me, but it might be because I like names like "Baltic Porter" and "Foreign Extra"
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 29, 2015, 11:07:16 PM
As someone who lives in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and literally grows cascade hops on the side of the house, I feel qualified to answer this.

"IPA" anything is way over used, and there are so many, it's hardly a recognizable style any more.

So I'll vote for "cascadian".
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on January 30, 2015, 04:59:29 PM
If it's a good beer, I will call it delicious...
I guess if you call an India PALE Ale... black... it is a contradiction... IF... you are trying to make to a specific style...

Like visible art or audible art edible art, such as beer, is subjective.

I understand if you are selling your art, it is best to give it a name that your customers will know and understand... but as homebrewers... if it feels good do it! (or tastes good)

GW
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on February 27, 2015, 08:58:56 PM
Well - did brew the black IPA and made a big American wheat beer. Threw together a batch of cider. 15 gallons beer and 5 cider so far in 2015
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: joeinwv on March 21, 2015, 09:24:54 AM
Brew day! Looks like today will be a Marris Otter / Cascade pale ale - going to add some coriander and orange peel to this one. Shooting for 4.5% or so - something sessionable.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 21, 2015, 03:45:32 PM
I bought ingredients for a saison.  Not sure when I'll get 2-3 hours to myself to make it though...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Marinesg1012 on March 21, 2015, 09:32:11 PM
I didnt read through all 15 pages so I don't know if anything besides beer is okay but I have a cider in the carboy right now and a Blueberry mead that needs some more time to mellow out.

I normally do a carboy of regular cider and a carboy of cider sweetened with honey (Ciser?) I found a german recipe on line that I really like for that. I want to get into beer brewing but I havent found the time.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on March 22, 2015, 12:39:08 AM
I drove up to the local apple orchards (yes it is the off season, but they still have fresh cider for sale) and picked up a gallon. I plan on fermenting half straight out with Lalvin 71B and the other will be a cyser with ~ 3 lbs of honey. I've never actually fermented cider before. Been making beer for over three years and wine for almost 5.

I brewed up a monster coffee stout last weekend, OG was 1.100. Tomorrow I plan on racking into secondary. It was a 10 gallon batch, so I'll split it. trying to decide if I want to oak and whiskey both portions or just one... I figure maybe start with one of the 5 gallon carboys will get the whiskey soaked oak cubes to start, to see how it tastes.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Marinesg1012 on March 22, 2015, 12:44:15 AM
I drove up to the local apple orchards (yes it is the off season, but they still have fresh cider for sale) and picked up a gallon. I plan on fermenting half straight out with Lalvin 71B and the other will be a cyser with ~ 3 lbs of honey. I've never actually fermented cider before. Been making beer for over three years and wine for almost 5.

I brewed up a monster coffee stout last weekend, OG was 1.100. Tomorrow I plan on racking into secondary. It was a 10 gallon batch, so I'll split it. trying to decide if I want to oak and whiskey both portions or just one... I figure maybe start with one of the 5 gallon carboys will get the whiskey soaked oak cubes to start, to see how it tastes.

The next step in my cider adventure is going to finish in used liquor barrels. I just have to decide what flavor would match well with the cider and find a place to get the barrel.

It also amazes me how many cider operations don't know about hard cider, I go into places and buy 10 gallons of cider and they wonder what I am doing with it. A local place did offer a deal for 50 gallons if you brought your own barrel. I should of jumped on that deal.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mountainmoma on May 07, 2015, 06:29:37 PM
Bottled the white wine the other day, do not know what to call this style, it tastes good. It was white Muscat grapes grown in my yard fermented with EC1118 yeast. 14 1/2 bottles, not pretty bottles like Archer, just a mish-mash of used wine bottles I sterilized
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Greywolf27 on May 07, 2015, 06:46:58 PM
Poured some of my homnebrew at the Southern California Homebrew Festival last weekend. Almost went through all of my RyePA and about half of my coffee rye whiskey soaked oaked Russian Imperial Stout (5 gallons of each)

Luckily I still have 5 gallons of the RyePA (just racked it into a keg, it'll be carbed up in about a week) I also have a dark Saison finishing primary (10 gallons). I plan on splitting the batch, 5 gallons will get kegged, the other 5 will get a dose of cinnamon that is soaking in some vodka and a vanilla bean. I have 5 gallons of a tripel that I will be bottling in the next week with some Brett B (like Orval or Goose Island Matilda) I also started a gallon of JAOM (Joe's Ancient Orange Mead). I'm thinking about berwing a Double IPA with new German hops... Polaris and Hull Melon
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on May 07, 2015, 10:23:48 PM
Bottled the white wine the other day, do not know what to call this style, it tastes good. It was white Muscat grapes grown in my yard fermented with EC1118 yeast. 14 1/2 bottles, not pretty bottles like Archer, just a mish-mash of used wine bottles I sterilized

my bottles were re-uses also, i just sterilized them and slapped a quick and dirty label on them.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 08, 2015, 05:19:21 PM
I have a 6 gallon bucket of saison in the garage. 
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: mountainmoma on May 09, 2015, 11:12:55 PM
(http://s25.postimg.org/b0lvkpmdr/IMG_4974.jpg)
The results of my first bottling of the dry white muscat wine in my missmatched bunch of bottles

(http://s25.postimg.org/euaqg4ebz/IMG_4972.jpg)
And, they are living under the homeschool cabinet in the living room right now, so they can be on their sides and keep those short t-corks moist. Eventually I will find a rack to move them into
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on January 06, 2016, 10:11:05 AM
I have a 6 gallon bucket of saison in the garage.

