Author Topic: Connected (to the internet) cars, 2020  (Read 890 times)

Offline Carver

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Connected (to the internet) cars, 2020
« on: February 01, 2020, 09:25:39 PM »
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Already, the top-three carmakers in the US — GM, Toyota, and Ford — plan to sell only connected cars this year, according to a report by the nonprofit Consumer Watchdog. Those three companies make up more than half of cars sold in the United States. Others car manufacturers are on track move to 100% of their vehicles connected to the Internet in the next five years.

https://www.darkreading.com/edge/theedge/car-hacking-hits-the-streets/b/d-id/1336730

One reason to get serious about auto maintenance.

Offline CarbideAndIron

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Re: Connected (to the internet) cars, 2020
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2020, 09:15:14 AM »
Yeah, that's just one more reason for me not to want a newer vehicle. This is what many of us talked or even joked about happening for years, and now there's actual incidents of it.
The good side is all the new good stuff like sequential fuel injection, engine management, and overdrive trannies is trickling down to the aftermarket now, and many of us are putting the technology on older cars, making them more reliable, efficient, and faster. So one can have an older vehicle, that isn't controlled by an online connected computer, yet it starts in any climate, has perfect air:fuel, and rides comfortably down the freeway doing 70 at low rpms.

Offline IKN

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Re: Connected (to the internet) cars, 2020
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2020, 10:21:57 AM »
Yeah, that's just one more reason for me not to want a newer vehicle. This is what many of us talked or even joked about happening for years, and now there's actual incidents of it.
The good side is all the new good stuff like sequential fuel injection, engine management, and overdrive trannies is trickling down to the aftermarket now, and many of us are putting the technology on older cars, making them more reliable, efficient, and faster. So one can have an older vehicle, that isn't controlled by an online connected computer, yet it starts in any climate, has perfect air:fuel, and rides comfortably down the freeway doing 70 at low rpms.

I totally agree with you.
Add that to the criminal level prices many of the auto retailers are selling new vehicles for, the loss of brand loyalty, and that many of the vehicles even across manufacturers all look the same with the exception of some trim pieces, it’s no wonder people don’t want the new autos.
Other factors I see are things like the “Cash for Clunkers” scam, the huge effort of car dealers to get rid of used car markets, and ever rising regulations combined with “Right to Repair” laws (which should be named “No Right to Repair”) forcing people to pay high prices to repair electronic components that should be cheap.
Besides after market components, I see a trend from people making their own “Open Source” electronic ECU’s and other computer style components for vehicles trying to get away from  over priced one from the manufacturers along with their “Proprietary” coding the price for which is tantamount to the cost of a good desktop computer which has 100 times the computing power.

A quick story here. A friend and co-worker of mine had the sensor in his throttle body of his car go bad which shut down his car stranding him in the middle of nowhere. When he priced a replacement from Ford, he was told they had to replace the whole throttle body and it would run $600 plus labor.
He looked and found an after market one for $400 and had a friend who was a mechanic that would replace it for free. He chose this route only to find the car still wouldn’t run, the cars computer wouldn’t recognize the after-market part. His mechanic friend told him that the only way this would work would be for him to take his car to a Ford service center to have the computer reprogrammed to accept the after-market part.
He contacted the Ford shop who told him it would run $250 to reprogram the cars computer. Add to that, he would have to get the car to the dealer requiring a tow.