I'm going to tap a keg of saison today. I know Belgians should be bottled but I'm lazy. Can't wait.

I'm formulating a tripel to brew next.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 06, 2016, 10:36:25 AM
Last weekend brewed a Belgian.  Added amber syrup a little chocolate malt.  Realize it's slightly out of the style, but I wanted a dark/dry finish this time.  Should be ready by easter.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on January 06, 2016, 10:56:57 AM
Realize it's slightly out of the style, but I wanted a dark/dry finish this time.

I've gotten VERY relaxed about style in Belgian brewing after reading books Like Farmhouse Ales and Brew Like a Monk. When you realize how many beers of this region are based on "what we grow" and "whatever's cheapest" there's plenty of wiggle room. For Pete's sake a "Trappist" could mean Orval or Chimay (which have almost nothing in common). I think if you are using the correct ingredients (base malt, hops, yeast) and following a Belgian process you're fine. We often forget that Duvel was just a goofy experiment.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 06, 2016, 03:57:09 PM
I've gotten VERY relaxed about style in Belgian brewing after reading books Like Farmhouse Ales and Brew Like a Monk. When you realize how many beers of this region are based on "what we grow" and "whatever's cheapest" there's plenty of wiggle room. For Pete's sake a "Trappist" could mean Orval or Chimay (which have almost nothing in common). I think if you are using the correct ingredients (base malt, hops, yeast) and following a Belgian process you're fine. We often forget that Duvel was just a goofy experiment.

I also used Maris Otter for my base grain.  Total franken-brew...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on January 06, 2016, 05:08:11 PM
I also used Maris Otter for my base grain.  Total franken-brew...

I believe that a similar combination worked for Surly Brewing locally... They do a lot of "goof off" brews.

http://surlybrewing.com/

Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on April 05, 2016, 12:38:06 PM
Got a yeast starter going. Brewing a tripel tomorrow. 15 lbs of grain... Oh joy. But the heavyweight Belgians are a personal favorite. My last saison had mixed reviews. My wife and I loved it, my dad loved it, but my father in law complained that beer should "be bitter". I think after this batch I'll do a high-p-a for him with Maris Otter, biscuit, and East Kent Goldings. Not my first choice as I live for Belgian beer but a darn fun project beer.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: strangetanks on April 05, 2016, 07:50:54 PM
Will be distilling a batch of gin this weekend.  It's strictly for medicinal purposes though.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: apollyon on June 08, 2016, 07:28:54 AM
Been awhile since I've been on. In the last few months we've bottled the barrel aged Scottish wee heavy and refilled the barrel with a Belgian quad. Both were great experiences. For the wee heavy, we pulled a gallon of wort and boiled it down to a quart (which made me nervous as hell because if you scorch it at all you can't use it). For the Belgian quad, we not only did a triple decoction but also made our own candi syrup.  Very pleased with the wee heavy now that it's bottle conditioned, and anxious to taste the quad when it comes out.  That said, I'm done with barrel projects for a bit.

I have an Oberon clone (using Bell's yeast) being dry hopped in the secondary now, and have a DIPA and a strawberry saison on deck.  I'm hoping to get my fermentation chamber finished before the saison so I can get the temp dialed in for that one.

Edit: I just realized it's been longer than I thought. I was just prepping for our first barrel project last time. The RIS recipe was amazingly good, but it turned out the original barrel we got had some stowaways. I still have a case of sour BBA imperial stout in the basement.  It's actually really good, even if it's not what we were going for.  That barrel is now being used for a Flanders Red (I opted out of that one in favor of the Scottish project).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Beetlebum on June 08, 2016, 11:13:13 AM
Picked about 8 lbs of cherries out of the backyard last weekend and now have a cherry mead bubbling in the basement. This is my first mead - looking forward to it.

I've brewed beers before but thanks to inspiration from TSP, I now have ciders and mead under the belt.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on June 09, 2016, 02:20:24 PM
my wife has been doing elderflower wine. quick and dirty and she drinks it like soda. the alcohol content is not too high
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 09, 2016, 04:56:10 PM
my wife has been doing elderflower wine. quick and dirty and she drinks it like soda. the alcohol content is not too high
Interesting.  How's this made?  Like dandelion wine?
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on June 09, 2016, 06:07:53 PM
Interesting.  How's this made?  Like dandelion wine?

I’ll 'borrow' my wife’s recipe and post it here.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: 1greenman on June 09, 2016, 09:17:04 PM
Does Water Kefir count?

It is a fermentation.  Gets right bubbly delicious if conditions are right!
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on June 14, 2016, 10:41:46 AM
Well my tripel was a flame-o disaster. Way too dark, way too malty, a little sweet, rummy notes, etc. Basically it drinks more like a quad, which was not my intent. I obviously went too high on special grains and gravity while not adding enough sugar to lean out the body. But I don't mind calling it a quad while I plan the next attempt. Led to funny conversation with my wife where she asked about the alcohol content and I told her it was just short of 11%. She asked why I insist on making every batch as potent as possible, especially when my favorite tripels are usually ~8-9abv. Good point. Back to the drawing board.

Today I'm starting another dry cider between beer batches. My next batch will be an IPA for my father in law. Right now I'm planning 100% Marris Otter and Fuggles for bittering, aroma, dry, and keg hops. Before you ask, yes it will be 9-10abv as is my preference.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 14, 2016, 10:53:03 AM
Well my tripel was a flame-o disaster. Way too dark, way too malty, a little sweet, rummy notes, etc. Basically it drinks more like a quad, which was not my intent. I obviously went too high on special grains and gravity while not adding enough sugar to lean out the body. But I don't mind calling it a quad while I plan the next attempt. Led to funny conversation with my wife where she asked about the alcohol content and I told her it was just short of 11%. She asked why I insist on making every batch as potent as possible, especially when my favorite tripels are usually ~8-9abv. Good point. Back to the drawing board.

In other words, you made a loaf of bread in a pint glass :)
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on June 14, 2016, 12:10:39 PM
In other words, you made a loaf of bread in a pint glass :)

Not my worst miss. The yeast "funk" is great yielding a fantastic nose and the malty back works if I call it a quad. To be fair, I'm a newbie on the Trappist type ales. Most of my brewing is more Belgian farmhouse so I'm trying to expand my knowledge. Not surprising my first crack at a tripel smacks more of a a biere de garde. I've done dubbels in the past but my bread and butter are saisons.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: archer on June 21, 2016, 10:50:22 PM
The Elderflower wine recipe and my wife's notes:
This recipe does not need yeast added to it. The elderflower contains it's own yeast and plenty of it. I found that you need to keep the temperature to about 70-to 80 when letting it steep. Just a wee bit cooler than bread proofing. Too hot, gives it an off flavor. It might get some mold. I found a a little blue mold is ok but not heaps. I also found that filtering with a wire mesh strainer first then with a funnel and coffee filter make for a clearer and nicer flavored champagne.
This recipe was originally from the band ”The Cure” website. It is Robert Smith's own recipe. He seemed to be thinking in metric when writing this. The metric measurements are correct. I had to do some correction of the American measurements. I do love this champagne. I hope you do too!

You will need:
1 and a half pounds of white sugar (750g)
1 and a half gallons of cold, filtered water (4.5 litre)
1 large lemon
4 fresh or dried elderflower heads
2 tablespoons of white or apple vinegar
large pot or bowl or bucket that is non reactive
medium pot

Warm about a quart of the water and dissolve the sugar in it use medium pot.
Let it cool.
Squeeze the juice of the lemon into the sugar water. Zest or slice the peel off lemon and also put into sugar water.
In large pot or bowl combine the sugar water/lemon,flower heads, vinegar and remaining water.
Let it steep for four days in a not brightly lit area. Do not fully cover it. It needs to out gas.
On the fourth day bottle it in very clean airtight bottles.
Allow to steep in bottle for another 6 to 10 days in a not brightly lit area.
Steep time in bottle is also dependent on temperature of room.
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on July 23, 2016, 05:59:32 PM
My kombucha kit just arrived. I plan to start this week. I'm very excited as I have no problem drinking two per day and at $4 a pop it's just too expensive. Hopefully brewing my own will cut the cost and let me drink this stuff by the quart. So pumped up for this project...
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: David in MN on January 21, 2017, 02:13:52 PM
Just finished bottling my currant mead and kegging my cider. The mead tastes great and I finally have a use for the currant plant (other than as a living bird feeder).
Title: Re: What are you brewing?
Post by: LvsChant on March 29, 2019, 01:32:37 PM
I have three projects going right now...

Apfelwein (1 gallon) using EdWort's recipe: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/edworts-apfelwein-33986/ (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/edworts-apfelwein-33986/) (in secondary)
Beaujolais (5 gallon) from concentrate. Just racked it into a 5 gallon glass carboy today.
Concord wine (1 gallon) from the recipe here: http://www.alabrew.com/ (http://www.alabrew.com/) (in primary)

I did not order the pectic enzymes recommended for the concord wine, so proceeded without that particular recipe item. Any idea how much this will affect my success?

Also ordered a kit for Noble Trappist Ale for my husband to try out beer brewing. http://www.midwestsupplies.com/noble-trappist-ale.html (http://www.midwestsupplies.com/noble-trappist-ale.html)

I know this is an old thread... but just for fun, thought I'd let you know about a bottle from the batch of Concord wine. After moving two times and keeping one bottle of this batch from 2010 until this week... I have to say that silly little batch of Concord wine tastes pretty good. Aging did help it a lot. Although you still get the flavor of concord grape juice to some degree (strange in a bottle of wine), it has a slightly tart bite to it and is a lovely sort of cognac color. It is a bit sweeter than I usually like, but totally drinkable.